Изображения страниц
PDF
[ocr errors]

XXX. -
Fitz-Eustace followed him abroad,
And marked him pace the village road,
And listened to his horse's tramp,
Till, by the lessening sound,
He judged that of the Pictish camp
Lord Marmion sought the round.
Wonder it seemed, in the squire's eyes,
That one, so wary held, and wise,_
Of whom 'twas said, he scarce received
For gospel, what the church believed,
Should, stirred by idle tale,
Ride forth in silence of the night,
As hoping half to meet a sprite,
Arrayed in plate and mail.
For little did Fitz-Eustace know,
That passions, in contending flow,
Unfix the strongest mind;

wearied from doubt to doubt to flee,

We welcome fond credulity,
Guide confident, though blind.

XXXI.
Little for this Fitz-Eustace cared,
But, patient, waited till he heard,
At distance, pricked to utmost speed,
The foot-tramp of a flying steed,
Come town-ward rushing on:

First, dead, as if on turfit trod,
Then, clattering on the village road,
In other pace than forth he yode,”
Returned Lord Marmion.
Down hastily he sprung from selle,
And, in his haste, well nigh he fell;
To the squire's hand the rein he threw,
And spoke no word as he withdrew;
But yet the moonlight did betray,
The falcon crest was soiled with clay;
And plainly might Fitz-Eustace see,
By stains upon the charger's knee,
And his left side, that on the moor
He had not kept his footing sure.
Long musing on these wondrous signs;
At length to rest the squire reclines,
Broken and short; for still, between,
Would dreams of terror intervene:
Eustace did ne'er so blithely mark
The first notes of the morning lark.

* Used by old poets for went,

END OF CANTO THIRB.

MARMTIONo

CANTO FOURTH,

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

TO

JAMES SKENE, Esq.

.Ashestiel, Ettricke Forest,

An ancientminstrel sagely said,
“Where is the life which late we led?”
That motley clown, in Arden wood,
Whom humorous Jaques with envy viewed,
Note'en that clown could amplify,
On this trite text, so long as I.
Eleven years we now may tell,
Since we have known each other well;
Since, riding side by side, our hand
First drew the voluntary brand;
And sure, through many a varied scene,
Unkindness never came between.
Away these winged years have flown,
To join the mass of ages gone;
And though deep marked, like all below,
With chequered shades of joy and wo;
Though thou o'er realms and seashast ranged,
Marked cities lost, and empires changed,
While here, at home, my narrower ken
Somewhat of manners saw, and men;

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »