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Don Scipio. Oh, dear me!
Spado. But I got them out.
Don Scipio. How ? how?

Spado. I told them they should come and murder you this evening

, Don Scipio. Much obliged to you.-Oh, lord !

[Ā crash and tumultuous noise without ; BAN

DITTI rush in armed; Don CÆSAR at their head. FERNANDO draws, and stands be

fore VICTORIA. Band. This way!

Don Scipio. Oh, ruin! I'm a miserable old man ! Where's now my son, Don Cæsar?- If I hadn't bavished him, I should now have a protector in my child.

Don Cæsar. Then you shall. -Hold! (T. BANDITTI.] My father!

[Kneels to Don Scipio. Don Scipio. How ! My son, Don Cæsar!

Don Cæsar. Yes, sir; drove to desperation by my follies were my own-but

my

vices Don Scipio. Were the consequence of my rigour, -My child! let these tears wash away

the remembrance.

Don Cæsar. My father! I am unworthy of this goodness.- I confess even now I entered this castle with an impious determination to extort by force

Sang. Captain, we didn't come here to talk.
Give the word for plunder.
Bund. Ay, plunder!

[Very tumultuous. Don Cæsar. Hold ! Spado. Ay, captain, let's have a choice rummaging.

[Cocks his Pistol. Ped. Oh, Lord ! there's the barrel-organ! Don Cæsar. Stop! hold! I command you.

Don Scipio. Oh, heavens! then is Ramirez the terrible captain of the cut-throats--the grand tiger of

Don Scipio. I'll have you hanged, you villain!

Spado. Hanged ! dear sir, 'twould be the death of me.

Pedrillo. (Without.] Come along, my cara sposa tol-de-rol

Enter PedriLLO. How do you do, boys and girls-Zounds! my old master!

Don Juan. Pedrillo! hey-day! here's finery!

Ped. I must brazen it out.--Ah, Don Juan, my worthy dad !

Don Juan. Why, what in the name of_but I'll beat you to a mummy, sirrah?

Ped. Don't do that-I'm going to be married to an heiress, so mustn't be beat to a mummy. Stand before me, spouse.

[Gets behind LORENZA.
Don Juan. Let me come at him.
Spado. Stay where you are, he don't want you.
Don Fer. Dear sir !

Don Scipio. Patience, Don Juan; your son has got my daughter-so our contract's fulfilled.

Don Juan. Yes, sir; but who's to satisfy me for your intended affront, hey?

Don Scipio. How shall I get out of this-I'll revenge all upon you, you little rascal! to prison you go.Here, a brace of alguazils, and a pair of handcuffs.

Spado. For me! the best friend you have in the world!

Don Scipio. Friend, you villain! that sha'n't save your neck.

Spado. Why, I've saved your throat.
Don Scipio. How, sirrah?

Spado. Only two of the banditti here in the castle, this morning.

Don Scipio. Oh, dear me!
Spado. But I got them out.
Don Scipio. How? how?

Spado. I told them they should come and murder you this evening. Don Scipio. Much obliged to you. Oh, lord !

[Ā crash and tumultuous noise without ; Ban

Ditti rush in armed; Don CÆSAR at their head. Fernando draws, and stands be

fore Victoria. Band. This way!

Don Scipio. Oh, ruin! I'm a miserable old man ! Where's now my son, Don Cæsar?-If I hadn't banished him, I should now have a protector in my child.

Don Cæsar. Then you shall. Hold! (To BANDITTI.] My father!

[Kneels to Don Scipio. Don Scipio. How! My son, Don Cæsar!

Don Cæsar. Yes, sir; drove to desperation by my follies were my own but my vices

Don Scipio. Were the consequence of my rigour, -My child! let these tears wash away the remembrance.

Don Cæsar. My father! I am unworthy of this goodness. I confess even now I entered this castle with an impious determination to extort by force

Sang. Captain, we didn't come here to talk.
Give the word for plunder.

bund. Ay, plunder! [Very tumultuous.
Don Cæsar. Hold !
Spado. Ay, captain, let's have a choice rummaging.

[Cocks his Pistol.
Ped. Oh, Lord! there's the barrel-organ!
Don Cæsar. Stop! hold! I command you. :

Don Scipio. Oh, heavens! then is Ramirez the terrible captain of the cut-throats--the grand tiger of

the cave?-But all my fault ! the unnatural parent should be punished in a rebellious child. My life is yours.

Don Cesar. And I'll preserve it as my own.-Re. tire, and wait your orders.

(Exeunt all BANDITTI but SPADO. Don Scipio. What then, you won't let me be mur. dered. My dear boy ! my darling! Forgive me! - pardon all,

Don Cæsar. Then, sir, I shall first beg it for my companions, if, reclaimed by the example of their leader, their future lives show them worthy of mer. cy; if not, with mine let them be forfeit to the hand of justice.

Don Scipio. Some, I believe, may go up-Eh ! little Spado, could you dance upon nothing ?

Spado. Yes, sir : but our captain, your son, must lead up the ball.

(Bows lor. · Don Scipio. Ha ! ha! ha! Well, you know, though ill bestowed, I must try my interest at Madrid. Children, I ask your pardon; forgive me, Victoria, and take my blessing in return.

Vict. And do you, sir, acknowledge me for your. child? ,

Don Scipio. I do, I do: and my future kindness shall make amends for my past cruelty.

Ped. Ha, here comes my sposa.- Éh! got a beau already?

Enter ALPHONso and LORENZA. · Don Cæsar. My beloved Lorenza! 7 Lor. My dearest !

Embrace. Don Alph, My good captain! as I knew this lady only by the name of Victoria, you little imagined, in your friendly promises to me, you were giving away your Lorenza; but, had I then known we both loved

the same mistress, I should, ere now, have relinquished my pretensions.

Lor. My good-natured Alphonso! Accept my gra. titude, my esteem; but my love is, and ever was, in the possession of

Don Cæsar. Dear father, this is the individual lady whose beauty, grace, and angelic voice, captivated my soul at Florence; if she can abase her spotless mind, to think upon a wretch stained with crimes, accompany her pardon with your approba.

tion.

Don Scipio. Isabel has been too good, and I too bad a parent ! Ha! ha! ha! then fate has decreed you are to be my daughter, some way or other

Ped. Yes: but has fate decreed that my sposa is to be another man's wife?

Spado. And, sir, [To Scipio.] if fate has decreed that your son is not to be hanged, let the indulgence extend to the humblest of his followers.

[Bows low. Don Scipio. Ha! ha! ha! Well, though I believe you a great, little rogue, yet it seems you have been the instrument of bringing about things just as they should be.

Don Juan. They are not as they should be, and I tell you again, Don Scipio, I will have

Don Scipio, Well, and shall have a bottle of the best wine in Andalusia, sparkling Muscadel, bright as Victoria's eye, and sweet as Lorenza's lip : hey, now for our brace of weddings--where are the violins, lutes, and cymbals ? I say, let us be merry in future, and past faults our good-humoured friends will forget and forgive.

GLEE.--FINALE
Social powers at pleasure's call
Welcome here to Hymen's hall;

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