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the author's explanation of the horse-
men and horses, ib. ; the objects of theim
mission, 409; view of the future state of
kuman affairs, from the prophecies of Da-
niel, ib.; the number of the angelic troops,
80., ib. ; explanation of the colour of the
horses, 410; and of the concluding
part of the vision, 411; the second
part of the prophet's vision considered,
ib.; the four horns, 8c. explained, 412;
some discrepancies in the author's in-
terpretation, ib.; the third part of the
vision, 413; the fourth part consider-
ed, ib.; introduclory peragraph explana-
lory of thus part, ib.; the fifth part,
consisting of the golden candlestick
and the olive trees, 414; the author's
general view of the several represen-
tations of the visiou, 415; the womer
with wings, explained, ib.; the four

chariots with coloured horses, 416.
Strafford, Earl of, baseness and impolicy

of King Charles's abandonment of him

198.
Struensee, Count, Munter's narrative o

his conversion and death, with intro
duction and notes, by the late Dr

Rennel, 570, et seq.
Seift's notes on Bishop Burnel's history o

his own times, 495, 6; character of Swise

by Speaker Onslow, 497.
Talnier, fort of, circumstances connected will

the slorming and surrender of it to Sin

John Hislop, 580, 1.
Taylor's Caldiet's dictionary of the holy

bible, 454, et seq. ; great improve-
ments in the present edition, 454,5
contents of the respective volumes,
456.

Jane, contributions of Q. Q. to
a periodical work, &c. 432, et seq.
probability of the lasting fame of
many modern writers for children,
ib.; unprecedented success of the
poems, hymns, &c. written by the
present author and her sister, &c
432, 3; remarks on her pieces in the

associate minstrels,' ib. ; Display, a
tale, 434; essays in rhyme on moral
and men, ib., origin of the presen
papers, ib.; their character, ib.; "thu
discontented pendulum, 435, 6; moral,
437; 'the philosophical scales,' 437, e
3.q.; moral, 439; how il strikes
stranger,' 440, et seq.; now and then,
444, et seq.; on visiting Cowper's gar-
den and summer-house at Olney,
446, 7.
Testament, New, the books of it actually

written by the Evangelists and the
Apostles, 210.

the author's explanation of the horse- Testament, Old, not corrupted by the
men and horses, ib. ; the objects of their Jews, 216.
mission, 409; view of the future state of The discontented pendulum, 435, et seq. ;
human affuirs, from the prophecies of Da moral, 437.
niel, ib.; the number of the angelic troops, Thugs, a predatory people of central India,
&c., ib. ; erplanation of the colour of the descriplion of them, 118.
horses, 410; and of the concluding Tour, horticultural, through Flanders,
part of the vision, 411; the second Holland, and France, by a deputation
part of the prophet's vision considered, from the society, &c.; great alten-
ib. ; the four horns, &c. explained, 412; tion to 'arboraceous decoration in the
some discrepancies in the author's in Netherlands, 560, 1; character of the
terpretation, ib. ; the third part of the Antwerp journal, 561; prevalence of
vision, 413; the fourth part consider popish superstition at Antwerp, ib. ; pri-
ed, ib.; introductory, paragraph explana vileges of the stork, in Holland, 562 ;
lory of this part, ib. ; the fifth part, present state of the Dutch Tulipoma-
coosisting of the golden candlestick nia, 563 ; bronze statue of Erasmus,
and the olive trees, 414; the author's ib.; the palm of Clusius at Leyden,
general view of the several represen 564 ; appearance of the Rhine at Ley-
tations of the visiou, 415; the women den, ib. ; the Stadt house at Amsterdam,
with wings, explained, ib. ; the four 564, 5; description of the Jewesses, at

chariots with coloured horses, 416. Amsterdam, on a fair day, 565; remarks
Strafford, Earl of, baseness and impolicy on the present state of the embankments,

of King Charles's abandonment of bim, &c. in Holland, 566.
198.

Townley's answer to the Abbé Dubois,
Struensee, Count, Munter's narrative of &c., 61.

his conversion and death, with intro Traveller, the modern, 150, et seq.; cha-
duction and notes, by the late Dr. racter and plan of the work, 151; con-
Rennel, 570, et seq.

cluding remarks upon Palestine, 151, et
Stoill's notes on Bishop Burnet's history of seg. ; execution of the work, 153.

his own times, 495, 6; character of Swift,
by Speaker Onslow, 497.

Universities, American, compared with

the Scottish, 83.
Talnier, fort of, circumstances connected with

the slorming and surrender of it lo Sir Valparaiso, bay of, 41.
John Hislop, 580, 1.

Vaughan's Sermon on' God the Doer of
Taylor's Calmet's dictionary of the holy all things,' 508, el seq. ; see Autinomi-

bible, 454, et seq. ; great improve anism.
meots in the present edition, 454, 5; Vera Cruz, description of il, 140, 1.
contents of the respective volumes,
456.

