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their time and attention. In justice to our manic eight letters, we have penned these youthful friend, we cannot refrain from add- few lines on the philosophy of autographs ; ing that he replied to this missile by a very | not expecting to convert any body, but none polite note, begging pardon for having made the less determined to relieve our mind by so great a mistake, and returning the auto- protesting against the popular fallacy, that graph.

it is a compliment to ask for an autograph. It seems a small matter to take up a pen and trace a certain number of letters on paper ; but how if one does this a dozen times a day? Now, if it would be rather

From the London " Examiner." troublesome to write twelve notes, for the

THE GERMAN CRISIS. sake of signing one's name to each, to gratify the whim of twelve persons whom one A Bout a fortnight since we stated that the has never seen, it is certainly something for balance of power in Europe, lately so seeach of the dozen to ask, and compliance riously menaced, was at least to some extent ought to be somewhat esteemed. Is it so ? restored, and that Austria's over-vaulting Is not the maker of autographs considered ambition had raised up hostility even where rather the obliged party? Let us whisper it had hitherto relied on for support. A to the world that he very seldom feels so, at month since, the tide of reaction was so least after his wings are quilled. Not that strong that both Piedmont and Switzerhe would not be ashamed to refuse, but land were seriously threatened; and it was that he is half ashamed to comply. There is even feared that all the remonstrances of a secret sense of the ridiculous inseparable both France and England would not be able from this affair, except with people hope to preserve the independence and constitulessly sentimental, and a man does not tional rights of these states. All of a sudwillingly come into sentimental relations den we learn that there is a hitch in absowith strangers.

lutist projects, that menaces have ceased, and The truth of this matter, as of many that the despotic powers experience again others of the same kind, is that, in things too great a difficulty in agreeing, to admit connected with the imagination, we cannot of their undertaking a crusade in common force circumstances. If, in our desire to against the liberties of other states. possess a butterfly, we grasp him with main The public, we are sorry to say, are exstrength, that which made him attractive is ceedingly ill-informed as to what is taking gone for ever. There is something furtive place in the affairs of Germany. When about a true autograph; we should come at Prussia and Austria, with their respective it obliquely, and not by direct attack. A allies, were at open variance, the truth oozed name written at the request of a stranger is out from one side or another ; but, since only about as valuable as the same name Manteuffel and Schwarzenberg have laid stamped by machinery. To have any char- their heads so closely together, news has acter, it should have been written in a become mere conjecture. There has also careless or confidential moment, without the been a regular manufacture of forged diplorecollection that there was a collection in the matic and political documents, which have world. As the iron grasp of the daguerre imposed upon the unwary, and much deotype-chair magnetically empties the face stroyed the credit of the journals. One does of all human expression, so does the vice not even know what credence to give to the like compulsion of an abrupt demand turn announcement of the Journal des Débats one's patronymic, with its baptismal addi that the King of Prussia has withdrawn his tions, into a mere row of soulless letters, confidence from Manteuffel, and refused to from which no sane clairvoyant could de sanction the last concessions to Austria. duce any thing.

The move is attributed by the Débats and This is our theory. In practice, we are the l'imes to the resuscitated influence of benignity itself on this point, as many a red Radowitz. morocco volume can testify. In a confiden- / Now, we too have seen letters from Berlin, tial moment, and with our perceptions written by men of influence-such letters, sharpened by an unusual rush for our talis. | that is, as are carried by private hand, for

the Prussian post-office is now far worse to an insignificant number of votes. Accordthan the Austrian. Every letter is opened, ingly the project seems to have been altered; and every word uttered in them is registered and the original seventeen votes, instead of by the police.

dwindling to eleven, as first proposed, are These accounts represent the King of likely, it is thought, to be augmented to onePrussia as completely in the hands, not of and-twenty. Radowitz, but of the Ultras and the Kreuz How this is compatible with admitting Zeitung party. These Winchelseas and Po- Austria and all her outlying provinces into lignacs of Prussia are unswervingly opposed the Confederation, to which the minor to liberalism or constitutional government, princes were opposed, does not appear. but they fully participate in the national Perhaps a compromise has been made. jealousy of Austria, whose ascendency they France and England have both protested : prompt Frederic William to resist, in order and, though mildly worded, their protest to procure a larger share of influence and implies that if the new German Confederapower for the Prussian Monarchy. This is tion comes forward as including Lombardy a kind of opposition to Austria, and this is and Hungary, it, as such, will not be recoga party to carry it on, to which the Emperor nized by the Courts of either France or Enof Russia can have no dislike. Although gland. This is a circumstance that must the Czar would go the length of even march necessarily have a very unsettling effect ing an army to put down or oppose Rado- upon the great pacification which it was the witz and the constitutionalists, he can have promise of Austria, if it succeeded, to accomno objection to a little northern forwardness plish. So much uncertainty, however, still and independence shown by Gerlach. remains about these German proceedings

