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OR,

FAMILY PRIDE.

BY

MRS. TROLLOPE,

AUTHOR OF

“THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF A CLEVER WOMAN,"

THE BARNABYS,” &c. &c.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

LONDON;
HURST AND BLACKETT, PUBLISHERS,
SUCCESSORS TO HENRY COLBURN,
13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET,

1855.

249. y. 57

GERTRUD E.

CHAPTER 1.

The conversation between the Baroness von Schwanberg and the Frau Odenthal, which was recorded some chapters back, had been forgotten by neither of them ; nor was it likely that it should be; for they had both of them been deeply in earnest in the opinions they had then expressed; and though the subject had not been fully, nor even openly discussed, they had both made themselves sufficiently understood to have each created a lasting feeling of sympathy and esteem in the other.

But, to the regret of both, the intercourse

VOL. II.

B

so auspiciously began, and which seemed to promise so much mutual gratification and comfort, was suddenly and painfully checked by the earnest entreaty of Madame Odenthal's last surviving sister, that, as her son no longer required her presence in order to ensure him a comfortable home, she would make her long-talked-of visit to England.

As this letter, in addition to its earnest entreaties, brought also the pecuniary means of complying with them; the good woman aroused her courage, and set off for England.

Once there, she soon reaped the reward of her exertions, by perceiving that her presence was indeed a comfort to the affectionate relative she went to visit, and whose failing health certainly made her presence more useful there, than it could have been in the house of her brother Alaric, who since his nephew had been domiciled at the castle, had greatly less need of her usefulness than her invalid sister.

The letters which passed between her and her son, were long and frequent ; and it was so evident from those of the young man,

that the home he had found in the castle was in every way more advantageous than it could ever be in her power to make that of Father Alaric, that the idea that it might be necessary for her to return for Rupert's sake, soon died away, and was forgotten.

But though, in the case of her son, the weeks, months, and years, wore away without bringing any probability that he was likely to lose his present asylum, and return to the humble roof of his uncle, the case was different with herself; the sister of Madame Odenthal died, bequeathing to her all she possessed, which, although amointing to no very large revenue, was enough to ensure her the same peaceful home which she had so long enjoyed under the roof of Father Alaric, and with the additional comfort of being able to remunerate him for it.

The return of this very unassuming, but very excellent woman, was hailed with joy, not only by her brother and her son, but by that son's discerning patroness also, who welcomed her rather as a greatly valued

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