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CONTENTS.

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PAGE

Inscription on the Monument of a Newfound-

land Dog :

896

To a Lady, on being asked my Reason for

quitting England in the Spring

896

Remind me not, remind me not

897

There was a Time, I need not Name

897

And wilt thou weep when I am low?

897

Fill the Goblet again.

897

Stanzas to a Lady, on leaving England

898

Lines to Mr. Hodgson .

899

Lines written in an Album, at Malta

900

To Florence.

900

Stanzas composed during a Thunder-storm 900

Stanzas written in passing the Ambracian Gulf 901

The Spell is broke, the Charm is flown!. .

901

Written after swimming from Sestos to Abydos 901

Lines in the Travellers' Book at Orchomenas 902

Paraphrase from the opening Lines of the

Medea of Euripides .

902

Epitaph

902

Substitude for an Epitaph

902

Translation of the famous Greek War Song,

Δεύτε παίδες” &c.

903

Translation of the Romaic Song ,

«'Επαινω

μες&c.

903

Maid of Athens, ere we part

904

Lines written beneath a Picture.

904

On Parting

905

Epitaph for Joseph Blackett, late Poet and

Shoemaker

905

Farewell to Malta

905

To Dives.

906

On Moore's last Operatic Farce, or Farcical

Opera

906

Epistle to a Friend

906

To Thyrza

907

Stanzas

907

Euthanasia

908

Stanzas

909

On a Cornelian Heart which was broken 910

Lines to a Lady weeping.

910

From the French

910

The Chain I gave

910

Lines written on a Blank

910

Address, spoken at the Opening of Drury-

Lane Theatre

911

Parenthetical Address, by Dr. Plagiary

912

Verses found in a Summer House at Hales-Owen 912

Remember Thee! Remember Thee!

912

On Lord Elgin

913

To Time

913

Translation of a Romnaic Love Song

913

Stanzas

914

.

.

.

.

892

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PACE

PAGE

On the Birth of John William Rizzo Hoppner 944

914

New Duet

944

914

Ode on Venice

945

914

Stanzas to the Po

946

915

Epigram from the French of Rulhières

917

915

Sonnet to George the Fourth

947

915

Stanzas

917

915

On my Wedding Day .

948

916

Epitaph for William Pilt

948

916

Epigram

948

916

On some Brother Poets

918

917

Impromptu

948

917

To Mr. Murray

949

920

The Irish Avatar

949

Sonnet to Samuel Rogers, Esq.

950

920

Francesca da Rimini

951

921

Francesca of Rimini

951

921

Stanzas

952

922

Epigram on my Wedding Day

953

On my Thirty-third Birth Day

953

922

Martial, Lib. I. Epig. I.

953

922

On Queen Caroline

953

923

Epigram

953

923

John Keats

953

924

Stanzas, written on the Road between Florence

925

and Pisa

953

925

Epigrams

954

926

Epitaph

954

927

To Mr. Murray

954

928

The Charity Ball

954

928

Elegy on the Recovery of Lady ****

954

929

Song

955

930

Stanzas

955

932

The Conquest

956

934

To

956

935

On Sam Rogers

956

936

On Lady Milbanke's Dog Trim

957

936

Lines to Lady Holland

957

937

On this Day I complete my Thirty-sixth Year 957

937

To Jessy . .

957

938

Lines found in the Travellers' Book at Cha-

938

mouni

958

938

To Lady Caroline Lamb

958

939

The Prince of Whales .

958

939

To my dear Mary Anne

959

939

Stanzas

959

941

On the Letter I

959

941

942

PIECES IN PROSE.

942 Review of Wordsworth's Poems.

960

942 Review of Gell's Geography of Ithaca . 961

942 Parliamentary Speeches

967

942 A Fragment

975

942 Two Epistles from the Armenian Version of

913 the New Testament

978

913 | Letter on Bowles's Strictures on Pope. 950

944 | A Second Letter on Bowles's Strictures on

944

Pope . .

992

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THE LIFE OF LORD BYRON,

BY THOMAS MOORE, ESQ.

In Doomsday-book, the name of Ralph de Burun Saracen or Moor, with a European female on one ranks high among the tenants of land in Notting- side of him, and a Christian soldier on the other. hamshire ; and in the succeeding reigns, under in a second group, which is in one of the bedthe title of Lords of Horestan Castle, we find his rooms, the female occupies the centre, while on descendants holding considerable possessions in each side is the head of a Saracen, with the eyes Derbyshire, to which afterwards, in the time of fixed earnestly upon her. Of the exact meaning of Edward I., were added the lands of Rochdale in these figures there is nothing certain known; but Lancashire. So extensive, indeed, in those early the tradition is, I understand, that they refer to times, was the landed wealth of the family, that the some love-adventure, in which one of those crusapartition of their property, in Nottinghamshire ders, of whom the young poet speaks, was engaged. alone, has been sufficient to establish some of the Of the more certain, or at least better known, exfirst families of the county.

ploits of the family, it is sufficient perhaps to say, Its antiquity, however, was not the only distinc- that, at the siege of Calais under Edward III., and tion by which the name of Byron came recom- on the fields, memorable in their respective eras, mended to its inheritor; those personal merits and of Cressy, Bosworth, and Marston Moor, the name accomplishments, which form the best ornament of of the Byrons reaped honours, both of rank and a genealogy, seem to have been displayed in no or- fame, of which their young descendant has, in the dinary degree by some of his ancestors. In one of verses just cited, shown himself proudly conscious. his own early poems, alluding to the achievements It was in the reign of Henry VIII., on the dissoluof his race, he commemorates with much satisfaction of the monasteries, that, by a royal grant,

the tion, those “mail-cover'd barons” among them, church and priory of Newstead, with the lands ad who proudly to balile

joining, were added to the other possessions of the Led their vassals from Europe lo Palestine's plain;

