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5. Now God invites; how blest the day!

How sweet the Gospel's charming sound !
Come, sinners, haste, O haste away,

While yet a pard’ning God is found.

DWIGHT.

310.

L. M.
1. Broad is the road that leads to death,

And thousands walk together there;
But wisdom shows a narrow path,

With here and there a traveler,
2. “Deny thyself, and take thy cross,"

Is the Redeemer's great command;
Nature must count her gold but dross,

If she would gain this heavenly land. 3. The fearful soul that tires and faints,

And walks the ways of God no more,
Is but esteemed almost a saint,

And makes his own destruction sure. 4. Lord! let not all my hopes be vain;

Create my heart entirely new,
Which hypocrites could ne'er attain;

Which false apostates never knew.

WATTS.

311.

L. M.
1. Behold the path that mortals tread

Down to the regions of the dead !
Nor will the fleeting moments stay,

Nor can we measure back our way.
2. Our kindred and our friends are gone;

Know, O my soul, this doom thine own:
Feeble as theirs, my mortal frame,

The same my way, my house the same. 3. And must I from the cheerful light,

Pass to the grave's perpetual night-
From scenes of duty, means of grace,
Must I to God's tribunal pass ?

4. Awake, my soul, thy way prepare,

And lose, in this, each mortal care;
With steady feet that path be trod,
Which through the grave conducts to God.

WARDLAW'S COLL. 312.

L. M.
1. LORD! what a thoughtless wretch was I

Το
mourn,
and murmur,

and repine,
To see the wicked, placed on high,

In pride and robes of honor shine! 2. But Oh! their end, their dreadful end !

Thy sanctuary taught me so;
On slippery rocks I see them stand,

And fiery billows roll below.
3. Their fancied joys-how fast they flee!

Just like a dream when man awakes;
Their songs

of softest harmony
Are but a prelude to their plagues.
4. Now I esteem their mirth and wine

Too dear to purchase with my blood;
Lord ! 't is enough that Thou art mine,

My life, my portion, and my God.

WATTS,

313.

L. M.
1. Say, sinner! hath a voice within

Oft whispered to thy secret soul,
Urged thee to leave the ways of sin,

And yield thy heart to God's control ? 2. Sinner! it was a heavenly voice,

It was the Spirit's gracious call;
It bade thee make the better choice,

And haste to seek in Christ thine all. 3. Spurn not the call to life and light;

Regard, in time, the warning kind;
That call thou may'st not always slight,

And yet the gate of mercy find.

4. God's Spirit will not always strive

With hardened, self-destroying man;
Ye who persist His love to greive,

May never hear His voice again. 5. Sinner! perhaps, this very day,

Thy last accepted time may be :
Oh! should'st thou grieve Him now away,

Then hope may never beam on thee. HYDR.

314.

L. M.
1. Now, in the heat of youthful blood,

Remember your Creator, God;
Behold! the months come hastening on,

When you shall say, “ My joys are gone." 2. Behold! the aged sinner goes,

Laden with guilt and heavy woes,
Down to the regions of the dead,

With endless curses on his head. 3. The dust returns to dust again;

The soul, in agonies of pain,
Ascends to God—not there to dwell-
But hears her doom, and sinks to hell.
Eternal King! I fear Thy name :
Teach me to know how frail I am;
And when my soul must hence remove,
Give me a mansion in Thy love.

WATTS,

315.

L. M.
1. Man has a soul of vast desires;

He burns within with restless fires;
Tossed to and fro, his passions fly

From vanity to vanity.
2. In vain on earth we hope to find

Some solid good to fill the mind;
We try new pleasures, but we feel
The inward thirst and torment still.

3. So, when a raging fever burns,

We shift from side to side, by turns;
And 't is a poor relief we gain,

To change the place, but keep the pain.
4. Great God, subdue this vicious thirst,

This love to vanity and dust;
Cure the vile fever of the mind,
And feed our souls with joys refined..

WATTS.

316.

C. M.
1. WERE not the sinful Mary's tears

An offering worthy heaven,
When o'er the faults of former years

She wept, and was forgiven ?
2. When, bringing every balmy sweet

Her day of luxury stored,
She o'er her Saviour's hallowed feet

The precious perfume poured, -
3. Were not those sweets so humbly shed,

That hair, those weeping eyes,
And the sunk heart which inly bled,

Heaven's noblest sacrifice ?
4. Thou that hast slept in error's sleep,

O, wouldst thou wake to heaven,
Like Mary kneel, like Mary weep;
“Love much," and be forgiven!

MOORE. 317.

C. M.
1. SWEET day! so cool, so calm, so bright,

Bridal of earth and sky;
The dew shall weep thy fall to-night,

For thou, alas ! must die.
2. Sweet rose ! in air whose odors wave,

And color charms the eye;
Thy root is even in the ground,

And thou, alas ! must die.

3. Sweet spring! of days and roses made,

Whose charms for beauty vie,
Thy days depart, thy roses fade,

Thou, too, alas ! must die.
4. Only a sweet and holy soul

Hath tints that never fly:
While flowers decay, and seasons roll,

It lives, and can not die.

HERBERT.

318.

C. M.
1. In evil long I took delight,

Unawed by shame or fear,
Till a new. object struck my sight,

And stopped my wild career.
2. I saw One hanging on a tree,

In
agony

and blood;
Who fixed His languid eyes on me,

As near the cross I stood.
3. Sure never, till my latest breath,

Can I forget that look ;
It seemed to charge me with His death,

Though not a word He spoke.
4. Alas, I knew not what I did,

But all my tears were vain;
Where could my trembling soul be hid,

For I the Lord had slain.
5. A second look He gave, that said,

"I freely all forgive;
This blood is for thy ransom paid,-

I die that thou may’st live.” NEWTON.

319.

C. M.
1. YE wretched, hungry, starving poor,

Behold a royal feast !
Where mercy spreads her bounteous store,

For every humble guest.

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