Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

5

But Linden saw another sight,
When the drum beat at dead of night,
Commanding fires of death to light

The darkness of her scenery.

IQ

By torch and trumpet fast arrayed,
Each horseman drew his battle-blade,
And furious every charger neighed

To join the dreadful revelry.
Then shook the hills, with thunder riven;
'Then rushed the steed, to battle driven ;
And louder than the bolts of Heaven

Far flashed the red artillery.

15

But redder yet that light shall glow
On Linden's hills of stained snow,
And bloodier yet the torrent flow

Of Iser, rolling rapidly.

20

25

'Tis morn

; but scarce yon level sun Can pierce the war-clouds, rolling dun, Where furious Frank and fiery Hun

Shout in their sulphurous canopy.
The combat deepens. On, ye brave,
Who rush to glory, or the grave !
Wave, Munich, all thy banners wave,

And charge with all thy chivalry!
Few, few shall part, where many meet ;
The snow shall be their winding-sheet ;
And every turf beneath their feet
Shall be a soldier's sepulchre.

Thomas Campbell.

33

S

CCIX

IO

ON THE EXTINCTION OF THE VENETIAN

REPUBLIC.
Once did She hold the gorgeous East in fee,
And was the safeguard of the West ; the worth
Of Venice did not fall below her birth,
Venice, the eldest child of liberty.
She was a maiden City, bright and free;

5
No guile seduced, no force could violate ;
And when she took unto herself a mate,
She must espouse the everlasting Sea.
And what if she had seen those glories fade,
Those titles vanish, and that strength decay,–
Yet shall some tribute of regret be paid
When her long life hath reached its final day :
Men are we, and must grieve when even the shade
Of that which once was great has passed away.

William Wordsworth.

CCX
COMPOSED BY THE SEA-SIDE, NEAR CALAIS,

AUGUST, 1802.
Fair Star of Evening, Splendour of the West,
Star of my country!-on the horizon's brink
Thou hangest, stooping, as might seem, to sink
On England's bosom ; yet well pleased to rest,
Meanwhile, and be to her a glorious crest,

5
Conspicuous to the Nations. Thou, I think,
Should'st be my Country's emblem ; and should'st wink,
Bright Star! with laughter on her banners, drest
In thy fresh beauty. There! that dusky spot
Beneath thee, that is England; there it lies.
Blessings be on you both! one hope, one lot,
One life, one glory! I with many a fear
For my dear Country, many heartfelt sighs,
Among men who do not love her, linger here.

William Wordsworth.

IO

CCXI

NOVEMBER, 1806.

Another year!-another deadly blow!
Another mighty empire overthrown !
And we are left, or shall be left, alone ;
The last that dare to struggle with the foe.
'Tis well! from this day forward we shall know 5
That in ourselves our safety must be sought;
That by our own right hands it must be wrought ;
That we must stand unpropped, or be laid low.
O dastard whom such foretaste doth not cheer !
We shall exult, if they who rule the land
Be men who hold its many blessings dear,
Wise, upright, valiant ; not a servile band,
Who are to judge of danger which they fear,
And honour which they do not understand.

William Wordsworth.

[ocr errors]

CCXII

THE BURIAL OF SIR JOHN MOORE,

5

Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note,
As his corpse to the rampart we hurried ;
Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot
O’er the grave where our hero we buried.
We buried him darkly at dead of night,
The sods with our bayonets turning ;
By the struggling moonbeam's misty light,
And the lantern dimly burning.
No useless coffin enclosed his breast.
Not in sheet nor in shroud we wound him;
But he lay like a warrior taking his rest,
With his martial cloak around him.

IO

Few and short were the prayers we said,
And we spoke not a word of sorrow;
But we stedfastly gazed on the face that was dead,
And we bitterly thought of the morrow.

15

We thought as we hollowed his narrow bed,
And smoothed down his lonely pillow,
That the foe and the stranger would tread o'er his head,
And we far away on the billow !

20

Lightly they'll talk of the spirit that's gone,
And o'er his cold ashes upbraid him,-
But little he'll reck, if they let him sleep on
In the grave where a Briton has laid him.

25

But half of our heavy task was done,
When the clock struck the hour for retiring ;
And we heard the distant and random gun
That the foe was sullenly firing.

30

Slowly and sadly we laid him down,
From the field of his fame fresh and gory ;
We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone-
But we left him alone with his glory.

Charles Wolfe.

CCXIII

ODE TO NAPOLEON BUONAPARTE.

'Tis done—but yesterday a King !

And armed with Kings to strive-
And now thou art a nameless thing :

So abject-.yet alive!
Is this the man of thousand thrones,

5

IO

15

20

Who strewed our earth with hostile bones,

And can he thus survive ?
Since he, miscalled the Morning Star,
Nor man nor fiend hath fall'n so far.
Ill-minded man ! why scourge thy kind

Who bowed so low the knee?
By gazing on thyself grown blind,

Thou taught'st the rest to see.
With might unquestioned, -power to save,-
Thine only gift hath been the grave,

To those that worshipped thee ;
Nor till thy fall could mortals guess
Ambition's less than littleness !
Thanks for that lesson- it will teach

To after-warriors more
Than high Philosophy can preach,

And vainly preached before.
That spell upon the minds of men
Breaks, never to unite again,

That led them to adore
Those Pagod things of sabre sway,
With fronts of brass, and feet of clay.
The triumph, and the vanity,

The rapture of the strife-
The earthquake voice of Victory,

To thee the breath of life;
The sword, the sceptre, and that sway
Which man seemed made but to obey,

Wherewith renown was rife-
All quelled !- Dark Spirit! what must be
The madness of thy memory!
The Desolator desolate!

The Victor overthrown !
The Arbiter of others' fate

A suppliant for his own !

25

30

35

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »