Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

SON G XVII.

BY THE EARL OF DORSET,

L

ET the ambitious ever find

Success in crouds and noise, While gentle love does fill my mind

With filent real joys.

Let knaves and fools grow rich and great,

And the world think them wise, While I lye at my Nannys feet,

And all that world despise.

Let conquering kings new trophies raise,

And melt in court delights :
Her eyes can give much brighter days,

Her arms much softer nights.

SONG XVIII.

A TRANSLATION

FROM SAPPHO.

BY AMBROSE PHILIPS ESQ.

B В

LESS’D as th' immortal gods is he,

The youth who fondly fits by thee, And hears and sees thee all the while Softly speak and sweetly smile. .

'Twas

'Twas this depriv'd my soul of rest,
And rais’d such tumults in my breast;
For while I gaz’d, in transport toss’d,
My breath was gone, my voice was loft.

My bosom glow'd; the subtile flame
Ran quick through all my vital frame;
O’er my dim eyes a darkness hung,
My ears with hollow murmurs rung.

In dewy damps my limbs were chill'd,
My blood with gentle horrors thrillid;
My feeble pulse forgot to play,
I fainted, sunk, and died away.

SONG XIX.

IN IMITATION OF CORNELIUS GALLUS.

BY THE EARL OF ROCHESTER,

[ocr errors]

Y goddess Lydia, heav'nly fair,

As lilies sweet, as soft as air; Let loose thy tresses, spread thy charms, And to my love give fresh alarms.

O let me gaze on those bright eyes,
Though facred lightning from them flies :
Show me that soft, that modest grace,
Which paints with charming red thy face.

Give me Ambrosia in a kiss,
That I may rival Jove in bliss;
That I may mix my soul with thine,
And make the pleasure all divine.

O hide thy bofoms killing white,
(The milky way is not so bright)
Left you my ravish'd soul oppress,
With beautys pomp and sweet excess.

Why draw'st thou from the purple flood
Of
niy

kind heart the vital blood ? hou art all over endless charms; O! take me, dying, to thy arms.

SONG XX.

O ,

N Belvideras bosom lying,

Wihing, panting, fighing, dying;
The cold regardless maid to move

With unavailing pray’rs I sue ;
You first have taught me how to love,

Ah! teach me to be happy too.

But she, alas! unkindly wise,
To all my sighs and tears replies,
'Tis every prudent maids concern

Her lovers fondness to improve;
If to be happy you should learn,

You quickly would forget to love.

SONG

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

TH

HE bird that hears her nestlings cry,

And flies abroad for food,
Returns impatient through the sky,

To nurse the callow brood.
The tender mother knows no joy,

But bodes a thousand harms,
And fickens for the darling boy,

While absent from her arms.

Such

Such fondness with impatience join'd

My faithful bosom fires;
Now forc'd to leave my fair behind,
The queen of my

desires!
The powers of verfe too languid prove,

All fimiles are vain,
To show how ardently I love,

Or to relieve my pain.

The faint with fervent zeal inspir'd

For heav'n and joys divine,
The faint is not with raptures fir’d

More pure, more warm than mine.
I take what liberty I dare ;

"Twere impious to say more :
Convey my longings to the fair,

The goddess I adore.

SON G XXIII.

BY THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM.

ROM all uneasy paffions free,

Revenge, ambition, jealousy,
Contented, I had been too bleft,
If love and you had let me rest :
Yet that dull life I now despise ;

Safe from your eyes
I fear'd no griefs, but then I found no joys.

Amidst

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »