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17. The duties of the board appointed to superintend the elections.

This board, having the custody of the list of registered voters in the district for which it is constituted, must see that the name of the person offering to vote is found upon the registration list, and if such proves to be the fact, it is the duty of the board to receive his vote. They cannot receive the vote of any, person whose name is not upon the list, though he may be ready to take the registration oath, and although he may satisfy them that he was unable to have his name registered at the proper time, in consequence of absence, sickness, or other cause.

The board cannot enter into any inquiry as to the qualifications of any person whose name is not on the list, or as to the qualifications of any person whose Dame is on the list.

18. The mode of voting is provided in the act to be by ballot. The board will keep a record and poll-book of the election, showing the votes, list of voters, and the persons elected by a plurality of the votes cast at the election, and make returns of these to the commanding general of the district.

19. The board appointed for registration and for superintending the elections must take the oath prescribed by the act of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, entitled “ An act to prescribe an oath of office.” I have the honor to be, with great respect,

HENRY STANBERY,

Attorney General. The PRESIDENT.

0

CONGRESS

MESSAGE

FROM THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

COMMUNICATING,

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 8th instant, information in

relation to correspondence between the Department of State and the Hon. Lewis D. Campbell, late minister of the United States to Mexico.

JULY 16, 1867.-Read, ordered to lie on the table and be printed.

Department of State,

Washington, July 12, 1867. The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the Senate of the 8th instant, requesting the President, " if not incompatible with the public interest, to transmit to the Senate all the official correspondence between the Department of State and the Hon. Lewis D. Campbell, late minister of the United States to the republic of Mexico, from the time of his appointment; also the correspondence of the department with his successor," has the honor to report that, in compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 3d instant, of the same tenor, all the correspondence called for by the resolution of the Senate has already been laid before the President for transmission to the House of Representatives. Respectfully submitted.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. The PRESIDENT.

To the Senate of the United States :

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 8th instant, requesting me to transmit “all the official correspondence between the Department of State and the Hon. Lewis D. Campbell, late minister of the United States to the republic of Mexico, from the time of his appointment; also the correspondence of the department with his successor," I communicate, herewith, a report on the subject from the Secretary of State, from which it appears that the correspondence called for by the Senate has already been communicated to the House of Representatives.

ANDREW JOHNSON. WASHINGTON, July 12, 1867.

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A copy of a convention between the United States of America and the republic

of Venezuela for the adjustment of claims of citizens of the United States on The government of that republic.

JULY 16, 1867.—Read, referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations and ordered to be

printed.

To the Senate and House of Representatives :

I transmit to Congress a copy of a convention between the United States and the republic of Venezuela for the adjustment of claims of citizens of the United States on the government of that republic. The ratifications of this convention were exchanged at Caracas on the tenth of April last. As its first article stipulates that the commissioners shall meet in that city within four months from that date, the expediency of passing the usual act for the purpose of carrying the convention into effect will, of course, engage the attention of Congress.

ANDREW JOHNSON. WASHINGTON, July 5, 1867.

Convention between the United States of America and the Republic of Venezuela,

concluded at Caracas April 25, 1866; proclaimed by the President of the United States May 29, 1867.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA :

A PROCLAMATION. Whereas a convention between the United States of America and the republic of Venezuela was concluded and signed by their respective plenipotentiaries at the city of Caracas, on the twenty-fifth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six, which convention, being in the English and Spanish languages, is, word for word, as follows:

The conclusion of a convention simi- Habiéndose propuesto al Gobierno de lar to those entered into with other parte de los Estados Unidos de América, republics, and by which the pending como medio de considerar y resolver en American claims upon Venezuela might justicia las reclamaciones pendientes de be referred for decision to a mixed com- ciudadanos de ellos contra los Estados mission and an umpire, having been Unidos de Venezuela, la celebracion de proposed to the Venezuelan govern- un convenio análogo á los ajustados con ment,, on behalf of the United States otras repúblicas, y por el cual se pone la

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