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The undersigned desires to obtain, as early as practicable, accurate but condensed information of the designation, history, and present condition of every Institution and Agency of Education in the United States, and of the name, residence, and special work of every person in the administration, instruction, and management of the same. Any response to this Circular in reference to any Institution, Agency, or subject included in the following Schedule, addressed to the Department of Education, Washington, D. C., and indorsed official,is entitled, by direction of the Postmaster General, to be conveyed by mail free of postage, and will be thankfully received by

HENRY BARNARD, Commissioner of Education, Washington, D. C.

SCHEDULE OF INFORMATION SOUGHT RESPECTING SYSTEMS, INSTITUTIONS, AND

AGENCIES OF EDUCATION.

A. General Condition, (of District, Village, City, County, State.)

Territorial Extent, Municipal Organization, Population, Valuation, Receipts, and Expenditures for all public purposes,

B. System of Public Instruction.

C. Incorporated Institutions, and other Schools and Agencies of Education.

I. ELEMENTARY OR PRIMARY EDUCATION.
(Public, Private, and Denominational; and for boys or girls.)
II. ACADEMIC OR SECONDARY EDUCATION.

(Institutions mainly devoted to studies not taught in the Elementary Schools, and to preparation for College or Special Schools.)

III. COLLEGIATE OR SUPERIOR EDUCATION.
(Institutions entitled by law to grant the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science.)
IV. PROFESSIONAL, SPECIAL, OR CLASS EDUCATION.

(Institutions having special studies and training, such as-1. Theology. 2. Law. 3. Media cine. 4. Teaching. 5. Agriculture. 6. Architecture, (Design and Construction.) 7. Technology-Polytechnic. 8. Engineering, (Civil or Mechanical.) 9. War, (on land or sea.) 10. Business or Trade. 11. Navigation. 12. Mining and Metallurgy. 13. Drawing and Painting. 14. Music. 15. Deaf-mutes. 16. Blind. 17. Idiotic. 18. Juvenile offenders. 19. Orpnans 20. Girls. 21. Colored or Freedmen. 22. Manual or Industrial. 23. Not specified abodesuch as Chemistry and its applications—Modern Langunges-Natural History and GeologySteam and its applications, -Pharmacy-Veterinary Surgery, &c.)

V. SUPPLEMENTARY EDUCATION.

1. Sunday and Mission Schools. 2. Apprentice Schools. 3. Evening Schools. 4. Courses of Lectures. 5. Lycevins for Debates. 6. Reading Rooms--Periodicals. 7. Libraries of Reference or Circulation. 8. Gymnasiums, Boat and Ball Clubs, and other Athletic Exercises. 9. Pub lic Gardens, Parks and Concerts. 10. Not specified above.

VI. SOCIETIES, INSTITUTES, MUSEUMS, CABINETS, AND GALLERIES FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND THE ARTS.

VII. EDUCATIONAL AND OTHER PERIODICALS.
VIII. SCHOOL FUNDS AND EDUCATIONAL BENEFACTIONS.
IX. LEGISLATION (STATE OR MUNICIPAL) RESPECTING EDUCATION.
X. SCHOOL ARCHITECTURE.
XII. PENAL AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.
XII. CHURCHES AND OTHER AGENCIES OF RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION.
XIII. REPORTS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS ON SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION.
XIV. MEMOIRS OF TEACHERS, AND PROMOTERS OF EDUCATION.

XV. EXAMINATIONS (COMPETITIVE, OR OTHERWISE) FOR ADMISSION TO NATIONAL OR STATE SCHOOLS, OR TO PUBLIC SERVICE OF ANY KIND.

No. 2.

CIRCULAR RESPECTING PLAN OF PUBLICATION.

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,

Washington, D. C., May, 1867. As at present advised, the following plan of publication will be pursued : I OFFICIAL CIRCULAR.

To be issued monthly_each number to be devoted to such special subject as the correspondence or investigations of the Department may require; and if the requisite clerical labor can be devoted to its preparation, to a monthly summary of Educational Intelligence and Statistics in different States and Countries.

These Circulars will not be printed for general distribution, and as a general rule will be mailed, in answer or inquiry, to correspondents, or to persons known to be or who may write that they are specially interested in the subject.