This, however, will have by no means the and regulations, that we cannot be too much effect of displacing or disgracing Manteuffel. on our guard against the adoption of even This Minister has been nothing else all along apparently authentic reports. than the creature of the Gerlach party, affecting some show of respect for the forms of the Constitution, but directing his policy most unmistakably against it. If the Ger

THE LOVE OF PLEASING. lach or ultra party have won upon the King to insist on a larger share of power in the It may safely be taken for granted, that German Administration, Manteuffel will every one likes to please ; there are hardly very willingly render himself the organ of exceptions to prove the rule. Whatever such demands. Not only this, but it is subtle disguises this love of pleasing may equally probable that Schwarzenberg will put on—however it may borrow roughness, make considerable concessions to them. or carelessness, or egotism, or sarcasm, as its

There can be no doubt, however, that mask—there it is, snug in the bottom of Wurtemberg and Bavaria are exceedingly each human heart, from St. Simeon Stylites discontented with the results of the crusade shivering under the night-dews, to Jenny against Prussia. Bavaria, which hoped to Lind flying from adoring lion-hunters, and rise to first rank by the degradation of Prus- Pio Nono piously tapping his gold snuff-box, sia, is now mortified to find Austria and and saying he is only a poor priest! The Prussia leagued, and disposing between little boy who has committed bis piece with them of the rest of Germany. Wurtemberg, much labor of brain, much screwing of body, which probably expected some portion of and anxious gesticular tuition, utterly reBaden, is in open opposition, and demanding fuses to say it when the time comes. Why? a German Parliament, or the concomitant of Not because he does not wish to please, but the Diet. The two Kings of Hanover and because his intense desire to do so has sudSaxony are said to favor the views of denly assumed a new form, that of fear; Wurtemberg and Bavaria. If so, Austria which, like other passions, is very unreasonwould lose, rather than win, by summoning able. The same cause will make a young the Engere Rath, or Executive Committee lady who has bestowed much thought on a of the Diet: by rendering kings predominant new ball-dress, declare at the last moment, there; and by restricting the minor princes that she does not want to go! A doubt has

suddenly assailed her as to the success of

DIAMOND DUST. ber costume. The dress is surely beautiful, but will it make ber so? No vigor of per

He alone deserves to have any weight or sonal vanity preserves us from these swoons

| influence with posterity, who has shown of self-esteem ; and they are terrible while

himself superior to the particular and prethey last. What wonder, then, that the

dominant error of his own times. thought of a perpetual syncope of that kind REPLying to scurrility, is like the dandy should make us bebave unwisely sometimes ! keeping himself clean by pushing away the - Mrs. Kirkland.

chimney-sweeper.

MASQUERADE-a synonym for life and civ. ilized society.

MEDITATION is the soul's perspective glass. RAPHAEL'S PORTRAIT,

Leisure is a very pleasant garment to

look at, but it is a very bad one to wear. PAINTED BY HIMSELF.

If you apply to little-minded people in (From the Italian.)

the season of distress, their self-importance BEHOLD great Raphael !his ideal see

| instantly peeps forth. E'en in himself !--the mind, the speaking face; | Nothing can poison the contentment of a Gifts he gave back to Nature-ev'n as she

man who cheerfully lives by his labor, but Had gifted him, returning every grace.

to make him rich.

A critic's head should be wise enough to Here once-indignant feeling but to make Immortal on the canvas others still

form a right judgment, and his heart free Himself he drew; what subject could he take, enough to pronounce it. What prodigy more worthy of his skill ?

Never consider a person unfeeling or hard

hearted, because he refuses what he cannot When Death beheld the two, a future day,

reasonably grant. He cried, (the fatal dart suspended high,) * Which is the shade, which substance ?-where

TRUE freedom consists in this that each my prey 9"

man shall do whatever he likes, without in" Take this frail mantle,” was the soul's reply; jury to another. 4 The body take, and let the image stay. We both were born immortal--it and I!"

To-MORROW—the day on which idle men ETA. work and fools reform.

