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We select the following passages from some of the speeches deli. vered at the meeting after the reading of the report :

“I have listened with very great interest to the Report. It has deeply affected my mind. There is something exceedingly touching about it. I am glad to find that there are to be some lectures, as means of increasing your religious and biblical knowledge. For, much as I approve that you should meet together for prayer, I know also that there is great danger about social religious exercises-danger of certain natural feelings, not of the best kind, coming into play. These must be balanced by your not thinking too highly. neither of religious excitement as such, or of your power or opportunities of producing it; I like, therefore, the idea, that you are to be called together, with some others, not members of your Society, not supposed to be possessed of those spiritual principles that qualify them for membership, but yet your associates and companions; that thus solid instruction may be conveyed, and your minds interested in exploring the Scriptures in another way, not contrary to, but distinct from, the mere reading of them for devotional purposes. You know, there are two ways of reading the Bible. You may read it to get some spiritual food for your soul; and a single text, at times, may do for that. But there is also an intellectual reading of the Scriptures, reading them to obtain enlarged and general views of their wonderful character, to see and understand something of their varied information; and I am persuaded of this, that a young man of good sense, already pious, who brings his intellect and his understanding to the study of the Scriptures in this way, will find his piety all the stronger and the healthier for it. .

“I was very much struck with some of the passages in the Report, on the subject of what we may call the secondary influence of these bodies of young men in some of the large establishments. One of the greatest things upon the earth, one of the chief manifestions of the divine power of Christianity, is its secondary influence upon society,—the influence of the church upon the world; so that, by its silent, gradual modification of the views, the opinions, and habits of individuals and nations, the world that is not converted, the world that does not become spiritual, is yet a great deal the gainer. I observed, that in some of the instances in the Report, there was a manifest influence going forth, and exerted over the whole body of young men : and they felt it, even though there might not be positive cases of what we call actual conversion ; and that is a step gained. .. .

“Ah! you do not know so well as I do, and some of us that are older men, that have been called in to see those whose course of sin has been run, and who have had strange revelations made to us of the human heart and conscienceyou do not know the difference between the recollections of a man that has been the means of bringing a soul to God, and the recollections of a man that has been the means of leading one away. Oh, my dear friends, to be the means of influencing some young man, fixing his character, saving him from temptation, leading him to God; and for that young man to rise up, and to exert his in. fluence as a child of God! Or for a man to have to reflect By lending that book, I polluted that mind; by taking that individual to the theatre, I led him further-led him from purity and righteousness, and made him bad; by this and that, I sapped the principles of such a man, and infused sceptical sugges. tions!' Ah, I have known it, when men have been themselves converted, and have awoke to all the turpitude of this, that they have gone and entreated and besought the individuals whom they had injured in their opinions and their characters, to reconsider and reform; — and they have been laughed at and spurned by their own disciples! and they have gone away with this dagger in their hearts; and it has stuck there as long as they lived, in spite of their hope that they had themselves reecived pardon, and were safe in God's mercy." - Rev. T. Binney. “The influence which you may exert upon your employers, likewise, is not to

* These were delivered during the months of December, January, February. As they are shortly to be published, we postpone any notice of them.

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be overlooked. If that high character is maintained, which those who ente into an Association like this ought to labour hard and pray fervently to secure. I can hardly conceive anything more calculated to make the employers of London desire, that all the young men of their establishments should join it. If, in addition to that manliness and good sense of which Mr. Binney has spoken, you are anxious to acquire common knowledge, as far as your leisure permits, so that in all ordinary matters you may have perhaps a wiser opinion and more information than the ungodly young men with whom you are associated; if your employers perceive that you have more sagacity in the management of business than other young men of equal ability ; if they see that there are no youths in their establishment, on whose honour, integrity, and faithfulness, they can so thoroughly rely; if they feel that you are precisely the men who most watch for their interests, and best secure them; you perceive at once bow you may recommend religion to any employers who are thoughtless, and instead of leading any to use their influence against such an Association as yonrs, make them heartily desirous, that in their establishments also those prayer meetings may be begun, those libraries raised, and those associations of a religious kind be seen, which are found to promote the good morals of a community, as well as the salvation of the soul.

