Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

The section relating to the canal.

Every person entitled to vote under the provisions of this constitution, as defined in the article in relation to "suffrage," shall be entitled to vote for the adoption or rejection of this constitution, and for or against the articles, sections and questions aforesaid, separately submitted; and the said qualified electors shall vote at the usual places of voting, unless otherwise provided, and the said elections shall be conducted, and returns thereof made, according to the laws now in force regulating general elections, except that no registry shall be required at said election; Provided, however, that the polls shall be kept open for the reception of ballots until sunset of said day of election.

$ 9. The Secretary of State shall, at least twenty days before said election, cause to be delivered to the county clerk of each county, blank poll-books, tally-lists and forms of return and twice the number of properly prepared printed ballots for the said election that there are voters in such county, the expense whereof shail be audited and paid as other public printing ordered by the Secretary of State is, by law, required to be audited and paid; and the several county clerks shall, at least five days before said election, cause to be distributed to the board of election, in each election district, in their respective counties, said blank poll-books, tally-lists, forms of return, and tickets.

§ 10. At the said election the ballots shall be in the following form:

NEW CONSTITUTION TICKET.

For all the propositions on this ticket which are not canceled with ink or pencil; and against all propositions wbich are so canceled.

For the new constitution.
For the sections relating to railroads in the article entitled corporations.
For the article entitled counties.
For the article entitled warehouses.
For a three-fifths vote to remove county seats.
For the sections relating to the Illinois Central railroad.
For the section relating to minority representation.

For the section relating to municipal subscriptions to railroads or private corporations.

For the section relating to the canal.

Each of said tickets shall be counted as a vote cast for each proposition thereon not canceled with ink or pencil, and against each proposition so canceled, and returns thereof shall be made accordingly by the judges of election.

§ 11. The returns of the whole vote cast, and of the votes for the adoption or rejection of this Constitution, and for or against the articles and sections respectively submitted, shall be made by the several county clerks, as is now provided by law, to the Secretary of State, within twenty days after the election; and the returns of the said votes shall, within five days thereafte", be examined and canvassed by the Auditor, Treasurer and Secretary of State, or any two of them, in the presence of the Governor, and proclamation shall be made by the Governor, forth with, of the result of the canvass.

$ 12. If it shall appear that a majority of the votes polled are “for the new Constitution," then so much of this Constitution as was not separately submitted to be voted on by articles and sections shall be the supreme law of the State of Illinois, on and after Monday, the 8th day of August, A. D. 1870; but if it shall appear that a majority of the votes polled were “against the new Constitution,” then so much thereof as was not separately submitted to be voted on by articles and sections shall be null and void. If it shall appear that a majority of the votes polled are “for the sections relating to railroads, in the article entitled 'corporations.'” sections nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen and fifteen, relating to railroads in the said article, shall be a part of the Constitution of this state; but if a majority of said votes are against such sections, they shall be null and void. If a majority of tho votes polled are "for the article entitled 'counties,'” such article shall be a part of

[ocr errors]

the Constitution of this State, and shall be substituted for article seven in the present Constitution, entitled "counties;" but if a majority of said votes are against such article, the same shall be null and void. If a majority of the votes polled are for the article entitled " warehouses,” such article shall be a part of the Constitution of this State; but if a majority of the votes are against said article, the same shall be null and void. If a majority of the votes polled are for either of the sections separately submitted relating respectively to the “Illinois Central railroad,” “minority representation,” “municipal subscriptions to railroads or private corporations," and the "canal," then such of said sections as shall receive such majority shall be a part of the Constitution of this State; but each of said sections so separately submitted, against which, respectively, there shall be a majority of the votes polled, shall be null and void: Provided, that the section relating to “minority representation” shall not be declared adopteil unless the portion of the Constitution not separately submitted to be votod on by articles and sections shall be adopted; and in case said section relating to “minority representation ” shall become a portion of the Constitution, it shall be substituted for sections seven and eight of the legislative articles. If a majority of the votes cast at such election shall be for a three-fifths vote to remove a county seat, then the words "a majority” shall be stricken out of section four of the article on counties, and the words “three-fifths "shall be inserted in lieu thereof; and the following words shall be added to said section, to-wit: “But when an attempt is made to remove a county seat to a point nearer to the centre of a county, then a majority vote only shall be necessary." If the foregoing proposition shall not receive a majority of the votes as aforesaid, then the same shall have no effect whatever.

$ 13. Immediately after the adoption of this Constitution, the Governor and Secretary of State shall proceed to ascertain and fix the apportionment of the State for members of the first house of Representatives under this Constitution. The apportionment shall be based upon the federal census of the year A. D. 1870, of the State of Illinois, and shall be made strictly in accordance with the rules and principles announced in the article on the legislative department of this Constitution : Provided, that in case the federal census aforesaid cannot be ascertained prior to Friday, the 23d day of September, A. D. 1870, then the said apportionment shall be based upon the State census of the year A. D. 1865, in accordance with the rules and principles aforesaid. The Governor shall, on or before Wednesday, the 28th day of September, A. D. 1870, make official announcement of the said apportionment, under the great seal of the State, and one hundred copies thereof, duly certified, shall be forth with transmitted by the Secretary of State to each county clerk for distribution.

