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ployed. Education can alone prepare him for it. To the uneducated, its gross occupation would be far more exhausting and demoralising than the excess of labour. Who does not rejoice in the weekly half-holiday, wherever it is allowed 2 In the earlier closing of shops ? In the limitation of the hours of business 2 It furnishes an opportunity of mental improvement. But were it to respect the uneducated, those who scorn all education,-important as we might deem it in itself, we could not but dread its constant abuse. We can conceive of a nation so full of mechanical auxiliaries, that its labourers need not work more than six hours in the day: we can conceive of that nation occupying itself in mental and virtuous activity: but we could not trust even Britain yet! The unfolding of the moral principles of our nature is a necessary part in the highest education, and nothing inferior to this purpose can we desire for our poorer countrymen. For though we think literary knowledge is a boon,_though we would all were thus enlightened,—though we abhor and scorn the doctrine, that were this all, it were better to withhold it altogether, we shrink not from the avowal, that this would be most imperfect. It would not be the discipline of the proper mind, the true soul, of man. It would be slight and disparagement of that which covers him with his greatness. Reason, in him, is not supreme and final. His understanding is not himself. These are solely the means of something higher. for our defence of lence, should call glory. That glor religious educati renown. Intellig sustain it. The pires will do it j your understandi shall hear all ti great nation is The keeping o' charge. We means are sin vert them. To lity. “Righ a reproach to There is which may re small weight With machi closely press nical power. hereafter, if A leisure v strict his 1. is to oppr his capita be so mu his anim

ht, and their spirit steadfast with God, impress the ncy of the childhood of this. “Whom shall we h knowledge 2 and whom shall we make to underld doctrine 2 them that are weaned from the milk, l drawn from the breasts.” + It is unjust to appeal to the present state of things, d to deduce from it the futility of the hopes which ve been entertained as to the benefits of education. lucation has not had its trial. Our people have it been taught. We can prove that, in the districts f this country where instruction most prevails, there re the fewest and the lightest crimes. No reasonable oubt can exist that this will be found equally true, wherever knowledge, Christian as well as lettered, preads. The moral nature of man must remain the same. We see that the same may be affirmed of the most favoured classes. We expect not the cessation of evil from any such cause. But we must be permitted to protest against the supposed failure of an experiment which has not been made. As well might it be averred, that the diving-bell had not succeeded in its intention, notwithstanding that it had recovered as much of the sunken wreck as it could contain, because it had not swept all the depths nor exhausted all the treasures of the sea.

* Isa. xxviii. 9.

They are only seen in their right place when subordinated to religion. This is the end and good of man. The moral nature then finds that which can satisfy it. It wields both reason and understanding, but as the instruments with which it seeks first “the kingdom of God and his righteousness." This is the use of reason, this is the reward of understanding. Man is now himself. His essence is evolved. His immortality is ascendant. His spirit has overcome. We are not to be hampered in our view of the advantages attendant on education, by confining them to the present life. Let us think of man as religiously accountable to God, and follow him to the “great white throne.” The labouring classes find few opportunities of intellectual culture, and hear but feeble warnings of religion. Their too common condition not only disqualifies them for the pleasures of literary and philosophical attainment, but their habits leave them in ignorance of the Christian salvation. It is that “no vision” in which “the people perish :” it is that “ lack of knowledge for which they are destroyed.” “To give knowledge of salvation by the remission of their sins through the tender mercy of our God, whereby the dayspring from on high hath visited us,” must surely be our duty. This is the portion of the soul, of which it cannot be disinherited. We cannot begin too soon with the infant mind in these inculcations. Let him who would see another generation, not stubborn and rebellious, but setting their heart

aright, and their spirit steadfast with God, impress the

infancy of the childhood of this. “Whom shall we

teach knowledge 2 and whom shall we make to understand doctrine 2 them that are weaned from the milk, and drawn from the breasts.” +

It is unjust to appeal to the present state of things, and to deduce from it the futility of the hopes which have been entertained as to the benefits of education. Education has not had its trial. Our people have not been taught. We can prove that, in the districts of this country where instruction most prevails, there are the fewest and the lightest crimes. No reasonable doubt can exist that this will be found equally true, wherever knowledge, Christian as well as lettered, spreads. The moral nature of man must remain the same. We see that the same may be affirmed of the most favoured classes. We expect not the cessation of evil from any such cause. But we must be permitted to protest against the supposed failure of an experiment which has not been made. As well might it be averred, that the diving-bell had not succeeded in its intention, notwithstanding that it had recovered as much of the sunken wreck as it could contain, because it had not swept all the depths nor exhausted all the treasures of the sea.

* Isa. xxviii. 9.

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