Wallace's memoirs of ladia, 528, et seq. ;
Jane, contributions of Q. Q. to see India.
a periodical work, &c. 432, el seq.; Ware's bints on extemporaneous preach-
probability of the lasting fame of ing, 282, et seq. ; extemporaneous
many modern writers for children, preaching distinguished from un pre-
ib.; unprecedented success of the meditated preaching, 282; preaching
poems, hymns, &c. written by the without premeditation a templation to in-
present author and her sister, &c. dolence, 283; evil consequent on the
432, 3; remarks on her pieces in the practice of reading sermons, 283, 4;
• associate minstrels,' ib.; Display, a language the iast thing the speclalor
tale, 434; essays in rhyme on morals should be anxious about, 284,5; extem-
and men, ib.; origin of the present poraneous speaking objected to only
papers, ib. ; their character, ib.; "the in the clerical profession, 285; au-
discontented pendulum,' 435, 6; moral,' thor's rules for acquiring a habit of erlem-
437; 'the philosophical scales,' 437, et poraneous preaching, ib.
seg. ; ' moral,' 439; how it strikes a Wars, British, in India, sketch of, 116,7.
stranger, ' 440, et seq. ; ' now and then,' Werninck's translatiou of sermons on
444, el seq.; on visiting Cow per's gar practical subjects, by soine eininent
den and summer-house at Olney, French and Dutch protestant minis-
446, 7.

ters in Holland, 154, el seq. ; the editor's
Testament, New, the books of it actually Temarks on the various authors, 179; deo

written by the Evangelists and the sign of an intended work on the history
Apostles, 210.

of the mental and moral development of

minkind, by Dr. Muntinghe, 179; sub.
jects of the collection, 181; illustra-
tive extracts from the different writers,

181, et seq.
White on the state of British India; see

India.
Widows, Hindoo, two saved from burn-

ing, by British interference, 66, 7.
Williams's dictionary of all religions and

religious denominations, &c. 380, et
seq; improvements of the present edi-

tion, 380, 1.
Wilson, the artist, Wright's life of, 498,

et seq.

Wolferstan's enchanted flute, and other

poems, and fables from la Fontaine,
543; the grasshopper und ant, 544;
town and country mouse, 544, 5; the
rats in council, 545, 6; the jug and
keltlı, 547, 8; two views of the same
subject, 548, et seq.

Eugenia, a poem, 543; ex-
tracls, 552.
Wolf's missionary journal, &c, 238, et

seq.; identity of the present race of
the Jews and Arabs with their early
ancestry, 238, 9; strong attachment
of the Jews to the land of their fathers,
239; little interest felt by Christian
nations towards the Jews, ib.; true
cause of the oppression exercised to-
wards the Jews, during seventeen cen-
turies, 240; inquiry into the truth of
the observation, that of all religions,
Judaism is the most rarely abjured,
241; the natural obstacles to the con-
version of the Jews greatly diminished,
ib.; the corruption of Christianity the
greatest obstacle of the present day to
their conversion, ib.; the Jewish po-
pulation chiefly resident in popish,
pagan, and Mahommedan countries,
242; author of the present work a
Jewish convert, 243 ; remarks on the
prejudice entertained against Jewish
converts, ib. ; character of Mr. Wolf,
ib. ; his early instruction in all the Jewish
ceremonies, 244 ; result of a conversation
with a Lutheran, when only eight years
old, 245; subsequent unsettled state of
his mind, and his entrance into the
Romish church, 245, 6; account of F.
Schlegel, 246, 7; slate of religion among
the papists of Hungary, 247; author's in-
teresting interview with Count Stolberg,
247, 8; detail of the circumstances
that attended his journey to Rome,
and during his residence there, ib.;
is dismissed by the pope and sent back
to Vienna, ib. ; his perplexed situation,
249; enters a popish convent, 249 ;

quits it and goes to London, 249, 50;
studies the oriental languages at Cem-
bridge, 250; sails to Palestine, ib.; his
conversation with a Jewish gentleman et
Gibraltar, 251, 2; his declaration of his
faith in the presence of several rabbies at
Grand Cairo, 254, 5; account of Mo-
hammed Effendi, 255; Mr. Wolf's
conversation with a Romish priest in e
Maronite convent on Mount Lebanon,
256, et seq.; his conversations with the
Jews at Jerusalem, 258, et seq. ; Rabbi
Mendel's gloss on Isaiah, 53-8, &c.
258, 9; state of the Jewish popula-
tion in rarious parts of the world,
260, 1; Polish Jews al Jerusalem, 261,
2; account of the Caraites, 262; the
Beni Khaibr, 262, 3; no Jews in Cyprus,
reason of it, 264 ; forther details of
Jewish population, general remarks on
the present state and prospects of the

Jews, 264, 5.
Worthington's, Hugh, sermons, 154, et

seq.
Wright's life of Richard Wilson, Esq.
" R. A. 498, et seq.; remarks on the
alleged neglected condition of the fine,
arts in England, 498; causes of the
prosperous state of painting, &c. in
Italy, 499; difference in respect to
England arising from climate, light,
internal construction of rooms, &c.,
ib.; great demand for the productions
of living artists when consonant with
Englisb habits, 499; instance in Mr.
Haydon, of great powers remaining
unrewarded, 500; the author's mise
conception of the success of Mr. Hil.
ton, ib. ; cause of the failure of his
Comus, ib.; superiority of the British
school over the continental artists,
501; comparative estimate of Bris
tish sculptors, 501, %; whimsical ec-
count of a German artist in ardent pursuit
of nature, 502 ; early life and studies of
Wilson, ib; cause of his attending to
landscape painting, 504; admirable libe-
Tality of a French artist, ib. ; further
account of Wilson, bis studies and
death, ib. ; his personal appearance,
504, 5; indiscretion of his biographer,
505 ; character of Wilson's powers as a
painter, 506; his poverty, 507; his
convivial habits, 508.

Xalapa, city of, 141; volcanic soil

around it, 142.

Zachariah, the prophet, Dr. Stonard's

commentary on his visions, 406, et
seg.

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