Byron family. The favourite, upon whom these Adding,

spoils of the ancient religion were conferred, was Near Askalon's towers John of Horiston slumbers, the grand-nephew of the gallant soldier who fought Underved is the hand of his minstrel by death.

by the side of Richmond at Bosworth, and is disAs there is no record, however, as far as I can tinguished from the other knights of the same Chrisdiscover, of any of his ancestors having been en- tian name, in the family, by the title of “ Sir John gaged in the Holy Wars, it is possible that he may Byron the Little with the great beard." A portrait have had no other authority for this notion than the of this personage was one of the few family pictradition which he found connected with certain tures with which the walls of the abbey, while in strange groups of heads, which are represented on the possession of the noble poet, were decorated. the old panel-work in some of the chambers at At the coronation of James I., we find another reNewstead. In one of these groups, consisting of presentative of the family selected as an object of three heads, strongly carved and projecting from royal favour, the grandson of Sir John Byron the the panel, the centre figure evidently represents a Little being, on this occasion, made a Knight of the

his

Bath. There is a letter to this personage, preserved land can boast,“his mother, who was one of the in Lodge's Illustrations, from which it appears Gordons of Gight, having been a descendant of that, notwithstanding all these apparent indications that Sir William Gordon who was the third son of of prosperity, the inroads of pecuniary embarrass- the Earl of Huntley by the daughter of James I. ment had already begun to be experienced by this After the eventful period of the Civil Wars, when ancient house. After counselling the new heir as so many individuals of the house of Byron distinto the best mode of getting free of his debts, “ I do guished themselves—there having been no less than therefore advise you,"continues the writer,(1)“ that seven brothers of that family on the field at Edgeso soon as you have, in such sort as shall be fit, hill—the celebrity of the name'appears to have died finished your father's funerals, to dispose and dis- away for near a century. It was about the year perse that great household, reducing them to the 1750, that the shipwreck and sufferings of Mr. Bynumber of forty or fifty, at the most, of all sorts ; ron (2) (the grandfather of the illustrious subject of and, in my opinion, it will be far better for you to these pages), awakened in no small degree the atlive for a time in Lancashire rather than in Notts, tention and sympathy of the public. Not long after, for many good reasons that I can tell you when we a less innocent sort of notoriety attached itself meet, fitter for words than writing.

to two other members of the family,-one, the From the following reign (Charles I.) the nobility grand-uncle of the poet, and the other, his father. of the family dates its origin. In the year 1643, Sir The former, in the year 1765, stood his trial before John Byron, great-grandson of him who succeeded the House of Peers for killing, in a duel, or rather to the rich domains of Newstead, was created Ba- scuffle, his relation and neighbour, Mr. Chaworth; ron Byron of Rochdale in the county of Lancaster; and the latter, having carried off to the continent and seldom has a title been bestowed for such high the wife of Lord Carmarthen, on the noble marquis and honourable services as those by which this no- obtaining a divorce from the lady, married her. bleman deserved the gratitude of his royal master. Of this short union one daughter only was the Through almost every page of the History of the issue, the honourable Augusta Byron, now the wife Civil Wars, we trace his name in connexion with of Colonel Leigh. the varying fortunes of the king, and find him faithful, persevering, and disinterested to the last. near and remote, of Lord Byron, it cannot fail 10 “Sir John Biron (says the writer of Colonel Hutch- be remarked how strikingly he combined in his inson's Memoirs), afterwards Lord Biron, and all own nature some of the best and, perhaps, worst his brothers, bred up in arms and valiant men in qualities that lie scattered through the various chatheir own persons, were all passionately the king's." racters of his predecessors—the generosity, the love There is also, in the answer which Colonel Hutch- of enterprise, the high-mindedness of some of the inson, when governor of Nottingham, returned, on better spirits of his race, with the irregular pasone occasion, to his cousin-german, Sir Richard sions, the eccentricity, and daring recklessness of Biron, a noble tribute to the valour and fidelity of the world's opinion, that so much characterized the family. Sir Richard, having sent to prevail on others. his relative to surrender the castle, received for The first wife of the father of the poet having answer, that, except he found his own heart died in 1784, he, in the following year, married prone to such treachery, he might consider there Miss Catharine Gordon, only child and heiress of was, if nothing else, so much of a Biron's blood in George Gordon, Esq. of Gight. In addition to the him, that he should very much scorn to betray or estate of Gight, which had, however, in former times, quit a trust he had undertaken.”

been much more extensive, this lady possessed, Such are a few of the gallant and distinguished in ready money, Bank shares, etc., no inconsiderpersonages, through whom the name and honcurs able property; and it was known to be solely with of this noble house have been transmitted. By the a view of relieving himself from his debts that maternal side also Lord Byron had to pride himself Mr. Byron paid his addresses to her. A circumon a line of ancestry as illustrious as any that Scot-stance related, as having taken place before the

im In reviewing thus cursorily the ancestors, both

(1) The Earl of Shrewsbury.

(2) Aserwards Admiral.

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