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Autobiography is nearly always interesting, and that of a great man most valuable and significant. We have just one set of Ben Franklin's Autobiography, bound in fine cloth, ten volumes,

from Houghton, Mifflin & Co., (a guarantee of good printing). The work sells regularly at $30.00 ; our price is $26.00, only slightly above cost. An opportunity for some library, private or public.

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OFFICE AND PARLOR, SUITABLE FOR A

physician, in desirable locality in West Phila. delphia. Address No. 13, this office.

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These trade-mark crisseross liges on every package

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DYSPEPTICS
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FARWELL & RHINES WATERTOWN, N. Y., V. S. A.

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Watches, Diamonds, etc.

FRIENDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION

15th and Race Streets, Philadelphia WALTER H. JENKINS,

Manager,

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Notes and Announcements

. 30

Swarthmore College Notes

. 32

Friends' Associations,

. 32

FRIENDS INTELLIGENCER

Established 1844.
The Journal 1873.
Young Friends' Review 1886.

PHILADELPHIA, FIRST MONTH 11, 1908.

Volume LXV.
Number 2.

56

In view of the awakening in our Society, I think that being charitable and philanthropic is no the beginning of new activities will not be to go out

mere matter of sentiment, but that it is preto hunt new fields of action, but to face the work in eminently a matter of sentiment guided by intelliour own borders, and fulfil the duties we are

gent thought and willingness to serve is empha

sized in this new book. The writer does not agree already familiar with.

A FRIEND.

with Professor Patten of the University of Penn

sylvania when, in his book on "The New Basis of THE SAILING OF THE FLEET.

Civilization,” he seems to belittle what he calls Thou hast gone forth with war upon thy prow,

'service altruism,” the sympathetic, personal O Fleet, when men had hoped that wars should cease, assistance of those who, like the man helped by To give the menacing, mailed hand of peace

the Samaritan, have been wounded and have fallen In fellowship to nations we would cow.

by the wayside. Professor Patten would make of Grim Fleet of strength! while thy proud keels may plough Unfriendly seas, may no base hand release

greater importance, in fact the key note of modern The bolt of war, nor cowards in mad.caprice

charity, “Income altruism”-money power, which, Blast thee with death to keep a hellish vow.

he says, hews to the base of evils confronting Freighted with death, oh keep thy throated guns

present-day society. In her introduction Miss Silent in peace! and turn thy threat of strife

Richmond says, “Income altruism is indeed need. To amity of peoples hating thee;

ed, but without a strong infusion of the service And teach the fiercer blood of torrid suns,

altruism it never kept anything policed and Restless with envy and with treasons rife, The precepts of thy land of liberty.

lighted, 'never hewed to the base' since the world Swarthmore College. WILBUR MORRIS STINE. began, and never will.” Continuing, she says,

"Another common mistake made by those who

write upon social questions in these days is to THE GOOD NEIGHBOR.

assume that 'cure' and 'prevention' are opposed Taking for her theme, the parable of the Good to one another, and that prevention cannot get its Samaritan, Miss Mary E. Richmond, general sec- just due until we spend less time in curing the ills retary of the Philadelphia Society for Organizing of individuals. Never was there a more mischieCharity, has recently written a little book that for vous social fallacy! Prevention and cure must go genuine usefulness and practicability is probably hand in hand. In winning for the present genone of the best pieces of literature to be had by eration of consumptives, for instance, the kindest either the volunteer or professional worker in the and most adequate care, we are cutting out many field of charity and philanthropy. Miss Richmond centers of contagion and at the same time educahas chosen for the title of her new book, "The ting the public as to the true means of prevention. Good Neighbor." In reading through the 150 odd "The means of cure and prevention are not far pages of the little volume one comes to the con- from each one of us, nor does their use demand clusion that being a good neighbor means far great expenditure of time and effort. Each one more than nine out of ten of us seem to realize; it by taking a little thought can do more than might involves duties and responsibilities of which it is at first appear without becoming either a trained a very easy matter for us who spend our days in a expert or an income altruist, and his service will great city to be oblivious. It is plain that every weigh double when it is done, not in the patronizday of our lives we may, if we will, act the part ing spirit of the benefactor, but in the democratic of the Good Samaritan. But Miss Richmond spirit of the good neighbor. " Expressing the recognizes the fact that very many of us have the conviction that there must be a wider recognition desire to be neighborly in the best sense without among charitable people of the need for a modifihaving the necessary knowledge to enable us to cation of methods to meet present day conditions accomplish our desire. She has in a simple and if there is to be any great social advance, Miss decidedly pleasant manner given a wealth of Richmond states her purpose in writing her book information and suggestion for our help, all of to be "a description of the various ways in which which has come from her own experience in striv- modern Samaritans may use the inns and inning to extend the helping hand just as often and keepers of today in assisting those who have as effectively as possible. The modern thought I fallen among thieves."