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An extraordinary passage of the American / cargo of the St. Lawrence would fill up: the steamship Pacific within less than ten days, consequence has been a reassignment of a was the subject of much of the metropolitan portion of the space to native exhibitors. talk the past week. This triumph of Amer- This fact, as well as others which have ican naval craft seemed even greater from come to our knowledge, persuade us to think the fact that the fastest vessel of the rival that our country will have less reason to British line, which followed three days after, boast, either by reason of its products, or its occupied some twenty hours more in the zeal, than we could hope. It is not, per

haps, generally known that each nation is The English papers are filled with ac- required to fit up at its own cost, and with counts of the great Exhibition which is now its own style of decoration, the spaces sev. becoming a present business with them, and erally allotted. American exhibitors with is already giving the first tokens of that little unity in their plans, and hurried as plethora of population which it is destined they have been in their preparation, can to create.

hardly pretend to compete in this respect It appears that the space allotted to with the fête-loving artisans of the continent American exhibitors was greater than the of Europe. The Times, in a long descriptive

crossing.

article, gives this notice of the French com- The same paper makes this complacent partment:

| mention of the United States :“Still holding eastward on the left-hand “Our cousins have had their geographical side, and leaving the southern states of position reversed in the Crystal Palace, and Europe behind, the visitor crosses Belgium, occupy the extreme east instead of the half warlike from the display of artillery | far west.' But still their fortunes in part and arms, aod enters on the territory of ma attend them, and they find themselves Tobelle France. Our neighbors are now thor cated in a territory larger than they can oughly in earnest about their preparations. | occupy. 'Annexation, however, is not their and every day make considerable progress. passion in Hyde park, and finding that the Quiet, active-looking workmen, bearded and l space assigned to them by the Royal Combloused, and forming a striking contrast to mission is larger than they want, they have our mechanics in appearance, ply with as very properly given up what they did not siduity and an air of great intelligence the require. The consequence is, that some of tasks severally assigned to them. On the our native exhibitors will emigrate to their north side of their allotment a considerable

end of the building; and when the opening quantity of stationary machinery has already of the Exhibition takes place visitors will been fixed. Handsome oak stalls, neatly find distinct traces of that movement which inscribed with the names of exhibitors, are is continually augmentiug the resources of run up with great rapidity, and against the the Western world from the superabundant boarding which separates the one-half of the population of the mother country. The space from the central avenue the process of process of unpacking has commenced in the sign-painting is carried on in every variety / United States compartment, but the articles of color and every imaginable kind of displayed consist chiefly of ploughs and ground. In the nave M. de Seigneur, with other agricultural implements. The show a band of assistants, incessantly labors at his of 'Yankce notions' will be examined with group of St. Michael and Satan; and under great interest by the public, and we trust his continuous efforts the enemy of mankind not without a kindly feeling towards the becomes every day more hideous and the exhibitors and towards the struggling inArchangel more seraphic. The work prom- dustry of a great and young community ises, when completed, to be a fine French sprung from our loins." impersonation of Milton's conception. Mi

- The Miss Talbot, of whom there has chael, but for his wings, would pass for Joan of Arc, and the enemy of mankind has his

been latterly much mention in the London attributes of horns, cloven foot, and tail dis. Journals, as the victim of priestly seduction, tinctly developed. A little beyond this has made her appearance at length in the group another aspirant for artistic fame town; and by report, is engaging in the makes rapid progress with his work. The

be gayest festivities of the season. Punch and subject is Godfrey of Bouillon, the great crusader, mounted on a gigantic charger. the Jesuits together have made her the The body of the horse has been completed, I lionne of every salon. but his legs have still to be supplied; and - The Times indulges in a strain of seated in the interior of the rider, whose irony in reply to a flimsy article of the Newfigure has only been put together up to the York Herald, in reference to a new revoluwaist, the artist or some one of his assistants may be observed quietly building up the

Is tion. The Times intimates that there are shoulders and chest of the first Christian no special fears of a descent of the socialists King of Jerusalem. Our neighbors are, with upon Manchester; and that there is no intheir usual tact, preserving wide passages crease proposed at present of the standing for the circulation of the crowds who will

army. visit their space; and while they have adopted the general system of distribution

- A recent criminal trial in England recommended by the Commissioners, the has attracted considerable attention, and showy character of their display will enable is the subject of one or two strong them to give it increased effect. The silks articles in the leading papers. The point of Lyons, the tapestry of the Gobelins, the

which has excited discussion, is the virtual carpets of Aubusson, the porcelain of Sèvres, and the fancy cabinet-work, bronzes, and

escape of the real culprit-Smith, who gave jewelry of Paris, will show magnificently

evidence for the crown ;-while his accomwhen concentrated on either side of the nave. plices—Harwood & Jones,—who prove to We understand that the fittings of the whole have been ignorant dupes, suffer the full compartment are to be of the most costly | penalty of the law. The Times makes the and tasteful description, and so far have they been carried that there is some danger of the

the following remarks thereupon :

