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THE

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE

AND

Humor is t.

EDITED BY

W. II ARRISON AINSWORTH, ESQ.

VOL. 87.

BEING THE THIRD PART

FOR 1849.

LONDON:

CHAPMAN AND HALL, 186, STRAND.

MDCCCXLIX

C. WUITING, BEAUFORT HOUSE, STRAND, LONDON.

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PAGE LEGENDS OF TRACHENBERG. By John OXENFORD, Esq. The HABITUÉ's Note-Book. BY CHARLES HIERVEY, Esq.

373, 490 EIGHTEEN MOnths' POLITICAL LIFE IN Italy. By L. MARIOTTI

· 385 RYDE REGATTA; OR, YACHTING FREAKS. A TALE OF 1849

410 TYRONE AND TYRCONNELL. By W. FRANCIS AINSWORTH, Esq.

424 The CORDELIER OF SISTERON. By Dudley Costello, Esq. .

440 PARIS AND THE PARISIANS

460 LITERATURE (FOR SEPTEMBER):-PAST AND FUTURE EMIGRATION; or,

THE BOOK OF THE CAPE. EDITED BY THE AUTHOR OF “ FIVE YEARS IN
KAFIRLAND.”-ADVENTURES OF A GREEK LADY. WRITTEN BY HER-
SELF.-WAYSIDE PICTURES THROUGH FRANCE, BELGIUM, AND HOLLAND.
BY ROBERT BELL.---THE FORTUNES OF WOMAN: MEMOIRS, EDITED BY
MISS LAMONT.-A MEMOIR OF THE COUNTESS DE ROSSI (MADAME SON-
TAG). --BEFORE AND AFTER. --CRAYFORD; OR, THE FORCE OF INFLU-
ENCE. MOOLTAN. BY JOIN DUNLOP, M.D.-THE MARINE BOTANIST.
BY ISABELLA GIFFORD.-- PORTLAND ISLAND AND BREAKWATER.-NA-
TIONAL EVILS AND PRACTICAL REMEDIES. BY JAMES S. BUCKINGHAM.
-PANORAMA OF THE NILE.MISCELLANEOUS NOTICES

121 To 130
(FOR OCTOBER):- MATERNAL LOVE. A NOVEL BY MAR-
GRATIA LOUDOX.-THE OLD WORLD AND THE NEW, A NOVEL. BY MRS.
TROLLOPE. ERNESTO DI RIPALTA: A TALE OF THE ITALIAN REVOLU-
TION. BY THE AUTHOR OF "NOTES OF A TWO YEARS' RESIDENCE IN
ITALY.” — THE MODERN HOUSEWIFE; OR, MÉNAGÈRE. BY ALEXIS
SOYER.-STRATAGEMS: A STORY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. BY MRS. NEWTON
CROSLAND (LATE CAMILLA TOULMIN). - TINTS FROM AN AMATEUR'S
PALETTE; OR, A FEW STRAY HUES OF THOUGHT. BY ALFRED JACK-
SON.

256 TO 258 (FOR NOVEMBER):-THE OGILVIES. A NOVEL. THE CAXTONS: A FAMILY PICTURE. BY SIR E. BULWER LYTTON, BART. ERNEST VANE. BY ALEXANDER BAILLIE COCHRANE, M.P.—THE LORD OF THE MANOR; OR, LIGHTS AND SHADES OF COUNTRY LIFE. BY JOHN THOMAS HALL, ESQ.- SELECTIONS FROM THE POEMS AND LETTERS OF BERNARD BARTOX. EDITED BY HIS DAUGHTER.FRENCH AND ENGLISH DICTIONARY. BY PROFESSOR A. SPIERS, PH.D.-THE ROMANCE OF THE PEERAGE; OR, CURIOSITIES OF FAMILY HISTORY. BY GEORGE LILLIE CRAIK. VOL. III.--RUINS OF MANY LANDS. A DESCRIPTIVE POEM. BY NICHOLAS MICHELL.

378 TO 384 (FOR DECEMBER):

:-THE FRENCH REVOLUTION OF 1848: FROM THE 24TH OF FEBRUARY TO THE ELECTION OF THE FIRST PRESIDENT. BY CAPTAIN CHAMIER, R.N.-MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE ENGLISH BY MRS. WHIITAKER.-SHIRLEY. ATALE. BY CURRER BELL.

THE GOLDEN CALF; OR, PRODIGALITY AND SPECULATION IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.-PASSAGES IN THE LIFE OF MRS. MARGARET MAITLAND OF SUNNYSIDE. WRITTEN BY HERSELF-HANDS NOT HEARTS. A TALE OF THE DAY. BY JANET W. WILKINSON.-DARK SCENES OF HISTORY. BY G. P. R. JAMES, ESQ. - BLACK WILLIAM's GRAVE. BY MINIMUS MOTE, GENTLEMAN

499 To 514

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

POSTHUMOUS MEMOIR OF MYSELF.

BY HORACE SMITH, Esq.

AUTHOR OF “BRAMBLETYE HOUSE," &c. &c. [Accidental circumstances prevented the appearance of this Tale during the

life-time of its gifted and lamented Author, but the proofs were corrected by him. Taken in connexion with the melancholy event which so speedily and unexpectedly followed its composition, the article presents a singular coincidence of title, and becomes invested with deep and peculiar interest.ED. N. M. MAG.]

CHAPTER I. You here !" I exclaimed, in no very courteous tone, as I turned round, and saw my old friend Dr. Linnel quietly seating himself by my bedside. “ Who sent for you ?

“No one ; I was brought hither by one of the best and prettiest young ladies in all Warwickshire-your daughter."

“ Then Sarah has not only taken a very great liberty, but has disobeyed my positive orders, as she has done more than once lately. For some time past has she been pestering me to send for you, which I have constantly refused to do. I have told her, at least a hundred times, that I don't like physic, and hate doctors."

“I am glad to see that your malady has not injured your talent for paying compliments.”

“ Nay, I meant not to say anything rude or personal. As a visitant or a friend I am always glad to see you. Even when you are sarcastic and

say sharp things, as you do sometimes, one cannot be offended with a man who wears such a bland, imperturbable smile, and speaks in so soft a voice ; but as a writer of prescriptions, I confess frankly-you know I hate flummery—that I had rather have your room than your company.

When

my
time's

come, I can die without the assistance of a doctor.”

Very likely; but the question is, can you live without it?"
Why not? I am sixty-three, and never consulted a physician in all

Perhaps you were never ill before ?” “ Never! and I'm not exactly ill now, only completely out of sorts, as most men are at this precise time of life-weak and languid, and all that sort of thing—seedy, as my son George calls it; and so I promised Sarah that I would lie abed to-day, just to see whether it would recruit me a bit.” Sept.- VOL. LXXXVII. NO. CCCXLV.

B

66

my life.

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