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WORKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED.

essay to the notice of our readers. The words, “ Farewell Lecture," have struck a tender chord in our bosoms, as we have ruminated upon the loss which the public will sustain from the retirement of such a man as Dr. Gregory, from a sphere of high influence, which he has adorned for more than a quarter of a century. It would be difficult to say to what extent the labours of such a gifted and upright person have been blessed, in such a scene of labour as the Royal Military College at Woolwich. In not a few instances we are happy to know that the influence exerted has been of the highest and most beneficial order. But the brightest earthly career must sooner or later reach a close. Dr. Gregory's health has been such of late years as to render truly desirable the quietude and retirement of private life; aud at last he has summoned resolution, a resolution in which all his friends must rejoice, to resign his responsible trust into other hands. May he be yet long spared as a distinguished blessing to his amiable family and private circle !

The essay before us partakes of a highly stimulating character. It is a kind of re. capitulation of those practical maxims, which. for several years, he has inculcated upon his students in the military college, in the prosecution of their professional studies. Clear and inductive in its scientific character, it is equally clear and impressive in its moral tone. We recommend it earnestly to the attention of students in general. It will be a fine monument to the taste and talent of the author, in retiring from the mathemati. cal chair of a military college.

The Parent's Guide to a Liberal and

Comprehensive EDUCATION. By the Rev. ROBERT SIMPSON, M.A., Master of Colebrook House Academy, Islington.

This is no ordinary book. The youth who is carried through the course here marked out, may be well said to have had a liberal and comprehensive education. Due honour is given to the book of God, by commencing with a set of questions on the first chapter of Genesis, that must set the young a-thinking. In the same way, the youth is led through the ele. ments of grammar, geography, astronomy, natural history, sacred and pro. fane history, arithmetic, algebra, mathe. matics, natural philosophy, chemistry, physiology, logic, and the fine arts. It may be expected, that, in such a range, the information is not always equally accurate; but the information is various, and we had almost said, vast. There is an appendix, exhibiting a severe parsing of the Latin and Greek classics. Happy the child who is thus taught !

1. History of the Great Reformation of the Sirteenth Century, in Germany, Switzerland, &c. By J. H. MERLE D'AUBIGNE, President of the Theological Society of Geneva, and Member of the So. ciété Evangélique. 8vo, pp. 494. D. Walther, 42, Piccadilly.

2. The Value of Divine Grace. Exemplified in a brief Narrative and Discourse. By the Rev. E. HULL. 12mo, pp. 84. Jackson and Walford. This is the first publication of the esteemed author, but we can assure our readers that it betrays none of the ordinary defects of a first literary production. It is a most pious, edifying, and striking narrative, greatly fitted to be useful.

3. The Historical and Geological Deluges compared. Part II. By EDWARD HITCHCOCK; Professor of Chemistry and Natural History in Amherst College. 12mo. Clark, Edinburgh. - We earnestly recommend this able treatise and its predecessor to all students in theology and inquiring persons generally. It contains a mass of welldigested information on the interesting topic to which it refers.

4. The Doctrine of the Person and Work of Christ. In a course of Popular Lectures, By ERNEST SARTORIUS, Professor of Theology in the University of Dorpat. Translated from the German. 12mo, pp. 138. Tract Society. It is truly delightful and refreshing to read such a volume of Lectures as this, on the person and work of Messiah, from the pen of a German.

5. Sacred Lyrics for Youth. With Pictorial Illustrations. Composed and selected to promote early piety, and to cherish domestic harmony and devotion. By GEORGE Pocock, 12mo, pp. 138. Sherwood and Co. This is a truly beautiful and attractive volume, pervaded by strict evangelical senti. ment, and peculiarly adapted to the improvement of the infant mind. A more suitable nursery volume cannot well be imagined.

6. Scripture Proverbs for the Young. By INGRAM COBBIN, A.M., author of " The Child's Commentator," “Scripture Illustrations for the Young,” " Scripture Similitudes,” &c. 18mo. William Ball, Aldine Chambers. This promises to be one of Mr. Cobbin's happiest and most useful conceptions. It consists of short striking comments on fifty-five texts, selected from the book of Proverbs, immediately adapted to the condition of the Young: with a beautiful wood engraving, illustrative of each separate subject.

7. The Sacramental Meditations and Spiritual Experience of the Rev. Philip Doddridge, D.D. Forming a practical sequel to his celebrated work, “Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul." Second and corrected edition. 18mo. W. Edwards. Ave Maria-lane.