$14. The districts shall be regularly numbered by the Secretary of State, cominencing with Alexander County as N. 1, and proceeding thence northwardly through the State, and terminating with the county of Cook; but no county shal be numbered as inore than one district, except the county of Cook, which shall constitute three districts, each embracing the territory contained in the now existing representative districts of said county. And on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, A. D. 1870, the members of the first house of representatives under this Constitution shall be elected according to the apportionment fixed and announced

aforesaid, and shall hold their offices for years, and until their uccessor's shall be elected and qualified.

$ 15. The senate, at its first session under this Constitution, shall consist of fifty members, to be chosen as follows : At the general election held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November, A. D. 1870, two senators shall be elected in districts where term of senators expire on the first Monday of January, A. D. 1871, or where there shall be a vacancy, and in the remaining districts one senator shall be elected. Senators so elected shall hold their office for two years.

$ 16. The general assembly, at its first session held after the adoption of this Constitution, shall proceed to apportlon the State for members of the senate and house of representatives, in accordance with the provisions of the article on thelogislative department.

§ 17. When this Constitution shall be ratified by the people, the governor shall forthwith, after having ascertained the fact, issue writs of election to the sheriffs of the several counties of this state, or in case of vacancies, to the coroners, for the election of all the officers, the time of whose election is fixed by this constitution or schedule, and it shall be the duty of said sheriffs or coroners to give such notice of the time and place of said election as is now prescribed by law.

§ 18. All laws of the State of Illinois, and all official writings, and the executive, legislative and judicial proceedings, shall be conducted, preserved and published in no other than the English language.

§ 19. The general assembly shall pass all laws necessary to carry into effect the provisions of this Constitution.

$ 20. The circuit clerks of the different counties having a population over sixty thousand, shall continue to be recorders (ex officio) for their respective counties under this Constitution, until the expiration of their respective terms.

$ 21. The judges of all courts of record in Cook county shall, in lieu of any salary provided for in this Constitution, receive the compensation now provided by law until the adjourninent of the first session of the general assembly after the adoption of this Constitution.

$ 22. The present judge of the circuit court of Cook county shall continue to hold the circuit court of Lake county until otherwise provided by law.

$ 23. When this Constitutiori shall be adopted, and take effect as the supreme law of the State of Illinois, the two-mill tax provided to be annually assessed and collected upon each dollar's worth of taxable property in addition to all other taxes, as set forth in article fifteen of the now existing Constitution, shall cease to be assessed after the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy.

$ 24. Nothing contained in this Constitution shall be so construed as to deprive the general assembly of power to authorize the city of Quincy to create any indebtedness for railroad or inunicipal purposes, for which the people of said city shall have voted, and to which they shall have given, by such vote, their assent, prior to the thirteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine: Provided, that no such indebtedness so created shall in any part thereof be paid by the State, or from any State revenue, tax or fund, but the same shall be paid, if at all, by the said city of Quincy alone, and by taxes levied upon the taxable property thereof : And provided further, that the general assembly shall have no power in the premises that it could not exercise under the present Constitution of this state.

$ 25. In case this Constitution and the articles and sections submitted separately be adopted, the existing Constitution shall cease in all its provisions ; and in case this Constitution be adopted, and any one or more of the articles or sections submitted separately be defeated, the provisions of the existing Constitution (if any) on the same subject shall remain in force.

$ 26. The provisions of this Constitution required to be executed prior to the adoption or rejection thereof shall take effect and be in force immediately.

Done in convention at the capitol, in the city of Springfield, on the thirteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy, and of the independence of the United States of America the ninety-fourth. THE FOLLOWING AMENDMENT TO SEC. 31, ART. 4, WAS ADOPTED IN 1878:

The General Assembly may pass laws permitting the owrers of lands to construct drains, ditches and levees for agricultural, sanitary, or mining purposes, across the lands of others, and provide for the organization of drainage districts, and vest the corporate authorities thereof with power to construct and maintain levees, drains and ditches, and to keep in repair all drains, ditches, and levees heretofore constructed under the laws of this State, by special assessments upon the property benefited thereby.

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES.

[Went into operation on the first Wednesday in March, 1789.1

PREAMBLE. WE, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

ARTICLE I.

OF THE LEGISLATIVE POWER. SECTION 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. SEC. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State Legislature.

No person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.

Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned ainong the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, threefifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative; and, until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three.

When vacancies happen in the representation from any State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies.

The House of Representatives shall choose their speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment.

OF THE SENATE. SEC. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote.

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every second year; and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the executive thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.

No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen.

The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they shall be equally divided.

The Senate shall choose their other officers, and shall have a President pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or when he shall exercise the office of President of the United States.

The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of tlie members present.

Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit, under the United States; but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment according to law.

MANNER OF ELECTING MEMBERS. Sec. 4. The times, places and manner of holding elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing Senators.

CONGRESS TO ASSEMBLE ANNUALLY. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by law appoint a different day.

POWERS. SEC. 5. Each house shall be the judge of tue elections, returns and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjuurn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, and under such penalties, as each house may provide.

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member.

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may, in their judgment, require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the meinbers of either house on any question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the journal.

Neither house, during the session of Congress, shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting.

COMPENSATION, ETC., OF MEMBERS. SEC. 6. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, except treason, felony and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place.

No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no person holding any office under the United States, shall be a member of either house during his continuance in office.

MANNER OF PASSING BILLS, ETC. Sec. 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments as on other bills.

Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to the President of the United States; if he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objections, to

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »