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THE MEMBERS OF THE SOVIET HELSINKI MONITORING GROUPS

In May of 1976, a group of Soviet citizens dedicated themselves to promoting compliance by their government with the humanitarian provisions of the Helsinki Final Act. Collecting and disseminating information on violations of those provisions, these human rights activists thereby expressed their stated conviction that "the issues of humanitarianism and free information have a direct relationship to the problem of international security." Respect for human rights in the USSR, they held, is a precondition for the development of a solid East-West detente.

After hearing about the work of the Helsinki Groups on foreign radio broadcasts, many ordinary Soviet citizens began sending to the Group information on human rights violations in various areas of the USSR. In this way, the Groups became catalysts, drawing together the disparate strands of Soviet dissent. Group reports reflect these varied concerns: conditions in labor camps and psychiatric hospitals; the problems of religious and ethnic minorities; emigration difficulties; and denials of economic rights. The CSCE Commission translates and compiles these Group documents in its series of Reports of the Helsinki Accord Monitors in the Soviet Union.

Encouraged by the success of the first Helsinki Group in Moscow, other such groups were organized in the Ukraine, Lithuania, Armenia and Georgia. In Moscow, two allied groups were formed to deal with more specific issues: the Working Commission on the Use of Psychiatry for Political Purposes, and the Christian Committee to Defend the Rights of Believers. In recognition of the sacrifice, dedication, and successful work of all these groups, the Commission on. Security and Cooperation in Europe nominated all their members for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1978 and 1979.

During the past two years, other allied groups have emerged: the Initiative Group for the Defense of the Rights of Invalids in the USSR; the Group for the Legal Struggle and Investigation of Facts About the Persecution of Believers in the USSR of the All-Union Church of the Faithful and Free Seventh-Day Adventists; and the Catholic Committee to Defend the Rights of Believers in the USSR. With the addition of these new committees, an even broader spectrum of human rights issues and interests in the Soviet Union is now represented.

At the present time, there are 66 men and women in the Helsinki Monitoring Groups in Moscow, Ukraine, Lithuania, Georgia and Armenia. Currently, 26 people have joined the Christian, Catholic and Adventist Corrmi t tees, the Working Commission on Psychiatric Abuse and the Initiative Group for Invalids.

For this compilation of biographical information on the present members, the Commission is indebted to the following for their assistance:

ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS

Amnesty International, Bulletin d'Information,
Comite pour 1'application des accords
d'Helsinki en Georgie, Committee for the
Defense of Soviet Political Prisoners, ELTA
Information Service, Helsinki Guarantees for
Ukraine Committee, Keston College, Khronika
Press, Lithuanian-American Community of the
U.S.A., Inc., Lithuanian Catholic Religious
Aid, National Conference on Soviet Jewry, Radio
Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Smoloskyp, Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry, the Ukrainian
National Information Service, the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews, Washington Street
Research Cente r.

INDIVIDUALS

Mr. Victor Abdalov, Mrs. Lyudmila Alekseeva,
Gen. and Mrs. Pyotr Grigorenko, Ms. Dina
Kaminskaya, Mr. Ambartsum Khlagatyan, Mr.
Michael Meerson, Rev. Aleksandr Shmeiman, Mr
Konstantin Simis, Ms. Veronika Stein, Mr.
Valentin Turchin, and Ms. Lydia Voronina, Ms
Yulya Zaks.

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