The matter contained in them will not always be new, but such articles will be introduced from former publications of the Commissioner, as he may think illustrative of the special subject to which the Circular is devoted. IL A QUARTERLY PUBLICATION.

It is proposed to begin a National Series of the American Journal of Educatich, with a view of completing the encyclopediac view of Education—its History, System, Institutions, Principles, Methods and Statistics—begun several years since, and prosecuted thus far with a special reference to the condition and wants of our own schools, and with a studious avoidance of all matters foreign to the main object. The range and exhaustive treatment of subjects can be seen by the Classified Index, which will be forwarded if desired.

Although the Journal will be for the present under the editorial supervision of the Commissioner, it will be entirely the private enterprise of its publisher, who will soon announce his plan and terms.

The Department will be in no way responsible for the matter or the expense, but will avail itself of this mode of printing documents prepared at the request of the Commissioner, which it may be desirable to issue in advance or aside of any other form of publication.

The Numbers will be sent only to subscribers, or to special orders addressed to the Publisher, Hartford, Conn. III. EDUCATIONAL DOCUMENTS.

The Commissioner, with such coöperation as he can enlist, will at once begin the preparation or rather the revision and completion of a series of Educational Documents (A) begun several years ago, after consultation with several of the most eminent educators of the country—each of which will be devoted to an exhaustive treatment of a particular subject. The plan of publication will be set forth in his first Annual Report. IV. AX AXNTAL REPORT.

As ia provided for in the Act establishing this Department, a Report will be submitted to Congress annually, in which the progress and condition of Education in different States and countries during the year will be set forth.

HENRY BARNARD,

Commissioner.

SPARBEDLY

POPULATED DISTRICTS

The American Journal of Education will be found, on examination, to embrace:

1. A CATALOGUE of the best publications on the organization, instruction and discipline of schools, of every grade, and on the principles of education, in the English, French, and German languages.

2. A History of Education, ancient and modern.

3. AN Account OF ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION IN EUROPE, based on the reports of Bache, Stowe, Mann, and others.

4. National EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES ; or contributions to the history and improvement of common or public schools, and other institutions, means and agencies of popular education in the several States

5. SCHOOL ARCHITECTURE ; or the principles of construction, ventilation, warming, acoustics, seating, &c., applied to school rooms, lecture halls, and class rooms, with illustrations.

6. Normal Schools, and other institutions, means and agencies for the pro fessional training and improvement of teachers.

7. System Of Public EDUCATION FOR LARGE CITIES AND VILLAGES, with an account of the schools and other means of popular education and recreation in the principal cities of Europe and in this country.

8. SYSTEM OF POPULAR EDUCATION FOR with an account of the schools in Norway and the agricultural portions of other countries.

9. Schools of Agriculture, and other means of advancing agricultural improvement.

10. Schools of Science applied to the mechanic arts, civil engineering, &c. 11. Schools of Trade, NAVIGATION, COMMERCE, &c.

12. FEMALE EDUCATION, with an account of the best seminaries for females in this country and in Europe.

13. INSTITUTIONS FOR ORPHANS.

14. Schools of INDUSTRY, or institutions for truant, idle or neglected children, before they have been convicted of crime.

15. REFORM Schools, or institutions for young criminals. 16. Houses of Refuge, for adult criminals.

17. Secondary Education, including 1. institutions preparatory to college, and 2. institutions preparatory to special schools of agriculture, engineering, trade, navigation, &c.

18. COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES.
19. Schoolu of Theology, LAW, AND MEDICINE.
20. MILITARY AND NAVAL SCHOOLS.

21. SUPPLEMENTARY EDUCATION, including adult schools, evening schools, courses of popular lectures, debating classes, mechanic institutes, &c.

22. Libraries, with hints for the purchase, arrangement, catalogueing, drawing and preservation of books, especially in libraries designed for popular

use.

23. INSTITUTIONS FOR THE DEAP AND DUMB, BLIND, AND Idiots.

24. SOCIETIES FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF SCIENCE, THE ARTS AND EDUCATION.

25. PUBLIC MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES.
26. Public Gardens, and other sources of popular recreation.

27. Educational Tracts, or a series of short essays on topics of immediate oractical importance to teachers and school officers.