"It was interesting also to consider the influence which your Association may have upon some who would otherwise be placed in very painful circumstances in this metropolis. A young man, placed among many who make a mock at religion, would be in a position exceedingly trying; and perhaps many a young man has come up to this metropolis, to whom, because he was unacquainted with any religious friend and saw nothing but irreligion around him, it has had the gloomiest possible aspect. Your Association tends entirely to alter his ideas; for he may find his solitude at once changed into a blest society; instead of finding himself alone, he learns that there is a large brotherhood, on whose frien lliness and affection he can rely. What an unspeakable comfort and advantage to a young man coming up to this city, to think-Here are two hundred warm hearts ready to welcome me; I may find at once two hundred, to whom, by the sole passport of similar principles and similar faith, I may gain access, to obtain their confidence and their friendly services!' I once travelled from Geneva to the foot of Mont Blanc, and when I set out, along that beautiful valley, the day was lowering and cloudy, and nothing could be more gloomy than the scene, for there rested a mist upon all the face of nature, and I could see nothing else around me: such is the aspect of London to a young man, finding nothing about him but ungodliness, and temptation, and selfishness. But as the day advanced, the sun burst through those mists, and as they evaporated, I saw forest after forest, and mountain rising above mountain, till the glittering snow summits around me were reflecting a cloudless sun, and all nature at my feet caught the glowing radiance, and the scene lately so dismal was blooming like paradise: such is London to that young man, when he comes into this Association. He thought all was vice, and he finds those who have learned through faith in Christ to soar high above those vicious indulgences, that mar instead of causing happiness: he thought all was folly, and he finds in many an early wisdom that urges him on in its pursuit; he thought all was selfishness and coldness, and he finds that the grace of God, here as elsewhere, can give an affectionate heart and a warm sympathy to the disciples of Jesus; and when he has spent a few years among such friends as these, to whatever part of the wide world his steps may carry him, London will be the home of his heart; because he will remember that there he found what most strengthened his principles, doomed his character, fixed his course for eternity, and helped him on his way to God. This is as it should be. What an important blessing may such an Association be to young men, who are beginning to feel their way towards Christ, and who yet need support!"-Honourable and Rev. Baptist W. Noel.

"I do not know a single object, in which we are more bound to unite, than that which has convened us. I do not know a class of people in London, more neglected than the assistants in the great establishments, which have been coining money, honestly or dishonestly. Why, what, in the mass of cases, is the aspect in which these young men have been regarded? Of course there have been great and noble exceptions, but in general they have been looked upon as neither more nor less than a species of physiological machines, from whom, as from a steam engine, a certain amount of work was required, and if that was done, nothing more was thought respecting them. As to their moral condition, as to their spiritual state, as to their preparation for the everlasting world, as to their habits out of the house, or in the house, beyond the mere routine of duty which they were required to perform, the question in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred was never put; if the employer received a certain amount of task work which he had assigned to the individual, no question was asked; and sometimes, the more roguish and knavish the assistant was, if but successful, the more he was approved. And so it has been with multitudes of people ; no class has been more neglected and despised by them than this ; they have looked upon the young men as individuals with whom for a moment they came into contact, but about whose temporal comforts or moral interests they were never called upon to think. I speak liable to correction, and making the exception due to many, and let those be honoured and applauded who have been better than the system, and have stood out nobly above it; but I believe the system has been, that where there has been talent, quickness, shrewdness, politeness of manners, but an absence of moral principle, that youth has been preferred to one of less brilliant talent, less winning manners, but of deep-toned piety and high consistency of life. This is a bad state of things for the principals as well as for the assistants ; for they may rest convinced of this, that ordinary ability and ordinary industry, conibined with high Christian principle, will do more for them, and bring a richer blessing upon their establishinent, than great shrewdness, and high talent, and bold enterprise, unsanctified by piety, and unguided by moral principle.

