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SUPPLEMENT.

OFFICIAL CIRCULAR.-N0. 6.

CONTENTS.

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I. COLLEGES, Schools, AND DEPARTMENTS OF SCIENCE,
Applied to the Industrial Arts, aided by National Land-Grant,

Continued, -
CONSECTICUT.

Sheffield Scientific School of Yale College, New Haven, MASSACHUSETTS.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston,

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, New York.

Cornell University, Ithaca, PENNSYLVANIA.

State Agricultural College, Centre County, MICHIGAN.

State Agricultural College, Lansing, MARYLAND.

State Agricultural College, Ilyattsville, Prince George County, NEW HAMPSUTRE.

State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, Hanover, VERMONT.

State University and Agricultural College, Burlington, Iowa.

State Agricultural College and Model Farm, Story County, Wisconsin.

College of Arts-State University, Madison, WEST VIRGINIA.

State Agricultural College, Morgantown, NEW JERSEY.

State Agricultural and Mechanical Arts College, New Brunswick, KENTUCKY.

State Agricultural and Mechanical College, Lexington, CALIFORNIA.

State Agricultural, Mining and Mechanical Arts College, MAINE.

State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, Orono, RHODE ISLAND.

Brown University, Providence, Kansas.

State Agricultural College, Manhattan, Illinois.

State Industrial University, Urbana,

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SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL OF YALE COLLEGE.

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

HISTORY,

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In the year 1846, a “Department of Philosophy and Art " was instituted in Yale College, on the same general principles as the Departments of Law, Medicine and Theology. One design in this movement was to secure better opportunities of scientific instruction for chemists, agriculturists and other students who might or might not have been members of the Academical Department. A special “ Analytical Laboratory” was soon opened for the instruction of these scholars. Six years later a class in Engineering was com

mmenced. These classes soon became known as the “Yale Scientific School,” and were the beginning of the present organization. In 1860, a liberal endowment was received from Joseph E. Sheffield, Esq., of New Haven, (amounting to upwards of $100,000, and subsequently increased by further gifts of $60,000) in consequence of which the name of "Sheffield Scientific School ” was given to the establishment. The school, as enlarged and re-organized, was almost exactly such a college as was contemplated in the Act of Congress of July 2, 1862, so that the Legislature of Connecticut was led, almost unanimously, to bestow upon this department of Yale College the income of the fund derived from the sale of land scrip. The act directing this appropriation was approved June 24, 1863.

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TRUSTEES.

The Trustees of the institution are the Corporation of Yale College, consisting of the President of the College and ten Clerical Fellows, the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and six senior Senators of the State. The Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and three senior Senators, with the Secretary of the State Board of Education constitute the State Board of Visitors, and with the Secretary of the School, the Board for the appointment of State Students. The following persons compose the Board of Visitors in September 1867:- His Excellency James E. English, his Honor E H. Hyde, Hon. George Beach, Hon. M. T. Granger, Hon. A. J. Gallup, and Rev. B. G. Northrup. The Secretary of the School is Professor D. C. Gilman. The President of Yale College and the thirteen professors of this department form a “Governing Boerd,” responsible to the corporation.

SALE OF THE SCRIP.

The amount of the national land-grant conferred upon Connecticut was 180,000 acres. The scrip representing this endowment was sold by the Commissioner of the School Fund, in accordance with the directions of the Legislature, on terms approved by the Governor of the State, Hon. W. A. Buckingham. The price which it brought was 75 cts. per acre, yielding a capital of 135,010 dollars. This was first invested in United States Ten-Forty bonds, bearing interest in gold at the rate of 5 per ct. per annum; but subsequently the Legislalature directed that these securities should be sold and the proceeds invested, instead, in Connecticut State Bonds bearing interest at 6 per cent. in currency. The annual income from this fund is therefore $8,100.

OTHER FCNDS AND PROPERTY.

The school is the owner of a spacious and commodious edifice provided by Mr. Sheffield, at a cost, including outfit, &c., of about $100,000. It has invested funds, the gift of various parties, amounting to about $70,000,—and has also large collections of books, apparatus, instruments, and specimens in Natural History. Besides its own peculiar property, the school as a department of Yale College enjoys the advantages of the Public Library of the University, the Peabody Museum of Natural History, the Yale School of the Fine Arts, and other costly and serviceable endowments, which could not be replaced for half a million of dollars.

EXPERIMENTAL FARM.

No effort has been made to purchase a farm for experiment or practice. The funds of the institution are at present quite inadequate to this outlay; and the instructors believe that many if not all the advantages looked for in such an investment may be secured by observation and experiment on private farms in the neighborhood of New Haven, without expending any considerable sum in the purchase and management of a school farm, beyond a piece of ground suitable for a botanical garden and for occasional experiments, which would be a welcome accession to the school.

MANUAL LABOR.

There has been no proposal to require manual labor of the students, nor would the suggestion meet with favor. Some of the students of their own accord take part in mechanical pursuits or other industrial occupations,-and there are abundant opportunities for physical exercise in the scientific excursions which are kept up through the summer, and also in the college gymnasium, and in boating, skating, etc.

MILITARY INSTRUCTION.