28. EDUCATIONAL Biography, or the lives of distinguished educators and teachers.

29. EDUCATIONAL BENEFACTORS, or an account of the founders and benefactors of educational and scientific institutions.

30. Self-EDUCATION; or hints for self-formation, with examples of the pursuit of knowledge under difficulties.

31. Ilome EducATION; with illustrations drawn from the Family Training of different countries.

32. EducatIONAL NOMENCLATURE AND Index; or an explanation of words and terms used in describing the systems and institutions of education in different countries, with reference to the books where the subjects are discussed and feated of.

The Series, when complete, will constitute an ExcYCLOPEDIA OF EDUCATION.

I. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION.

DOCUMENTARY HISTORY.

ORIGINAL ANNOUNCEMENT.

Lesoed as a Circular in May. 1855, and published in August following, with the first number, ar:d

again with a Postscript in January, 1856.

In the great educational movement now going forward on this Continent, and especially throughout all the states in which the English language prevails, there has seemed for many years to the undersigned to exist, if not a demand, at least the want, not only of an American association of the friends of universal education, but of a series of publications, which should, on the one hand, embody the matured views and varied experience of wise statesmen, educators and teachers in perfecting the organization, administration, instruction and discipline of schools, of every grade, through a succession of years, under widely varying circumstances of government, society and religion; and on the other, should harmonize conflicting views, expose real deficiencies, excite to prudent and efficient action, and serve as a medium of free and frequent communication between the friends of education, in every portion of the great field.

In furtherance of these objects, a Plan of Central Agency for the increase and diffusion of knowledge on this subject was submitted to the American Association for the Advancement of Education, at its annual meeting in Washington in 1854. One feature of this plan was the publication of a Journal and Library of Education ; the former to be issued in monthly or quarterly numbers, to embrace the current educational intelligence of the world, and the discussion of topics of immediate and pressing interest ;—the latter to consist of a series of independent treatises, each devoted to the development of an important subject, or department, and embodying the reflections and experience of many minds, and the working and results of many institutions; and the whole, when complete, to constitute an Encyclopedia of Education. The plan was referred to a committeeconsidered and approved; and the Standing Committee were authorized to carry it into execution as far and as fast as the funds of the Association should admit. In the absence of any funds belonging to the Association, and of any pledge of pecuniary coöperation, on the part of individuals, the Committee have not taken any steps to establish a central agency for the advancement of the objects for which the association was instituted, or felt authorized to provide for any publication beyond the proceedings of its last annual meeting. Under these circumstances, the undersigned has undertaken on his own responsibility, to carry out the original plan submitted by him, so far as relates to the publication both of the Journal, and the Libraryrelying on the annual subscription of individuals in different states, and interested in different allotments of the great field, who desire to be posted up in the current intelligence and discussion of schools and education, to meet the current expenses of the former; and on special contributions in aid of the latter, by persons or institutions interested in particular treatises, as their preparation shall be from time to time advanced and announced.

The First Number of the American Journal of Education will be issued in August, on terms which will be set forth by the publisher. As it will be devoted exclusively to the proceedings of the American Association for 1854, it will not present the usual variety and arrangement of topics, which will characterize the succeeding numbers.

The first treatise or volume of the Library of Education will be published in the course of 1856, under the following title, “NATIONAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES; or Contributions to the History and Improvement of Common or Public Schools, and other means of Popular Education in the several States," on terms which will be hereafter announced. HARTFORD, Conn., May, 1855.

HENRY BARNARD.

P. S. After much of the copy for this Number of the American Journal of Education was in type, a conference was held with the Rev. Absalom Peters, D.D., in reference to the plan of an Educational Journal contemplated by him under the title of The American College Review and Educational Journal, which has led to the combination of our respective plans, and a joint editorship of THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION AND COLLEGE REVIEW.

Note to New Edition.—The agreement for the joint proprietorship and editorship of the American Journal of Education and College Review, having been dissolved by mutual consent and for mutual convenience, the undersigned aas resumed the publication of the American Journal of Education on his originai plan. A portion of the material intended for the first voluine of the American Library of Education, will be published in the American Journal of Education.

Dr. Peters will continue the publication of an educational periodical to which he has given the joint name.

H. B. Hartford, January 7, 1856.

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