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INDEX OF FIRST LINES

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Absence, hear thou my protestation.
A Chieftain to the Highlands bound
A flock of sheep that leisurely pass by.
Ah, Chloris I could I now but sit
Ah ! County Guy, the hour is nigh
All in the Downs the fleet was moor'd
All thoughts, all passions, all delights
And are ye sure the news is true .
And is this — Yarrow? — This the Stream
And thou art dead, as young and fair
And wilt thou leave me thus
Ariel to Miranda :- Take
Art thou pale for weariness.
Art thou poor, yet hast thou golden slumbers
As it fell upon a day . .
As I was walking all alane
A slumber did my spirit seal
As slow our ship her foamy track
A sweet disorder in the dress .
At the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears
At the mid hour of night, when stars are weeping, I ily.
Avenge, O Lord ! thy slaughter'd Saints, whose bones
Awake, Aeolian lyre, awake
Awake, awake, my Lyre
A weary lot is thine, fair maid
A wet sheet and a flowing sea
A widow bird sate mourning for her Love

26
106

215
262

92
305
237

60
156

99
231
242
327

201

Bards of Passion and of Mirth
Beauty sat bathing by a spring

14

304

8

Behold her, single in the field.
Being your slave, what should I do but tend
Beneath these fruit-tree boughs that shed.
Best and Brightest, come away
Bid me to live, and I will live.
Blest pair of Sirens, pledges of Heaven's joy
Blow, blow, thou winter wind.
Bright Star! would I were steadfast as thou art

293
320

94
122

32

235

35

38

Call for the robin-redbreast and the wren .
Calm was the day, and through the trembling air
Captain, or Colonel, or Knight in arms
Care-charmer Sleep, son of the sable Night .
Come away, come away, Death
Come live with me and be

my

Love
Crabbed Age and Youth
Cupid and my Campaspe play'd .
Cyriack, whose grandsire, on the royal bench

74
27
33

.

4
6

37
79

190

87
300
12

Daughter of Jove, relentless power.
Daughter to that good earl, once President
Degenerate Douglas ! O the unworthy lord
Diaphenia like the daffadowndilly
Doth then the world go thus, doth all thus move
Down in yon garden sweet and gay
Drink to me only with thine eyes
Duncan Gray cam here to woo

47
144

91
181

Earl March look'd on his dying child
Earth has not anything to show more fair
Eternal Spirit of the chainless Mind
Ethereal Minstrel ! pilgrim of the sky
Ever let the Fancy roam

234
299
248
289
331

108

Fair Daffodils, we weep to see
Fair pledges of a fruitful tree.
Farewell ! thou art too dear for my possessing
Fear no more the heat o' the sun.
For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove
Forget not yet the tried intent
Four Seasons fill the measure of the year
From Harmony, from heavenly Harmony

107
23
33
154

17
365

58

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289
131
77
89
279
1οΙ

III

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit
Happy the man, whose wish and care
Happy those early days, when I.

He that loves a rosy cheek.
He is gone on the mountain
Hence, all you vain delights
Hence, loathed Melancholy
Hence, vain deluding Joys
How delicious is the winning .
How happy is he born and taught
How like a winter hath my absence been.
How sleep the Brave who sink to rest .
How sweet the answer Echo makes
How vainly men themselves amaze .

116

219
75

9
141

221

109

192
209
329
169
152
212

35

I am monarch of all I survey.
I arise from dreams of Thee
I dream'd that as I wander'd by the way.
If aught of oaten stop or pastoral song
If doughty deeds my lady please
I fear thy kisses, gentle maiden
If Thou survive my well-contented day
If to be absent were to be
If women could be fair, and yet not fond.
I have had playmates, I have had companions
I heard a thousand blended notes
I met a traveller from an antique land
I'm wearing awa', Jean.
In a drear-nighted December .
In the downhill of life, when I find I'm declining.
In the sweet shire of Cardigan
I remember, I remember
I saw where in the shroud did lurk
It is a beauteous evening, calm and free

97
31
261

335
299
186

227
198
258
266
283
325

It is not Beauty I demand
It is not growing like a tree
I travell’d among unknown men
It was a lover and his lass
It was a summer evening
I've heard them lilting at our ewe-milking
I wander'd lonely as a cloud
I was thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile
I wish I were where Helen lies

88
76
213

7
254
142
309
353
105

John Anderson my jo, John

185

78

18

Lawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Life! I know not what thou art .
Life of Life ! Thy lips enkindle
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore
Like to the clear in highest sphere
Love not me for comely grace
Lo! where the rosy-bosom'd Hours

199
334
23
12

95
164

345
194
251
169

71
331

200

Many a green isle needs must be
Mary! I want a lyre with other strings
Milton ! thou shouldst be living at this hour
Mine be a cot beside the hill
Mortality, behold and fear .
Most sweet it is with unuplifted eyes
Much have I travellid in the realms of gold .
Music, when soft voices die
My days among the Dead are past
My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains.
My heart leaps up when I behold
My Love in her attire doth shew her wit
My lute, be as thou wert when thou didst

grow
My thoughts hold mortal strife
My true love hath my heart, and I have his .

373
271
296
366
93
28

32
19

No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note
Not, Celia, that I juster am
Now the golden Morn alost
Now the last day of many days

36
257

96
129
322

Page No.

of the land, and hence with the winds which affect

them.
353 CCLXXVI Written soon after the death, by shipwreck, of

Wordsworth's brother John. This Poem should be
compared with Shelley's following it. Each is the
most complete expression of the innermost spirit of his
art given by these great Poets :-of that Idea which,
as in the case of the true Painter, (to quote the words
of Reynolds,) 'subsists only in the mind : The sight
never beheld it, nor has the hand expressed it; it is an
idea residing in the breast of the artist, which he is
always labouring to impart, and which he dies at last

without imparting.'
355

the Kind: the human race.
356 ccLxxvIII Proteus represented the everlasting changes, unit-

ed with ever-recurrent sameness, of the Sea.
357 CCLXXIX the royal Saint: Henry VI.

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