Thus far military instruction has been given by an annual course of lectures from a Prussian military officer, who was a Brigadier General in the recent war for the Union. He has expounded the principles of strategy and tactics, with diagrams and other means of illustration, in an interesting and profitable man

The provisions for military instruction proposed by Congress in the act of July 26, 1836, are now under consideration by the authorities of Yale College, and their action may modify these existing arrangements.

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PUBLIC LECTURES.

Courses of public lectures have been given the last two years to mechanics in Sheffield Hall, and to farmers assembled in different parts of the State.

TCITION AND FREE SCHOLARSHIPS, The charge for tuition is $125 per year, payable $15 at the beginning of the first and second term, and $35 at the beginning of the third term. The special student in Chemistry is charged an addition of $75 per annum for chemicals and the use of apparatus, and must supply himself with certain articles at a cost of five or ten dollars per term.

Forty free scholarships, open only to citizens of Connecticut, have been established by the State, and more than half of them are already occupied. If more applicants should appear than there are vacancies, the preference is to be given to those who have become orphans because their fathers served in the army or navy of the C. S., and next, to those who need pecuniary assistance ; it being understood that all applicants must be fitting themselves for industrial occupations. The appointments are moreover to be distributed among the several counties in proportion to their population.

LODGING AND BOARD.

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The school owns but one building, (known as “Sheffield Hall,” the gift of Mr. Joseph E. Sheffield,) which is devoted to the necessary rooms for instruction, laboratories, museums, library, &c.

The students lodge and board in private houses. Some public provision to lessen the cost of living; for example a good dormitory, and a public boarding house conducted by the students with the co-operation of the faculty, are both most desirable.

ADMISSION.

All who enter the Sheffield School must be at least sixteen years of age, and must have mastered Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry,-besides what are called “the higher English branches.” The entrance examinations on these studies are strict, as they are not pursued in the school, and are essential to successful progress. The regular examination is at the close of the third term and tbe beginning of the first term, (eight weeks after commencement.)

REGULAR COURSES OF STUDY.

The regular courses of study occupy three years, each year having three terms, two of fourteen and one of twelve weeks. During the first or Freshman year, the entire class is taught in the same studies, which are partly mathematical, partly scientific, and partly linguistic,—the object being to lay such a foundation of scholastic discipline as will be useful in any special department of study. During the second and third years, the students group themselves in seven sections, the professional character of which is clearly in. dicated by the titles, viz:

1. CHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGY. 2. CIVIL ENGINEERING. 3. MECHANICS. 4. MINING AND METALLURGY. 5. AGRICULTURE. 6. NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY. 7. SELECT COURSE OF SCIENTIFIC AND LITERARY STUDIES.

In all these sections attention is paid to the French and German languages. Examinations are held at the close of every term; and once a year there is an examination in writing on the studies of the year. These courses lead to the Degree of “ Bachelor of Philosophy," conferred by Yale College. The Degree of “Civil Engineer” is conferred on students who pursue an advanced course of

gineering, and that of “ Doctor of Philosophy" on those who study for two years after having attained to a Bachelor's Degree in Arts, Philosophy and Science, and who pass a successful examination in higher departments of science,

PARTIAL COURSES.

Students qualified to pursue advanced courses of instruction in Chemistry, Practical Astronomy, Zoology, and other branches taught in the institution are admitted to partial and selected courses adapted to their special wants. One object of this arrangement is to aid young men to qualify themselves to become Professors, Teachers and independent investigators in various departments of natural science. There is also a "shorter course” in agriculture, definitely arranged and announced.

INSTRUCTORS.

The President of the institution is Rev. THEODORE D. WOOLSEY, D. D., LL.D.
The Chairman of the Governing Board is Professor James D. Dana; and
the Professors and their departments are as follows:
William A. Norton,

Civil Engineering and Mathematics.
James D. Dana,

Geology and Mineralogy.
BENJAMIN SILLIMAN,

General Chemistry.
CHESTER S. LYMAN,

Industrial Mechanics and Physics.
William D. WHITNEY,

Modern Languages.
GEORGE J. Brush,

Mineralogy and Metallurgy.
DANIEL C. GILMAN,

Physical Geography.
SAMUEL W. JOHNSON,

Analytical and Agricultural Chemistry.
William H. BREWER,

Agriculture.
ALFRED P. ROCKWELL,

Mining.
DANIEL C. Eaton,

Botany.
OTHNIEL C. Marse,

alæontology.
Addison E. VERRILL,

Zoology.
The additional instructors in 1866-7, were:
MARK BAILEY,

Elocution.
Louis Bail,

Drawing and Designing.
A. Von STEINWEHR,

Military Science.
John AVERY,

Physics, etc.,
James B. STONE,

Mathematics.
BEVERLY S. BURTON,

Chemistry.
CHARLES J. SHEFFIELD,

Assaying.
Some of the students are also required to attend lectures in the other depart.

the University,-especially the lectures on Physics and Astronomy by Professor E. Loomis, on Human Anatomy and Physiology by Dr. L. J. Sanford, and on Mental and Moral Philosophy by Rev. Professor N. Porter.

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