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SONG XII.

THE RECONCILEMEN T.

BY THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM,

COM

OME, let us now resolve at last

To live and love in quiet:
We'll tie the knot so very fast,

That time shall ne'er untie it.

The truest joys they feldom prove,

Who free from quarrels live; 'Tis the most tender

part

of love Each other to forgive.

When least I seem'd concern'd, I took

No pleasure, nor no rest;
And when I feign'd an angry look,
Alas! I lov'd you

best.

Say but the fame to me, you'll find

How bleft will be our fate;
Oh, to be happy, to be kind,

Sure, never is too late.

SONG

SONG XIII.

BY MR. CON GRE V E.

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ALSE though she be to me and love,

I'll ne'er pursue revenge ;
For ftill the charmer I

approve,
Though I deplore her change.

In hours of bliss we oft have met,

They could not always last;
And though the present I regret,

I'm grateful for the past.

SONG XIV.

BY MR. ADDISON".

IF

F 'tis joy to wound a lover,

How much more to give him ease,
When his passion you discover ?

Ah! how pleasing 'tis to please :
The bliss returns, and we receive
Transports greater than we give.

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* In the opera of Rosamond.

14

SONG

SONG

XV.

LO V E

FOR LO V E.

BY SIR FULKE GRE VILL, LORD BROOKE.

A

WAY with these self-loving lads,

Whom Cupids arrow never glads !
Away poor souls, that sigh and weep,
In love of those that lie asleep!

For Cupid is a merry god,
An forceth none to kiss the rod.

Sweet Cupids shafts like destiny
Do causeless good or ill decree ;
Desert is borne out of his bow,
Reward upon his wing doth go!

What fools are they that have not known,
That Love likes no laws þut his own

My songs they be of Cynthias praise,
I wear her rings on holidays,
In every tree I write her name,
And every day I read the fame.

Where Honour Cupids rival is
There miracles are seen of his !

If Cynthia crave her ring of me,
I blot her name out of the tree:
If doubt do darken things held dear,
Then well-fare nothing once a year!

For many run, but one muft win!
Fools only hedge the cuckow in!

The

The worth that worthiness should move
Is love, that is the bow of Love;
And love as well the fofter can,
As can the mighty noble-man.

Sweet faint, 'tis true, you worthy be:
Yet, without love, nought worth to me.

SONG XVI.

BY JOHN. BULTE EL*,

C Truly to know each others breaft;

NHLORIS, 'twill be for eithers rest

Truly to know each others breast;
I'll make th'obscurest part

of mine
Transparent, as I would have thine:

If you will deal but so with me,
We foon shall part, or foon agree.

Know then, though you were twice as fair,
If it could be, as now you are ;
And though the graces of your mind
With a resembling luftre fhin'd;

Yet, if you lov'd me not, you'd see
I'd value those as you

do me,

* A person, of whom, it is believed, nothing more is known, than that he was the collector of a small miscellany, published about the middle of the last century, whence this and another song are extracted, both of which were ascribed to him by manuscript notes in a copy the editor has seen : it was therefor but justice to prefix his name.

Though

Though Ila thousand times had sworn
My passion should transcend your scorn;
And that your bright triumphant eyes
Create a fame that never dies;

Yet, if to me you prov'd untrue,
Those oaths should prove as false to you.

If love I vow'd to pay for hate,
'Twas, I confess, a mere deceit;
Or that my flame should deathless prove,
'Twas but to render so your love :

I bragg'd as cowards use to do,
Of dangers they'll ne'er run into.

If you

And now my tenets I have show'd,

think them too great a load ; T'attempt your change were but in vain, The conquest not being worth the pain :

With them I'll other nymphs subdue ;
'Tis too much to lose time and you.

SON G XVII.

BY MR. DRYDEN *,

F

AIR Iris I love, and hourly I die,

But not for a lip, nor a languising eye;
She's fickle and false, and there we agree,
For I am as falle and as fickle as she;

In the comedy of Amphitryon.

We

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