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In THREE PARTS.

Written in the Time of the

LATE WARS.

Corrected and Amended :

W I TH

ADDITIONS.

To which is added,
Α Ν Ν Ο Τ Α Τ Ι Ο Ν S,

With an exact

IN DE X to the Whole.

LONDON:
Printed by ROBERT BROWN,
For W. INNYS, J, and P. KNAPTON, D. BROWNT,

S. Birt, T: LONGMAN, T. WOODWARD,
C. Hitch, J. OSWALD, J. SHUCK BURGH,
J. HODGES, E. WICKSTEED, C. COR BET,
G. HAWKINS, J. and R, TONSON, M. COOPER,
B. Dod, and C. BA THURST, in Fleet-Streets

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ing.

Exegi monumentum ære perennius ; Or with OVID,

Jamque opus exegi, quod nec Jovis ira, nec ignis Nec poterit ferrum, nec edax abolere vetustas.

The author of this celebraced poem was of this last composition ; for although he had not the happiness of an academical education, as some affirm. it may be perceived, throughout his whole

poem that he had read much, and was very well accomplished in the most useful parts of human learn

RAPIN (in his reflections) speaking of the necessary qualities belonging to a poet, tells us, he must have a genius extraordinary: great natura gifts; a wit juft, fruitful, piercing, folid and uni: versal ; an understanding clear and distinct; ar imagination neat and pleasant; an elevation o foul, that depends not only on art or Itudy, bu is purely the gift of heaven, which must be sustain ed by a lively lense and vivacity; judgment to con fider wisely of things, and vivacity for the beauti fal expression of them, &e.

Now, how justly this character is due to our au thor, I leave to the impartial reader, and those o nicer judgments, who had the happiness to be mor intimately acquainted with him.

The reputation of this incomparable poem is í thoroughly established in the world, that it woul be fuperfluous, if not impertinent, to endeavou any panegyric upon it. King CHARLES II, whor the judicious part of mankind will readily acknow ledge to be a sovereign judge of wit, was so grea

a

an admirer of it, that he would often pleasantly quote it in his conversation : however, since most men have a curiosity to have some account of such

anonymous authors, whose compositions have been ignis,eminent for wit or learning; I have been desired ustas. to oblige them with such informations, as I could

receive from those who had the happin 3 to be acof this

quainted with him, and also to rectify the mistakes hope of the Oxford antiquary, in bis Athenæ Oxonienaffirm,

fes, concerning him. poem, Ell acJean

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whom now great

T HE

AUTHOR's
L I F E
S

AMUEL BUTLER, the author of this excellent poem, was born in the parish of

Strensham, in the county of Worcester, and baptized there the 13th of Feb. 1612. His father who was of the same name, was an honest country farmer, who had some small estate of his own but rented a much greater of the Lord of the ma nor where he lived. However, perceiving in thi son an early inclination to learning, he made a shif to have him educated in the 'free-school at Worcel ter, under Mr. Henry BRIGHT; where havink passed the usual time, and being become an excel lent school-fcholar, he went for some little time tCambridge, but was never matriculated into tha university, his father's abilities not being sufficient to be at the charge of an academical education ; :s that our author returned soon into his native cour try, and became Clerk to one Mr. Jefferys « Earls-Croom, an eminent Justice of the Peace for that county, with whom he lived some years, an easy and no contemptible service. Here, by the indulgence of a kind master, he had fufficient le fure to apply himself to whatever learning his ir

clinatio

clinations led him, which were chiefly history and poetry ; to which, for his diversion, he joined music and painting; and I have seen some pictures,

faid to be of his drawing, which remained in that s family ; which I mention not for the excellency

of them, but to satisfy the reader of his early inclinations to that noble art ; for which also he was afterwards entirely, beloved by Mr. SAMUEL COOPER, one of the most eminent painters of his

time. this

He was, after this, recommended to that great - of

of learning, ELIZABETH Countess of and

encourager

Kent, where he had not only the opportunity to her, confult all manner of learned books, but to contry rerse also with that living library of learning, the wn,

great Mr. SELDEN.

Our author lived some time also with Sir SAMUEL Luxe, who was of an ancient family in Bedfordthire ; but, to his dishonour, an eminent Com

mander under the Usurper OLIVER CROMWELL ¢ ng and then it was, as I am informed, he composed

this loyal poem. For, though fate, more than hat

zboice, feems to have placed him in the service of a

Knight so notorious, both in his person and polijent ots, yet, by the rule of contraries, one may ob

Inve throughout his whole poem, that he was molt orthodox, both in his religion and loyalty. And I am the more induced to believe he wrote it

about that time, because he had then the opportu. the

Lty to converse with those living characters of reklion, nonsense, and hypocrify, which he fo lively and pathetically exposes throughout the wholework.

After the restoration of King CHARLES II. thon who were at the helm, minding money more t]

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