8. Conversion of Dr. Capadose, of Amsterdam, a Portuguese Israelite. Written by himself. Published by the Neufchatel Society of the Friends of Israel. Translated from the French. 18mo. Nisbet. This is a most curious and highly instructive narrative.

9. A Word to Parents, Nurses, and Teachers, on the rearing and management of Children. More particularly adapted to the working classes. By ESTIER COPLEY, author of “Cottage Comforts," &c. 18mo. Simpkin and Marshall. Like several of our fair author's other works, this is a most valuable companion for the fire-side of the labouring classes. It abounds with excellent suggestions on all the subjects on which it touches.

10. Colonization and Christianity. A Popular History of the Treatment of the Natives, by the Europeans in all their Colonies. By WILLIAM HOWITT. 8vo, pp. 508. Longman and Co. A work much needed, and very ably written.

388

OBITUARY.

REV. HENRY LACEY. Died, on the 5th of June, whilst on a visit to his friends in Shropshire, at the house of his brother-in-law, W. Sing, Esq., Swancote, near Bridgnorth, the Rev. Henry Lacey, aged 57. He had been in the mi. nistry nearly forty years; was co-pastor with the Rev. W. Kingsbury, at Southamp. ton, and subsequently morning preacher at Salter's-hall Chapel, in the City of London, for seventeen years, during the pastorship, successively, of Mr. Hugh Worthington and Dr. Collyer. His illness was of short duration, arising from enlargement of the heart. He died in peace, saying, “ Into thine hand I commitmy spirit: thou hast redeemed me, O Lord God of truth." A funeral sermon was preached from those words on Sabbath evening, the 17th, at Bridgnorth, by the Rev. M. Barber.

EDMUND ROBERTS, ESQ.,

Late of Holyhead. The subject of the following brief notice was known to many a reader of this Magazine, and his name will occur to the grate ful recollections of not a few Christian ministers, who found a welcome under his hospitable roof at this place of embarkation. This circumstance, added to the general excellence of his character, renders him eminently worthy this humble tribute of affection, which should have been of earlier date. He was born November 19, 1781, at Trefrew, in the Isle of Anglesea. His childhood and youth were signalized by no remarkable occurrence, and the concerns of eternity seem to have been widely distant from his thoughts. When a boy at school, he was, indeed, tempted to regard himself as not " ordained to eternal life," and in consequence would literally stop his ears against the joyful sound while sitting under the ministry of reconciliation. His first serious impressions may be traced to a most providential escape from a watery grave on Christmas-day, in the year 1806. He was returning from Liverpool, and so tempestuous was the weather, that while crossing Conway river, the boat upset, and all the passengers, with the exception of a ferryman and himself, perished. When on the point of sinking, he grasped an oar and the mail-bag, and supported by them, reached the shore. This remarkable interposition of mercy was not lost upon him. He rendered unto the Lord the sacrifice of thanksgiving, committed the keeping of his soul to the Saviour, and dedicated the life

so mercifully redeemed from destruction, to the service of his mighty Deliverer. The serious impressions thus happily produced, were rendered still deeper by another event somewhat similar, which happened soon after. He intended going by sea to Liverpool, and had even sent his luggage on board, but was diverted from his purpose by the timely receipt of a letter. In a day or two intelligence arrived of the vessel having been lost, and all its company drowned. Herein was again recognized the same Almighty hand that had been so recently extended to his rescue, and another Ebenezer was raised. The year following his valuable life was again wonderfully preserved. As he returned from the country on horseback during a tremendous fall of snow, his companion on the road was frozen to death, and he himself had only just strength enough to reach his own door, being so benumbed with cold as not to be able to alight without assistance. Crowned with so many loving-kindnesses and tender mercies, he determined to cleave to the Lord and his people with full purpose of heart, which he was enabled by Divine grace to do, in connexion with the Cal. vinistic Methodists, of whose church he continued a faithful member until called to join the triumphant one above. In his domestic relations Mr. R. was highly favoured of the Lord, having been twice mar. ried, and blessed with a numerous offspring, some of whom had departed to be with Christ before him; others continue unto this day, affording evidences of their being in Christ. God forbid that any of their number be found at last without Christ! Great will be their responsibility, for great have been their privileges. Their fond parent, now in heaven, trained them up in the way they should go. Like the father of the faithful, he commanded his children and his household after him, that they should keep the way of the Lord, doing justice and judgment; and with him this was not so much the authoritative language of precept, as the silent eloquence of a holy example- an example of great kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long. suffering. He walked within his house with a perfect heart, and bore testimony to the importance and pleasantness of religion by his devotedness to the work of the Lord, his attachment to the ordinances of the Gospel, his love to good men of every creed, and his exertions for the advancement of the Redeemer's kingdom on the earth. He was a warm friend and supporter of the great voluntary institutions of the day for the spread of the truth. To the Bible and Missionary Societies, in particular, he contributed largely by his counsel, influence, and substance; and to the service of the former as treasurer to one of its branches, was consecrated the last effort of his useful life. After a long enjoyment of almost un. interrupted health, it pleased the Father of spirits in 1834 to place our friend in the school of affliction, where he spent the residue of his earthly pilgrimage. He was thrice seized with alarming fits of apo plexy, the last of which terminated his mortal career on the first day of April in the present year. During his long and trying affliction, the writer of this had fre. quent opportunities of witnessing his patience and resignation to the Divine will. He submitted himself without a murmur to the arrangements of providence, tasting that the Lord is gracious, and acknowledg. ing that he did all things well. He spoke much of his own unworthiness as an un profitable servant, and rejoiced exceedingly in the freeness of the redemption that is in Christ Jesus. He rested all his hopes on the everlasting covenant, and from it he derived strong consolation in time of pecu. liar need. The Saviour's love was the theme on which he delighted to dwell, and his ability to keep that which he had com. mitted unto Him against that day, gave him peace in the valley of the shadow of death. * Now to the God of victory

Immortal thanks be paid,
Who makes us conquerors while we die,

Through Christ our living Head."
Holyhead,

W.G. 15th Dec. 1836.

gratify their wishes and answer their re. quests. On the last sabbath evening of the year 1836, her minister preached from Luke ii. 34, “Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising again of many in Israel." The discourse was delivered under a solemn im. pression of the twofold result attendant on the proclamation of the Gospel, accompanied with an earnest desire that the address might be blessed to the conversion of some individual; and under the influence of these feel. ings, the preacher proposed to hold a special meeting for prayer at the close of the service. It was held, and prayers suitable and fervent were offered ; the meeting closed, and so did the year, and the succeeding year drew near its termination, and often did the minister feel anxious to ascertain whether those prayers had been answered, and whether the sermon had produced any salutary and permanent impression ; but he heard nothing until, in December last, our young friend proposed herself as a candidate for church-fellowship, and in conversing on the change she had experienced, attributed her conviction of the importance of religion, and of her guilt and need of a Saviour, to that discourse. Let not any conclude they have laboured in vain, because the fruit does not at once appear, and henceforth let a deeper

MISS ELIZA HICKSON,

Of Wandsworth. The subject of this brief memoir, was the child of religious parents, who in early in fancy dedicated her to God, and from the dawn of reason carefully instructed her in the truths of the Gospel. Thus favoured, she was mercifully preserved from many of the snares of youth, and always maintained a correct deportment, and a regular obsery. ance of the external duties of religion. Her parents, however, knew that all this might exist without the possession of true piety, and earnestly besought the Father of Mercies that they might discover satisfactory evidences of that change of heart which is the foundation of true godliness. These desires increased, and these supplications became more fervent, when a little more than two years since, her eldest sister was united to the church of which ber parents have for many years been members; and it pleased Him, who has graciously promised to " pour His Spirit on the seed of his people,” to

of prayer.

During the period that had intervened, our young friend had passed through a severe mental conflict. The enemy of souls had endeavoured to shake her faith in the Divine authority of the Scriptures; and although exempt from external immorality, which many erroneously suppose alone constitutes sin ; yet, such was her sense of guilt and exposure to God's wrath, should the Bible be true, that there were moments of despondency when she was tempted to wish it might be false. But the conviction that the Bible was the word of God still remained, and all anxiety on this important question was removed by the perusal of Dr. Henderson's valuable work on the Inspiration of the Scriptures. Still, however, guilt pressed on her conscience, until she was enabled to discover the gracious provision for the ex. ercise of Divine mercy, through the obedi. ence unto death of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to come to Him weary and heavy laden, that she might have rest. At this period she derived much benefit from conversation with a Christian female friend. From her she learned that her feelings were not peculiar, and by her she was encouraged to apply to that compassionate Saviour who has said, “ Him that cometh to me I will in nowise cast out." Such a friend is invaluable. One of the last acts of the deceased was to address a letter to her beloved guide and sister in the Lord; it remains unfinished, death prevented its completion.

The proposal to join a Christian church connexion with accounts of the sermons she was the unbiassed act of her own judgment · had heard, associated with expressions of and sense of duty; yet was not the proposal esteem and affection for her pastor. made without first consulting her beloved In her conversation also she aimed at use. parents, which she did by a note distinguished fulness. When conversing a few weeks alike by affection, humility, and piety. since with her sister, she remarked how Having received their cordial concurrence much more might be done by private Chris. and the approval of her minister, and the tians for the salvation of souls, if they would members of the church having expressed but embrace the opportunities of doing good their satisfaction at the report of their mes which were presented to them; and added, senger, she was admitted to the privileges of she thought that Christians did not suffici. Christian communion, on the 1st of Feb. ently consider this. As a proof that she ruary last, in company with her youngest considered this and felt its importance, it sister ; and on the following Sabbath com may be stated, that within a fortnight of her memorated the Saviour's death, together death, on returning from a visit with the ser. with her parents and sisters—a delightful vant of a friend, she conversed on religious sight-an entire family. Alas! how soon topics nearly the whole of the way, and has a breach been made; but it is the Lord, especially on sudden death, and the importand though part be in heaven, and part yet ance of being prepared for such an event. on earth, the Church of Christ is one, and The subject of death indeed seems to have ere long will meet as such, in that world been much on her mind. On a friend rewhere separation is unknown.

marking to her one day, that though she Though the period of Christian profession hoped she loved Christ, yet she could not was short, the evidences of genuine piety overcome the fear of death; she replied, were most satisfactory. All who knew her “I think that arises from a want of more were prepared to welcome her as a disciple implicit confidence in God and reliance upon of Christ, so marked was the influence of Christ.” On the Wednesday previous to the Gospel on her disposition and the whole her death, without any apparent prospect of of her deportment. She possessed a strong it, when conversing on ordinary affairs, she mind, which she cultivated by a judicious remarked, “ We do not know that we may course of reading; and having a good me ever want those things, how many persons mory, acquired a store of information and a die young ?When alluding to the whole solidity of judgment attained by few at her family belonging to the church, she said, age. She appeared habitually to act from “And what can we think of more delightful principle, and having made up her mind as than a whole family in heaven ?" In notes to what was right, to have followed her con addressed to her younger sister, she says, victions with a decision and an energy which “Let us never forget the uncertainty and disregarded all inferior considerations. instability of all earthly things.” “Never

Her closet was a much loved spot; and let us forget life's uncertainty." That we thither, in addition to her morning and even may not, God has been pleased to make her ing devotions, she regularly retired twice in sudden removal a solemn illustration and the day, to hold secret communion with memento of the fact. On Friday, the 25th God. In the house of God she was atten- of May, she was so unwell as to require tive and devout. It was her practice to medical assistance, but until Monday there write all she could remember of the morning appeared no cause for alarm ; but on the sermon on her return from the sanctuary; Tuesday morning the short journey of life and a Christian friend, to whom during ill. closed, and our beloved young friend exness she read the notes of one of these dis changed time for eternity, and, we doubt not, courses, has expressed astonishment.both earth for heaven, having but a few months at their extent and apparent correctness. before entered on her 19th year. Her death

Her piety was also active. As a collector was so unexpected, that there was little opof the Ladies' Bible Association she was portunity for ascertaining the state of her distinguished by an unwearied zeal, which mind. She appeared, however, to have exrose above discouragement, and led her to perienced a holy tranquillity of spirit, and stimulate others to the good work. On the said to a friend on the night preceding her last Sabbath she attended public worship, decease, “ It is all right, my heavenly Fa. she took a part in the Sabbath School, and ther cannot do wrong." And who can expressed her readiness to become a stated doubt it? He doeth all things well, and teacher should a vacancy occur. Little did then is it especially well, when our hope of she or her parents imagine that her period those we follow to the tomb, rests less on of labour was so soon to close.

their dying than on their living testimony Her correspondence, especially with her to their faith and love and devotedness to young friends, was always directed to some Christ. Her funeral sermon was preached useful purpose, and the subject of religion to a crowded audience, by her pastor, from was almost invariably introduced, often in 1 Thess. iv. 13, 14.

J. E. R.

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N. B. A few of the above sums were voted at the Annual Meeting in May. The Trustees

deeply regret, that through the neglect of Widows or Ministers, several of the Midsummer applications have not been made. They beg to repeat, that they can in no case make grants without application.

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