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President Juarez for his information, together with your recommendation that unless there should be some objection, it should be made known to Maximilian.

I have the honor to say to you in response, that this very day I transmitted the letter mentioned from you to the department of foreign relations of the Mexican republic, my communication having gone by telegraph to New Orleans, where it would 'reach in time to go on to-morrow by the steamer which plies weekly to Matamoras.

In the same manner I sent on the 15th instant your memorandum of that date, in which you make known to me that the Emperor of the French and the Queen of England had addressed the government of the United States requesting it to interpose its kind offices in favor of Maximilian. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. ROMERO. Hon. William H. SEWARD, fr. 8c. gc.

Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Romero.

DEPARTMENT OF State,

IVashington, June 22, 1867. Sir: This department has this day received authentic information that the imperial family of Austria consents to the eventual reintegration of Prince Maximilian. You will oblige me by communicating this to your government in the same way that similar information was recently communicated.

I avail myself of the occasion, sir, to offer to you a renewed assurance of my very high consideration.

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary. Señor Don Matias ROMERO, 8c., fc., 8c.,

Washington, D. C.

Mr. Romero to Mr. F. W. Seward.

[Translation.]

Mexican LEGATION IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Washington, June 22, 1867. Mr. Assistant SECRETARY OF State: I have the honor to acknowledge the reception of your note of this date, informing me that "your department has received authentic information that the imperial family of Austria consents to the eventual reintegration of Prince Maximilian,” and requesting me to communicate the fact to my government in the same way that I transmitted recent similar information. In reply, I have the honor to inform you that I sent a translation of your note this day to my government, by telegraph as far as New Orleans, in time for the steamer leaving that port to-day for Matamoras.

I embrace this opportunity to renew to you, sir, the assurances of my distinguished consideration.

M. ROMERO. Frederick W. SEWARD, esq., fc., fr., fc.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Lerdo de Tejada.

[Telegram to care of Ramon S. Diaz, Mexican Consul at New Orleans.—Translation.]

No. 252.]
MEXICAN LEGATION TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Washington, June 15, 1867. Mr. Seward sent me word this morning that he wished to see me at the Department of State at once, and read to me the memorandum of which I send you a translation, by telegraph, to the care of our consul at New Orleans, to avail of this day's steamer. By mail I send further details.

M. ROMERO. The MinisTER OF FOREIGN RELATIONS, Mexico.

[Memorandum.-Translation from the Spanish.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, June 15, 1867. Mr. Seward said he had asked an interview with Mr. Romero for the purpose of telling him the following:

The public papers of Mexico, as well of the republican party as of the interventionists, appear to be engaged with much satisfaction about every incident or circumstance which can be made to appear as proof that the government of the United States seeks or wishes some undue advantage in Mexico, or some undue influence over the republican administration which exists there. These manifestations do not surprise Mr. Seward, although they have no foundation, nor the slightest reason for them. They are nothing more than an unavoidable mode of carrying on the war of parties in Mexico. Mr. Seward desires that the administration of President Juarez may know that besides the Emperor of Austria, the Emperor of France and the Queen of England have had recourse to the United States, each per se, and in a confidential manner, to use the good offices which legitimately they can do or which are in their reach to prevent the execution of Prince Maximilian. The United States have already spoken on this matter with frankness and with profound respect to the government of President Juarez.

The reiteration of these opinions and wishes in a formal manner, by acceding to the desires expressed by the sovereigns of France and of Great Britain, would, perhaps, embarrass the government of President Juarez, and might have for result the hindrance of the humane object which is desired. At the same time Mr. Seward, assuming that the question is not at an end, wishes that President Juarez may be informed of the interest which the European powers before named have expressed in favor of Prince Maximilian.

Mr. Seward believes also that he ought to say, that he does not fear any contingency possible, in virtue whereof any European power may attempt to invade or interfere in future in Mexico, or in any other republican nation on this continent. For this reason he does not think that Mexico need fear any attempt at reprisals on the part of any European powers as a consequence of any ex. treme decision which the Mexican government may take; but at the same time Mr. Seward also believes that a feeling universally favorable, conciliatory, and friendly toward the republic of Mexico, and the other American republics, would probably be the result of the act of clemency and magnanimity which the United States have thought proper to recommend.

Mr. Seward begs Mr. Romero, if it should be compatible with the opinions he bolds about his duty, to make these sentiments known in a private and confidential manner to the government of Mexico.

Mr. Romero to Mr. C. R. S. Diaz.

[Translation. ]

Mexican LEGATION TO The United States of America,

Washington, June 21, 1867. Send to its destination the following telegram :

M. ROMERO. C. RAMON S. Diaz,

In charge of the Mexican Consulate at New Orleans.

No. 262.
Mexican LEGATION TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Washington, June 21, 1867. I send to you by telegraph, and through the consulate of the republic at New Orleans, translation of a note from Mr. Seward, in relation to Maximilian, which was sent to me by the Secretary of State at the moment of setting off from this city with the President.

M. ROMERO. The MINISTER OF FOREIGN RELATIONS, Mexico.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Romero.

[Translated from the Spanish.]

DEPARTMENT OF Srate, June 21, 1867. Esteemed Mr. Romero: I am authorized to inform President Juarez that the Emperor of Austria will reinstate Prince Maximilian in all his rights of succession as Archduke of Austria, as soon as Maximilian may be set at liberty, and should renounce forever all his projects in Mexico.

You will not fail to do me the favor to transmit this message to President Juarez for his information, with the entreaty on my part that if it should not be inopportune it might be communicated to Prince Maximilian for his information. Yours, sincerely,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. Señor Don Matias ROMERO, Sr., fc., fc.

Mr. Romero to Mr. C. R. S. Diaz.

[Translation. ]
MEXICAN LEGATION TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Washington, June 22, 1867. Send to Mr. Lerdo by this day's steamer the enclosed communication, and notify him that Mr. Marcus Otterbourg has been appointed minister of the United States at Mexico.

M. ROMERO. C. RAMON S. Diaz,

In charge of the Mexican Consulate at New Orleans.

No. 268.]
Mexican LEGATION TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Washington, June 22, 1867. I send you, by telegraph, and through our consulate at New Orleans, translation of a note from Mr. Frederick W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State, of this date, in relation to Maximilian.

M. ROMERO. The MINISTER OF FOREIGN RELATIONS, Mexico.

Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Romero.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, June 22, 1867. Sir: This department has this day received authentic information that the imperial family of Austria consents to reinstate, eventually, Prince Maximilian. You will do me the favor to communicate this to your government in the same manner that you recently sent to it similar information.

I avail of this opportunity to offer to you, sir, the reiterated assurances of my highest consideration.

FREDERICK W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary. Señor Don Matias ROMERO, fr., 8c., fr.

[Telegram communicated by Mr. Romero to Mr. Frederick W. Seward, on the 22d of June,

1867.- Translation. ]

San Luis Potosi, May 15, 1867. Señor Don Matias ROMERO:

MY DEAR FRIEND : Queretaro has been taken by assault at eight o'clock this morning. Maximilian, Mejia, and Castillo surrendered at discretion at the Cerry de la Campana, the last point at which they made resistance. I congratulate you on this important event. Send the annexed to my family. Your very affectionate friend,

BENITO JUAREZ.

WASHINGTON, June 22, 1867

A true copy :

IGXO. MARISCAL.

Sent by Mr. Romero. Memorandum of a conversation between the Secretary of State of the United States and the Mexican minister.

WASHINGTON, July 2, 1867. Mr. Romero said that he received this morning a letter from the Mexican gor ernment, dated on the 7th ultimo, covering copies of all the orders issued by the departments of war and state of Mexico in regard to the persons captured at Queretaro, and the trial of Ferdinand Maximilian, Miguel Miramon, and Tomas Mejia, up to that date. Mr. Romero stated what was the disposition made of those persons, and told Mr. Seward that he would be glad to send him copies of said papers should he desire them.

Mr. Seward said that he may, in the future, beg Mr. Romero for copies of those

papers, and others which he might hereafter receive on the same subject

Mr. Seward to Mr. Romero.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, July 3, 1867. The Secretary of State has the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Mr. Romero's "Memorandum of a conversation between the Secretary of State of the United States and the Mexican minister,” and would request an interview with Mr. Romero whenever it may suit Mr. Romero's convenience to call at the department. The Secretary would be pleased to receive copies of the orders referred to in regard to the persons captured at Queretaro.

Mr. Romero to Mr. Seward.

[Translation. 7

Mexican LEGATION IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Washington, July 3, 1867. Mr. Romero received, at five o'clock on the evening of this day, the verbal note which the Secretary of State of the United States addressed to him acknowledging the receipt of the memorandum which Mr. Romero transmitted to him yesterday, and requesting him to send to the Department of State copies of the orders issued by the government of Mexico respecting the persons captured in Queretaro, to which he referred in the said memorandum, and furthermore that he should call and see the Secrrtary of State at his department.

Mr. Romero takes pleasure in acceding to the wishes of Mr. Seward, by enclosing him copies of the documents referred to, and informing him that he will call to-morrow at the Department of State to have the pleasure of seeing him.

The Hon. William H. SEWARD, Sc., 8c.

Documents from the ministry of war.

No. 1.

[Telegram from the camp to San Luis Potosi, received on the 15th of May, 1867, at 4 o'clock

in the evening. ?

To the Citizen Minister of War:

At three o'clock of the morning of this day La Cruz was captured by our forces, which surprised the enemy at that point. Shortly afterwards the garrison of the town was made prisoner, the city occupied by our forces, while the enemy with part of his forces fell back upon the hill of Campana, being successfully beaten by our artillery and thrown into disorder; and finally Maximilian and his generals, Castillo and Mejia, surrendered at discretion, at the said hill, at about eight o'clock this morning.

Be pleased to offer my congratulations to the citizen President on account of this important victory of the national arms.

M. ESCOBEDO.

WASHINGTON, July 3, 1867.

A true copy :

IGNO. MARISCAL, Secretary.

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