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PRINT ED BY JOAN BROWN, ANCHOR CLOSE,

FOR THE PROPRIETORS,
AND SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELI.ERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

1816.

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M I N

M IN (I.) * MINE. n. (: (mine, French ; mwyn or base is double the height taken from the centre

mwn, Welsh, from maen lapis, in of the mine. 4. That when the mine has been the plural meini.) 1. A place or cavern in the overcharged, its entonnoir is nearly cylindrical, earth which contains metals or minerals. the diameter of the upper extreme not much exIn your large heart was found a wealthy mine. ceeding that of the chamber. s. That besides the

iValler. shock of the powder against the bodies it takes -A workman, to avoid idleness, worked in a up, it likewise crushes all the earth that borders groove or mine.pit thereabouts, which was little upon it, both underneath and Gidewise. To charge esteemed. Bogle.-A mine-digger may meet with a mine so as to have the most advantageous effect, a gem, which he knows not what to make of. the weight of the matter to be carried must be Bogle.—The heedless mine-man aims only at the known; that is, the solidity of a right cone, whose obtaining a quantity of such a metal as may be base is double the height of the earth over the cenvendible. Boyle. 2. A cavern dug under any for. tre of the mine: thus, having found the folidity of lification that it may link for want of support; or, the cone in cubic fathoms, multiply the number in modern war, that powder may be lodged in it, of fathoms by the number of pounds of powder which being fired at a proper time, whatever is necessary for raising the matter it contains; and if over it may be blown up and destroyed.

the cone contains matters of different weights, What mine hath erst thrown down so fair a take a mean weight between them all, always tower ?

Sidney. having a regard to their degree of cobelion. As - Build up the walls of Jerusalem, which you to the disposition of mines, there is but one genehave broken down, and fill up the mines that you ral rule, viz. that the side towards which one would have digged. Whitgift.

determine the effect be the weakest; but this va Others to a city strong

ries according to circumstances. The calculation Lay fiege, encamp'd; by batt'ry, scale, and mine, of mines is generally built upon this hypothesis, Assaulting.

Milton. That the entonnoir of a mine is the fruftum of an (II.) MINE, in the military art, (I. def. 2.) inverted cone, whose altitude is equal to the raSee MINE, y II. in last voluine, p. 720. From dius of the excavation of the mine, and the diaa great number of experiments, it appears, i, meter of the whole lesser base is equal to the line That the force of a mine is always towards the. of least resistance; and though these suppositions Feakest fide; so that the dispofition of the cham- are not quite exact, yet the calculations of mines ber of a mine does not at all contribute to deter- deduced from them have proved successful in mine this effect. 2. That the quantity of pow. practice; for which reason this calculation should der must be greater or less in proportion to the be followed till a better and more fimple one be. greater or less weight of the bodies to be raised, found out. M. De Valliere found that the enton. and to their greater or less cohelion; so that we noir of a mine was a parabaloid, which is a folid muft allow for cach cubic fathom of loose earth generated by the rotation of a femiparabola about 9 or 10 lb. Of firm earth and friong fand, 11 or its axis; but as the difference between these two 13 lb. Of Bat clayey earth, 15 or 16 lb. Of new is very insignificant in practice, that of the frulmasonry, not frongly bound, 15 or 20 lb; and tum of a cone may be used. of old masonry, well bound, as or 30 lb. 3. (III. 1.) Mine, in natural history, (II. def. 1.) That the aperture, or entonnoir of a mine, if right. Anplies a deep pit under ground, whence various by charged, is a cone, the diameter of whose kinds of minerals are dug out; but is more partiVOL. XV. Part I.

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