18

FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER.

[First month 11, 1908

No attempt is made to interpret neighborliñess which characteristic thë neighboring towns hold in all of its aspects, but consideration is given to it in some scorn-we can scarcely step outside the bad conditions and remedial agencies that sur- our door without seeing something interesting or round some of our poorer neighbors, including the amusing, and we never go to The Hague without city children at play, at school, at work, at home discovering some new characteristic or custom. and in the streets; men and women who make the Only the other day as I was paying a bill, I was goods we buy; tenants who live in the houses we surprised when, in addition to my change, the build and rent; men without homes who stop us clerk handed me eight cents. “For the servant?' on the street; families that have been worsted in he explained, noticing my surprise, and I found life's struggle by accident or death; and the sick it is the custom for dealers to allow something for who should have been strong and well. Perhaps the servant when she pays a bill. When the misthe most helpful feature of the book is, that in tress pays it herself, the fee is given just the each chapter there are definite suggestions given same, but whether it then ever reaches the serfor dealing with problems of one kind and another vant, I cannot say. that come up for solution to the individual good The maid regularly receives a percentage from neighbor, at his home, his office, the meeting the butcher, the baker, the grocer, etc., when and elsewhere. The book ought to be read by their bills are over three or four dollars, and it is every one connected with such organizations as

also the custom for dinner guests as well as those the King's Daughters, the Neighborhood Guild staying longer in the house to give the maids genand philanthropic committees. It will give erous fees, so while their wages are low--two dollittle encouragement to that dilettante class that lars a week being considered excellent pay-they loves to be entertained with sweet sounding lec- have more sources of income than have our maids tures and talks upon love and charity in the

charity in the in America. The servant problem is said to be abstract

, but it ought to be helpful to all who very serious in Holland, as elsewhere, but there really desire to serve men, be it in ever so small a is undoubtedly a much stronger sense of obligadegree.

tion to keep contracts and a more respectful bearThe book has been published by J. B. Lippin- ing—if a somewhat freer manner-than with us. cott & Co., and may be had from the Friends' | After our own experience here we are inclined to Book Association for 60 cents.

believe that Dutch housekeepers do not know ARTHUR M. DEWEES. what a real Servant Problem is. Chairman of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting's

We are constantly impressed with the great Philanthropic Committee.

number of inconveniences which everyone seems to accept as inevitable-doors which never latch

unless the knobs are turned, and knobs which are FROM A FRIEND IN HOLLAND-III. a constant reminder that patience is a virtue-and After reading Through the Gates of the with the useless labor unquestioningly performed Netherlands " I felt as though it was scarcely for custom's sake. In our kitchen, for instance, worth while for me to write you any more letters, hang beautiful brass and copper pans--for ornafor Miss Waller seems to have told about every ment solely-as are also the lorg brass handles of place we have visited and even many of our per- a curious Dutch pump now: defunct. Our maid sonal experiences. I really only need to refer you

I really only need to refer you never has to be told to keep these bright; it is her to the proper pages and there you will find all I pride and pleasure to do so, even if some things should write. As we read the book sitting round more important but less obvious are neglected. our own cozy fireside in Villa Bosch Hoek, not ten Scrubbing and polishing seem to be the chief minutes walk from her Villa Antoine, we passed pleasures of these Dutch working women, and when in review the pleasures and trials of our first the day of our weekly upheaval arrives we feel weeks of housekeeping, and heard once more the like fleeing to The Hague, only we know we should sweet bells of Middelburg and wandered again find no relief there, for the same thing is going on through the streets of “dear old Dort."

not only inside the houses but outside, and the But perhaps the last word has not yet been pedestrian must be prepared to pick his way said, for though Holland has changed in many amongst the vehicles in the street or ford the nuways since de Amici's time, it is still its own merous streams of water that flow across the sideunique self, full of interesting sights and customs walk. that cannot all be observed by one person in one In spite of this continual cleaning I have not year, nor by many persons in many years. In yet seen a real broom in Holland. The only apspite of the fact that we are living on the edge of proach to one is the awkward implement used by the most cosmopolitan city of the country--for the street cleaners a great bunch of heather

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