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THE TOIL OF NURSING.

patience the endless fretfulness of hundreds of sick, to listen to long complaints with real sympathy, and speak soothing words when body and mind are alike worn. To stand by the sufferer when about to undergo some fearful operation, to maintain a cheerful spirit when the familiar sounds are those of moans, of sufferings, or sharp cries of agony, while the very atmosphere is impregnated with disease. To be firm in carrying out the doctor's commands when they are a torture to the patients, and yet gentle and self-sacrificing in all that concerns themselves. While watchful care must be taken that familiarity with the sight and sound of suffering does not bring that hardening to it which is apt to creep over even a naturally tender nature, and which is one great cause of the cruelty and neglect practised by hospital nurses. No, a good nurse must receive every new case of affliction as though it were her first. Yet all this and far more

VIEWS OF NURSING.

273

would be the portion of a hospital nurse. Can any believe that the love of gain or mere kindliness of heart can accomplish this ? Generous impulses, enthusiasm, and benevolence, were called forth by stirring accounts of the suffering of our country's heroes, and bore many forth to struggle through a time which, like that of all passing distress, was one of great excitement; but the spirit that can go through long years of preparation—that can relinquish the fair things of this world to attend upon the grievously afflicted—must be the one of love springing from the sole desire to follow His steps, who came “not to be ministered unto, but to minister.”

THE END.

VOL. II.

T

Just Published, in Two Vols., 21s. bound, JOURNAL OF ADVENTURES WITH

THE BRITISII ARMY; FROM THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE WAR

TO THE FALL OF SEBASTOPOL.

BY GEORGE CAVENDISH TAYLOR, LATE 95TH REGT.

“In the journal of an intelligent and impartial observer, who had opportunities of becoming personally cognisant of the facts, and who deposes to them without fear or favour, we may expect to find the most faithful representation of what actually took place. Such a witness we have in the author of the volumes before usan officer who, having sold out before the war was thought of, was unable under the existing arrangements to obtain active employment in the service, but was in. duced by his military spirit and love of adventure to proceed to the scene of the conflict. Mingling as he naturally did with his former brother officers, he had opportunities of obtaining information, and of seeing things with his own eyes, such as no civilian could hope to enjoy, and he brought moreover to his observations & certain amount of professional discernment which would enable him to form a readier and more correct judgment. The evidence which these volumes contain is exceedingly valuable. The real state of things is here exhibited in true colours, considerable light is thrown on the general conduct of the war and the condition of our army; and on many of the points so hotly controverted, the pages before us furnish materials for a tolerably clear and impartial judgment.”—John Bull.

" Mr. Taylor's Journal of Adventures with the British Army' has the merit of being a journal one who participated in nearly the whole series of events. It is valuable for its genuineness, and for the extent of experience embraced in it.”— Examiner.

“ There was scarcely an occurrence of any importance that Mr. Taylor was not an eye-witness of; Balaklava, Inkermann, Kertch, the operations in the Sea of Azoff, Anapa, the unsuccessful and also the second and glorious storming of the Malakhoff and Redan, and the taking possession of Sebastopol. Each event is detailed in that concise but clear professional style which we have not met with before.”—United Service Gazette.

Also, Immediately, in Two Vols. 8vo., with Portraits, 30s, bound, MEMOIRS OF THE

OF THE COURT

OF THE REGENCY. FROM ORIGINAL FAMILY DOCUMENTS. BY THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM & CHANDOS, K.G., &c.

Among the subjects elucidated in this work will be found:-The Personal His. tory of the Prince of Wales, with notices of his principal friends, public and private; the Career of the Princess of Wales at Home and Abroad; the last great European Coalition against Napoleon ; Mrs. Fitzherbert and the Prince; Sheridan at Carlton House; the Visit of the Sovereigns to England; the Marchioness of Hertford's influence with the Regent; the Conduct of the Princess Charlotte; the private Negotiations of the Marquis Wellesley and Mr. Canning; the Secret Policy of the Cabinet; Russian Intrigues; Proceedings of Viscount Castlereagh and the Duke of Wellington, &c.

