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nd Arcturi: seemingly nonage has no line moet might

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mere presentment of the situation. Inexperienced critics have often named this, which may be called the Homeric manner, superficial, from its apparent simple facility : but first rate excellenee in it (as shown here, in cxcvI, CLVI, and cxxix) is in truth one of the least common triumphs of Poetry.-This style should be compared with what is not less perfect in its way, the searching out of inner feeling, the expression of hidden meanings, the revelation of the heart of Nature and of the Soul within the Soul,-the Analytical method, in short,- must completely repre

sented by Wordsworth and by Shelley. 231 CCXXXIV correi: covert on a hillside. Cumber : trouble. 243 CCXLIII This poem has an exaltation and a glory, joined

with an exquisiteness of expression, which place it in the highest rank amongst the many masterpieces

of its illustrious Author. 252 Calii interlunar swoon : interval of the Moon's invisibility. 257 Colvi Calpe : Gibraltar.. Lofoden : the Maelstroni whirl

pool off the N.W. coast of Norway. 259 CCLVII This lovely poem refers here and there to a ballad

by Hamilton on the subject better treated in cxxvII

and cxxvIII. 271 CCLXVIII Arcturi: seemingly used for northern stars. And

wild roses &c. Our language has no line modulated with more subtle sweetness. A good poet might have written And roses wild :-yet this slight change

would disenchant the verse of its peculiar beauty. 275 CCLXX Ceres' daughter: Proserpine. God of Torment: Pluto. - CCLXXI This impassioned address expresses Shelley's most

rapt imaginations, and is the direct modern representative of the feeling which led the Greeks to tbe

worship of Nature. 284 CCLXXIV The leading idea of this beautiful description of a

day's landscape in Italy is expressed with an obscurity not unfrequent with its author. It appears to be,-On the voyage of life are many moments of pleasure, given by the sight of Nature, who has power to heal even the worldliness and the uncharity of man.

1. 24 Amphitrite was daughter to Ocean. 286 --- 1. 1 Sungirt City : It is difficult not to believe that

the correct reading is Seagirt. Many of Shelley's poems appear to have been printed in England during his residence abroad : others were printed from his manuscripts after his death. Hence probably the text of no English Poet after 1660 con

tains so many errors. See the Note on No. IX. 289 CCLXXV l. 21 Maenad: a frenzied Nymph, attendant on

Dionysus in the Greek mythology.

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PAGE NO 290 cclxxv 1. 4 Plants under water sympathize with the seasons

of the land, and hence with the winds which affect 291 cclxxvI Written soon after the death, by shipwreck, of

Wordsworth's brother John. This Poem should be compared with Shelley's following it. Each is the most complete expression of the innermost spirit of his art given by these great Poets of that Idea which, as in the case of the true Painter, (to quote the words of Reynolds,) 'subsists only in the mind : The sight never beheld it, nor has the hand expressed it; it is an idea residing in the breast of the artist, which he is always labouring to impa

which he dies at last without imparting.' 292 - the Kind : the human race. 293 CCLXXVIII Proteus represented the everlasting changes,

united with ever-recurrent sameness, of the Sea. - CCLXXIX the Royal Saint: Henry VI.

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TuoNSON, Jannes (1700-1748) CXXII, CXXXVI

Vivoix, Henry (1621-1095) LXXV
TRAN, Kuward (1884-1604) XLI

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WAR, Bmund (16051687) LXXXIX, XOV nem?**John ( - 1638) XLVII

Re, tiparge (1388-1667) cu

i hari (1791-1893) OcXVIII WRONSWORTHWilliam (1770-1850) CLXXIV, CLXXVII, CLXXVIII,

VII IIIII! XIX, CC, CCVIII, CCX, CCXI, CCXII, CCXIII,

Yl l , ITI (CXXXVIII, COXL, CCXLII, CCXLIII, K I V IIN1, O'XLIX, CCL, CCLI, CCLIII, CCLIV, Y il, 111, 1, (CLXVI, CCLXIX, CCLXXII, CCLXXIII, NITI VIXXIII, 'LXXIX, CCLXXXI, OCLXXXII, CCLXXXVI,

171117 W T , Henry (158-1689) LXXII, LXXXIV WYAT, Thomas 1503--1349) XXL, XXXIII

("** TOWN: IX, XVII, XL, LXXX, LXXXVI, Xoi, xciv, XCVII, CVI,

(VI, VIII, XATI

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