Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

and will be entitled to their discharge in July. We cannot rely upon any of them re-entering the service, as wages for mechanics and laborers are so enormously high in this country. I consider it important that more troops should be sent here to preserve quiet and to secure possession of the two Californias. We cannot enrol any of the emigrants under the laws of May and June, 1846; they consider the pay, &c., allowed, entirely inadequate to their services. The late California battalion refused to a man to be mustered into service under those laws, and have been, by my order, discharged by Lieutenant Colonel Fremont. When they entered the service they were promised from $25 to $35 each per month; their horses and equipments to be furnished by the public, and rations to the families left behind, some of which have received as many as 11 per day, at 25 or 30 cents per ration each.

The wild Indians, by the frequent incursions of their small parties, are very troublesonte to the frontier inhabitants, driving off much of their stock, catile, and horses. These, as well as the Christian Indians, have been badly treated by most of the Californians; they think they are entitled to what they can steal and rob from them. I am of the opinion that much good might be done by making a few presents to them, and I rec

ommend that there should be sent here for that purpose some medals, .. beads, (white stones) red flannels, colored handkerchiefs, tobacco, &c.; a few colored blankets would be much prized by them. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. KEARNY,

Brigadier General. Hon. W. L. MARCY,

Secretary of War, Washington city, D. C.

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, May 1, 1947. Sir: I enclose herewith a copy of all, communications and papers issued by me relating to the civil department of Upper California up to this date. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General and Governor of California. Brigadier General R. JONES,

Adjutant General United States Army, Washington.

Edwin Bryant, esq., is hereby appointed alcalde of the town of Yerba Buena and of the district of San Francisco, vice Lieutenant W. A. Bartlett, who returns to his naval duties.

Given at Yerba Buena, Upper California, this 22d of February, 1847, and in the 71st year of the independence of the United States.

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General United States Army.

CIRCULAR.

To all whom it may concern, be it knoun:

That the President of the United States, desirous to give and secure to the people of California a share of the good government and happy civil organization enjoyed by the people of ihe United States, and to protect them at the same time from the attacks of foreign foes and from internal commotions, has invested the undersigned with separate and distinct powers, civil and military; a cordial co-operation in the exercise of which, it is hoped and believed, will have the happy results desired.

To the cominander-in-chief of the naval forces the President has assigned the regulation of the import trade, the conditions on which vessels of all nations, our own as well as foreign, may be admitted into the ports of the Territory, and the establishment of all port regulations.

To the commanding military officer the President has assigned the direction of the operations on land, and has invested him with adininis. trative functions of government over the people and territory occupied by the forces of the United States.

Done at Monterey, capital of California, this Ist day of March, A. D. 1847.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK, Commander-in-chief of the Naval Forces.

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General United States Army, and Governor of California.

[ocr errors]

PROCLAMATION.

To the people of California. The President of the United States having instructed the undersigned to take charge of the civil government of California, he enters upon his duties with an ardent desire to promote, as far as he is able, the interests of the couniry and the welfare of its inhabitants.

The undersigned has instructions from the President to respect and protect the religious institutions of California, and to see that the religious rights of the people are in the amplest manner preserved to them, the constitution of the United States allowing every man to worship his Creator in such a manner as his own conscience may dictate to him.

The undersigned is also instructed to protect the persons and property of the quiet and peaceable inhabitants of the country against all or any of their enemies, whether from abroad or at home; and when he now assures the Californians that it will be his duty and his pleasure to coniply with those instructions, he calls upon them all to exert themselves in prescrving order and tranquillity, in promoting harmony and concord, and in maintaining the authority and efficacy of the laws.

It is the wish and design of the United States to provide for California, with the least possible delay, a free government similar to those in her other Territories; and the people will soon be called upon to exercise their rights as freenen, in electing their own representatives to make such laws as may be deenied best for their interests and welfare. But until this can be done, the laws now in existence, and not in conflict with the

constitution of the United States, will be continued until changed by competent authority; and those persons who hold office will continue in die same for the present, provided they swear to support that constitution, and to faithfully perform their duty.

The undersigned hereby absolves all the inhabitants of California from any further allegiance to the republic of Mexico, and will consider them as citizens of the United States. Those who remain quiet and peaceable will be respected in their rights, and protected in them. Should any take up arms against or oppose the government of this Territory, or instigate rthers to do so, they will be considered as enemies, and treated accord. ingly.

When Mexico forced a war upon the United States, time did not permnit the latter to invite the Californians as friends to join her standard, but compelled her to take possession of the country to prevent any European power from seizing upon it; and in doing so, sove excesses and unau.. horized acts were no doubt committed by persons employed in the service of the United States, by which a few of the inhabitants have met with a loss of property. Such losses will be duly investigated, and those entitled to remuneration will receive it.