Orowing remarks French exhibition being late."

| “We cannot imagine a more injudicious

use of the power of admitting accomplices to of March. The drive along the banks of betray the secrets of their companions in the Loire from Tours to the Chateau d'Amcrime. Perhaps it may be urged that the boise is more grand and vast than actually admitting an accomplice to give evidence is picturesque. The two fine stone bridges, at all times a most unwelcome and distaste- and a third on the suspension principle, are ful expedient, only to be resorted to or striking objects in the route. The town of justified by necessity, and that where that Amboise is a second-rate old French country necessity exists such a practice tends to town, consisting of a collection of houses, prevent the perpetration of crime by sowing with narrow, dirty streets. The chateau mutual distrust among its perpetrators and rises from a very lofty height or rock close by preventing their ultimate impunity. We to the Loire, on the right bank of the river. may grant this ; but where was the necessity | To enter the castle here is a steep zig-zag here? In the first place, the approver was, carriage way from the bottom of a very as we have shown, not likely to be believed, dirty, narrow lane; and, indeed, though it nor, indeed, deserving belief from a jury; was partially opened for Lady Londonderry, and, in the next place, except as to the I question much if the Emir himself, on his matter of the fatal shot and the incrimination arrival at his prison, did not enter it on foot. of Samuel Harwood, he did not carry the By some confusion as to the day of our case any further than the circumstantial arrival, (we espied our annonce unopened on evidence and the direct testimony of Mrs. | the commandant's table, interspersed with Hollest. The result has proved that the various other papers, inkstands, pens, cigars, admitting Hiram Smith as an approver was &c.,) we were not only kept for a long unnecessary; for the jury, totally disbeliev- period in the street, but when arrived at ing him, and putting his evidence aside as of the summit of the Castle-terrace we were no value whatever, has yet found sufficient hustled into a small, cold chapel, where it evidence to convict Harwood and Jones. was proposed we should await the comThe judge has not hesitated to sentence mandant's arrival. The day not being propithem on that evidence, and the Secretary of tious, we were all shivering from the cold. State is most properly about to suffer the At length the Algerine capitaine appeared law to take its course. The admission, by whom we were introduced to a suite of therefore, of such a person as Hiram Smith three or four very dirty and close waitingas an approver, the placing him before a rooms, the end one of which, where we at jury as a person on whose evidence any one last arrived, appeared to be the sanctum in any matter would be justified in reposing sanctorum of this very ill-accommodated the slightest reliance is a most deplorable guard. All sorts of writing inaterials in error in itself, and one which in its conse confusion covered small tables-bird-cages, quences tends to bring contempt on the dirty books, and a few old chairs alone administration of justice, and bas caused no graced the saloon of the unhappy guard ; little risk of defeating its ends altogether.” and while we were asked to sit down for - Every one has heard the story of

another balf-hour's waiting, the command

ant, a most obliging officer, bad the great ABDEL-KADER the African Emir, who was

civility himself to set to work, with some taken captive at one of the French victories matches and dry sticks, to kindle a fire in in Algeria ; and who has ever since been in | a white china clay stove, which formed the close confinement, notwithstanding a direct only and somewhat awkward embellishment pledge to the contrary from the general to

in the centre of the room. At length an

Algerian slave appeared to conduct us to whom his surrender was made. It appears Abu-el-Kader's apartments. This man was that Lord LONDONDERRY has been latterly dressed in the costume worn by the native making an effort in his favor, through direct Moors at Tangiers, and reminded mo much petition to Louis NAPOLEON. The President of our former friends when campaigning in

the East. We followed this guide, and he declines acceding to the petition from a fear

led us through the winding terraces of the for the security of his Algerine possessions, garden, which are clothed with tall cypress and the poor Emir still solaces himself as and other trees, to the most elevated part he best can, with his pipes and his wives of the chateau, when, passing through an An account of the visit of Lord LONDON- outward ante-hall or guard-chamber, we

came to a door where all shoes, &c., were DERRY is worth quoting :

left. Upon this door being thrown open “ Before leaving Paris I applied to the the interesting old warrior stood before us. Minister at War to have permission from His bourmoose is as white as the driven the President and the Government to pre snow, bis beard as black as jet, his project. sent my respects to the ex-Emir. There ing buge eyebrows of the same hue, with was some delay in obtaining the order of teeth like ivory, and most expressive dark admission, I know not from what cause; but eyes, showing peculiarly the white liquid it at length reached me at Tours on the 5th | tinge surrounding the pupils. His stature

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