" What can be more wretched than the case of a young man coming into such an establishirent from the country, fresh, untutored, and ignorant of the ways of this metropolis ? Ile wishes to keep the Sabbath; he goes to Mr. Noel's place of worship, or to Dr. Leifchild's, and he maintains regular habits of attendance for a few weeks or months. But around him the meshes are gradually closing in, within which he is to be entangled; it is suggested to him that a little stroll on the Sabbath day, or a drive to Richmond, or a trip to Gravesend, will do him no harm; it is cnly for a little fresh air. He has none to back him up against the temptation ; if there had been but one single youth to cheer him by a single word, to invoke the tender memories and sweet associtions of the home he has left, and the happy life he spent in simplicity untarnished, untarnished it might still remain. But there is no one to address him in strains like these, or to counsel him to avoid that first fatal step, the begin. ning of a course whose end is the complete overthrow of consistency of character, and the loss of virtuous principle, which is invariably the loss of moral power. . . . : : * “ I am glad to find in this Society such a perfect union. The age in which we live is demanding that union; and I think, ainidst all our distractions, un hallowed as they have been, there is a growing progress towards that union, The day has been, when people would not have dreamt of such aneetings as that which we have held at Liverpool, or that at Dr. Leifchild's chapel some time since, when eight or nine denominations met around the Lord's table. Nor my hope is, that young men, by being brought together, will catch a spirito love to each other, which no changes in life can utterly destroy. Episcopalian Wesleyan, Congregationalist, Presbyterian, Baptist, will all meet, praying to gether, feeling together, loving together; and they will go out breathing that spirit, inoculated with it, having it stereotyped upon their hearts. Oh! let all feel, amidst the convulsions that have rent one church in our country, and are rending part of another, and amidst the cold-heartedness of a union which is that of coercion or of bribery, that there is a substantial union between church men and dissenters, between those who love their common Master, whether the worship in this place or in that; and that there is the power of a living prind ple, stronger to keep them together, than all points of denominational distinct tion are to repel and separate them.

“ All this is delightful and encouraging. Our age is an age of inquiry a an age of excitement; but, thank God, not of danger. The church will

purified and increased by all such excitement and controversy ; and the effect of error coming into collision with truth is but to bring out truth in brighter glory, and to reflect its lustre more brilliantly upon the earth. Let each of us feel, that in this work of yours, in bringing a single soul to Christ, he accomplishes an unspeakahly grand achievement. The sculptor elaborates a monument, until it almost breathes; and the painter seems to command the ruddy stream of life to blush and play in glowing colours on the canvass. Both labour for the immortality of time, and their noblest work shall perish. You aspire after a fame that shall never die ; and the images you fashion are images that no power can destroy, and no time can change. Then, work-work now-work ever; inspired by the animating and sublime conception, that you are working with God, and working for eternity."- The Rev. Dr. Archer.

The Early Closing Movement.

MEETING OF THE METROPOLITAN DRAPERS' ASSOCIATION

IN COVENT-GARDEN THEATRE.. The greatest meeting ever held for the promotion of this object, was this, the fourth annual meeting of the above association. Long before the appointed time the whole building was thronged to excess, ard hundreds, unable to gain admission, were compelled to go away. It was a cheering sight. The chairman !-he it was who has devoted his life, his strength of body and mind, to the amelioration of the condition of the working classes, and to the annihilation of this late-hour system—a system by which the young and the unprotected, those whom poverty has compelled to toil for an existence, are fearfully injured ; and which is as disgraceful to the community among whom it is permitted to exist, as it is degrading to those who suffer,-Lord Ashley was, indeed, of all persons pre-eminently fitted to preside on such an occasion. And then the audience !-Members of Parliament, clergymen, and ministers of all denominations; medical men of the highest standing; men of science and literature, were there: all came to lend the cause their sanction and support, and ready to plead for the suffer. ing and wronged, and to bear testimony to the long catalogue of evils entailed by this system. Many of these very sufferers, for whom the speakers were pleading with so much fervour and eloquence, were there ; in whose breasts the words, as they were poured forth, found a deep and a painful response. Anxiously, yet with delight, did they watch the lips and action of the successive speakers, and the effect with which each pathetic appeal told on the multitude of listeners. Employers were there—they who have it so much in their power to promote the comfort and the happiness of those who serve them. Did they not, too, respond to the solemn appeals made to them? “We say," said Mr. Thompson, “we are your friends, as well as the friends of these young men. Their morals are a matter of importance to you.

* An official Report has been published by Messrs. Aylott and Jones, price 2d.

been great and noble exceptions, but in general they have been looked upon as neither more nor less than a species of physiological machines, from whom, as from a steam engine, a certain amount of work was required, and if that was done, nothing more was thought respecting them. As to their moral condition, as to their spiritual state, as to their preparation for the everlasting world, as to their habits out of the house, or in the house, beyond the mere routine of duty which they were required to perform, the question in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred was never put; if the employer received a certain amount of task work which he had assigned to the individual, no question was asked ; and sometimes, the more roguish and knavish the assistant was, if but successful, the more he was approved. And so it has been with multitudes of people ; no class has been more neglected and despised by them than this ; they have looked upon the young men as individuals with whom for a moment they came into contact, but about whose ternporal comforts or moral interests they were never called upon to think. I speak liable to correction, and making the exception due to many, and let those be honoured and applauded who have been better than the system, and have stood out nobly above it; but I believe the system has been, that where there has been talent, quickness, shrewdness, politeness of manners, but an absence of moral principle, that youth has been preferred to one of less brilliant talent, less winning manners, but of deep-toned piety and high consis. tency of life. This is a bad state of things for the principals as well as for the assistants ; for they may rest convinced of this, that ordinary ability and ordi. nary industry, combined with high Christian principle, will do more for them, and bring a richer blessing upon their establishment, than great shrewdness, and high talent, and bold enterprise, unsanctified by piety, and unguided by moral principle.

• What can be more wretched than the case of a young man coming into such an establishirent from the country, fresh, untutored, and ignorant of the ways of this metropolis: IIe wishes to keep the Sabbath; he goes to Mr. Noel's place of worship, or to Dr. Leifchild's, and he maintains regular habits of attendance for a few weeks or months. But around him the meshes are gradually closing in, within which he is to be entangled; it is suggested to him that a little stroll on the Sabbath day, or a drive to Richmond, or a trip to Gravesend, will do him no harm; it is cnly for a little fresh air. He has none to back him up against the temptation ; if there had been but one single youth to cheer him by a single word, to invoke the tender memories and sweet associ. tions of the home he has left, and the happy life he spent in simplicity untarnished, untarnished it might still remain." But there is no one to address him in strains like these, or to counsel him to avoid that first fatal step, the beginning of a course whose end is the complete overthrow of consistency of character, and the loss of virtuous principle, which is invariably the loss of moral power. ..

"I am glad to find in this Society such a perfect union. The age in which we live is demanding that union; and I think, anidst all our distractions, unhallowed as they have been, there is a growing progress towards that union. The day has been, when people would not have dreamt of such meetings as that which we have held at Liverpool, or that at Dr. Leifchild's chapel some time since, when eight or nine denominations met around the Lord's table. Now my hope is, that young men, by being brought together, will catch a spirit of love to each other, which no changes in life can utterly destroy. Episcopalian, Wesleyan, Congregationalist, Presbyterian, Baptist, will all meet, praying to gether, feeling together, loving together; and they will go out breathing that spirit, inoculated with it, having it stereotyped upon their hearts. Oh! let us all feel, amidst the convulsions that have rent one church in our country, and are rending part of another, and amidst the cold-heartedness of a union which is that of coercion or of bribery, that there is a substantial union between churchmen and dissenters, between those who love their common Master, whether they worship in this place or in that; and that there is the power of a living principle, stronger to keep them together, than all points of denominational distinction are to repel and separate them.

" All this is delightful and encouraging. Our age is an age of inquiry and an age of excitement; but, thank God, not of danger. The church will be

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