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INDEX.

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The Fall of Niagara,

5
Matchit Moodus,
On the Death of Commodore Perry,.

10
A Mariner's Song, .

13
Epithalamium,

14
Introduction to a Lady's Album,

15
The Shad Spirit,

17
The Tree Toad,

19
Spring. To Miss

21
On the Birthday of Washington,

23
Lines suggested by a melancholy Accident,

25
On a late Loss,

27
On the Death of the Rev. L. Parsons, ..

28
On the project of colonizing the “ Free People of Colour” in
Africa, .

30
To the Marquis La Fayette,

31
Maniac's Song,

33
To the memory of Charles Brockden Brown, .

35
Lord Exmouth's Victory, .

37
Written for a Lady's Common-Place Book,

41
The Lost Pleiad,

43
The Alligator,

44
The Sea Gull,

45
The Captain. A Fragment, .

47
Extracts from Verses written for the New-Year, 1823,

51

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The thoughts are strange that crowd into my brain,
While I look upward to thee. It would seem
As if God pour'd thee from his “hollow hand,”
And hung his bow upon thine awful front;
And spoke in that loud voice, which seem'd to him
Who dwelt in Patmos for his Saviour's sake,
6 The sound of many waters ;” and had bade
Thy flood to chronicle the ages back,
And notch His centries in the eternal rocks.

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Deep calleth unto deep. And what are we,
That hear the question of that voice sublime ?
Oh! what are all the notes that ever rung
From war's vain trumpet, by thy thundering side!
Yea, what is all the riot man can make
In his short life, to thy unceasing roar!

And yet, bold babbler, what art thou to Him, Who drown'd a world, and heap'd the waters far Above its loftiest mountains ?-a light wave, That breaks, and whispers of its Maker's might.

MATCHIT MOODUS.

A traveller, who accidentally passed through East Haddam, made several inquiries as to the “ Moodus noises,” that are peculiar to that part of the country. Many particulars were related to him of their severity and effects, and of the means that had been taken to ascertain their cause, and prevent their recurrence. He was told that the simple and terrified inhabitants, in the early settlement of the town, applied to a book-learned and erudite man from England, by the name of Doctor Steele, who undertook, by magic, to allay their terrors; and for this purpose took the sole charge of a blacksmith's shop, in which he worked by night, and from which he excluded all admission, tightly stopping and darkening the place, to prevent any prying curiosity from interfering with his occult operations. He however so far explained the cause of these noises as to say, that they were owing to a carbuncle, which must have grown to a great size, in the bowels of the rocks; and that if it could be removed, the noises would cease, until another should grow in its place. The noises ceased-

the doctor departed, and has never been heard of since. It was supposed that he took the carbuncle with him. Thus far was authentic. A little girl, who had anxiously noticed the course of the traveller's inquiries, sung for his further edification the following ballad :

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cular of the

pre

ter:

Now why is each crevice stopp'd so tight?

Say, why the bolted door?
Why glimmers at midnight the forge's light-
All day is the anvil at rest, but at night

The flames of the furnace roar ?

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Is it to arm the horse's heel,

That the midnight anvil rings?
Is it to mould the ploughshare's steel,
Or is it to guard the wagon's wheel,

That the smith's sledge-hammer swings?

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