HURST AND BLACKETT, PUBLISHERS, SUCCESSORS TO HENRY

COLBURN, 13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH ST., LONDON.

NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

PUBLISHED BY

MESSRS. HURST AND BLACKETT,

SUCCESSORS TO MR. COLBURN.

4

HURST AND BLACKETT'S NEW PUBLICATIONS.

MEMOIRS AND CORRESPONDANCE OF MAJOR

GENERAL SIR W. NOTT, G.C.B., CONXANDER OF THE ARNY OF CarDAHAB AND ENVOY AT THE Corst or Locanow. EDITED BY J. H. STOCQUELER, Esq., at the request of the Daughters of the late General, from Private Papers and Obcial Documents in their possession. 2 rols. 8vo., with Portrait. 2ss. bound.

“ One of the most valuable and interesting books that can ever claim a permanent place in a British sibrary."-Standard

“These bigt.y interesting volumes give a va'satie coctrbation to the history of India and an agoirabie portrait of a most uistinguisted officer.”—Johs Bull.

Th-se Memors with the Correspondence inued in thean will do that justice to the part played by Sir W. Noit in the Afghan war, which it is undeniable preceding works bare (abied lodu."-Atheneum,

These memoirs of General Nott, whom the editor very justly describes as a model offcer,' bave been given to the word at the instigation of the hero's surviving daugoters. A more gracetui tribute of dutiful affection to the merory of a departed parent it would be d. 1st to name. It is at once a graphie picture of the soldier's career, and a noble Donu. ment of his fame. The wirk issues from the press at a very fortunate moment. The life of an officer who followed in the footsteps of Wellington, making the Despatcbes of that illustrious warrior his continual study, will be weicomed by many an aspirant for military redown at this exciting crisis. The volumes form a valuable contribution to the biographical stores of the age. To the young soldier, in particular, they will form a most valuable guide, worthy to be piaced by the side of the Despatcbes of the great Duke of Wellington."— Messenger.

" When the late General Noti died, the “Quarterly Review' expressed a hope that some means would be taken for giving publicity to his private letters and official correspondence, because they so completely illustrated his high and chivalrous character, while a memoir of his life would bold out so admirabie a lesson to British statesmen, and so good an example to young officers. We are happy, therefore, to find that, under the abie editorship of Mr. Stocqueler, the whole of the most valuable portion of the general's correspondence bas just been published in two hardsome volumes, which comprise also a most interesting memoir of the gallant hero of Candahar, giving a complete account of the stirring campaign in Affghanistan, and throwing much light upon many important points hitherto left in obscurity. The work will be eagerly welcomed by all-more particularly by military readers and those interested in our Indian dominions."--Globe.

A biography of a first-rate soldier, and a highly honourable man. The book will often be appealed to as a standard authority. A valuable and most authentic addition is here furnished to the true history of transactions which will ever hold a prominent place i the annals of our Indian rule.”Dublin Unirersity Mag.

“We know not a book after the Wellington Despatches, more deserving of the study of a young officer. It might be made one of the standard manuals of military education."Literary Gazette.

This book is one of the most interesting records of military life that we possess, and a genuine memorial of one who has achieved a right to be reckoned among England's greatest men.”-Daily News.

NARRATIVE OF A RESIDENCE AT NEPAUL. BY

CAPTAIN THOMAS SMITH, late Assistant POLITICAL-RESIDENT AT
NEPAUL. 2 vols. post 8vo. 21s.

“No man conld be better qualified to describe Nepaul than Captain Smith; and his concise, but clear and graphic account of its history, its natural productions, its laws and customs, and the character of its warlike inhabitants, is very agreeable and instructive reading. A separate cl:apter, not the least entertaining in the book, is devoted to anecdotes of the Nepaulese niission, of whom, and of their visit to Europe, mauy remarkable stories are told."-Pust.

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