California has for many years suffered greatly from domestic troubles ; . civil wars have been the poisoned fountains which have sent forth trouble and pestilence over her beautiful land. Now, those fountains are dried up; the star-spangled banner floats over California ; and as long as the sun continues to shine upon her, so long will it float there over the natives of the land, as well as others who have found a home in her bosom; and under it, agriculture must improve and the arts and sciences Hourish, as seed in a rich and fertile soil.

The Americans and Californians are now but one people ; let us cherish one wish, one hope, and let that be for the peace and quiet of our country. Let us as a band of brothers unite and emulate each other in our exertions to benefit and improve this our beautiful, and which soon must be our happy and prosperous home.

Dove at Monterey, capital of California, this first day of March, A.D. 1517, and in the 71st year of the independence of the United States.

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General T. S. A., and Governor of California.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, Californiu, March 1, 1847. Sie: By department orders No. 2 of this date, which will be handed to you by Captain Turner, first dragoons, acting assistant adjutant general for my command, you will see that certain duties are there required of you as commander of the battalion of California volunteers.

In addition to the duties above referred lo, I have now to direct that you will bring with you, and with as little delay as possible, all the archives and public documents and papers which may be subject to your

control, and which appertain to the government of California, that I may receive them from your hands at this place, the capital of the Territory. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. KEARNY,
Brigadier General, and Governor of California,
Lt. Col. J. C. FREMONT,
Regiment Mounted Rifles, commanding batlalion

California Volunteers, Ciudad de los Angeles.

[ocr errors]

MONTEREY, March 3, 1847. SIR: I have this day received yours of the 26th ultimo, asking me to provide for your office an interpreter and translator of the Spanish language, and in reply I have to observe that the Territorial government cannot make an appointment of such an officer, nor furnish funds for the payment of one. If an interpreter is indispensable, (as you say,) I know of no other way in which you can obtain him than by your selecting one and paying him from the fees of your office.

I have also 'received a copy of the proceedings of a meeting of the people of Sonoma, at which L. W. Boggs presided, relating to their being represented in the legislative council; and I will thank you to inform all concerned that I have not called for any such council, nor at present do I contemplate doing so. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General, and Governor of California.. Joyn H. NASH, Esq.,

Alcalde, fc., Sonoma.

MONTEREY, March 4, 1947. Dear Sir : I yesterday received a copy of the proceedings of meet-ings of the people held at Yerba Buena and at Sonoma, at which M. S. Cooper and L. W. Boggs presided, relating to the representation in the legislative council; and I will thank you, in reply, to say to these gentlemen, and all others interested and cencerned in the matter, that I have not called for any such council, nor do I at present contemplate doing so. Very respectfully,

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General, and Governor of California. Edw. BRYANT, Esq.,

Alcalde, Yerba Buena.

William Edward Petty Hartwell is hereby appointed translator and interpreter of the Spanish language for the governor and military commandant of California.

Done at Monterey this 10th day of March, 1847, and of the independence of the United States the 71st.

S. W. KEARNY,
Brigadier General, and Governor of California,

The above named Hartwell is employed at a salary at the rate of fifteen hundred dollars per year.

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier General.

1, Brigadier General S. W. Kearny, governor of California, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the President of the United States of America, do hereby grant,convey, and release unto the town of San Francisco, the people or corporate authorities thereof, all the right, title, and interest of the government of the United States, and of the Territory of California, in and to the beach and water lots, on the east front of said town of San Francisco, included between the points known as the “Rincon,” and “ Fort Montgomery,” excepting such lots as may be selected for the use of the general government by the senior officers of the army and navy now there; provided the said ground hereby ceded shall be divided into lots, and sold by public anction to the highest bidder, after three months' notice previously given; the proceeds of said sale to be for the benefit of the town of San Francisco.

Given at Monterey, capital of California, this 10th day of March, 1847, and in the 71st year of the independence of the United States.

S. W. KEARNY, Brigadier Genera', and Governor of California.

Know all men by these presents, that I, Brigadier General S. W. Kear. ny, governor of California, by virtue of authority in me vested, considering that, inasmuch as there are various claimants to the missions of San José, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and San Juan, to the houses, grounds, gardens, vineyards, &c., around and wear them, do hereby decree, that until the proper judicial tribunals, to be established, shall decide upon the same, the above named missions and property appertaining thereto shall remain under charge of the Catholic priests, as they were when the United States flag was first raised in this Territory-it being understood that this decree is not to affect the rights of any claimants, and that the priests are to be responsible for the preservation of said missions and property whilst under their charge.

The alcaldes of the jurisdictions in which the above-named missions are situated will, upon the applications of the priests, take the proper measures to remove therefrom all persons trespassing or intruding upon them. Given at Monterey, capital of California, this 22d day of March, 1947.

Brigadier General, and Governor of California.

,

Know all mon by these presents, that I, S. W. Kearny, Brigadier Gen. eral United States army, and governor of California, by virtue of authority in me vested by the President of the United States, do hereby appoint

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »