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mentioned in the Holy Scriptures. ment in question is unquestionably the same Our author and his companions gazed

which the females still wear appended to on these colossal vestiges with bewil. their noses, and has no resemblance either dered astonishment. The Abbé Mi. to a ring or a drop, but is a real button." chon was inclined to look upon them Damascus has been so often de. as antediluvian, an hypothesis in which scribed, that little can be added to De Saulcy is by no means disposed to what we already know. One of the coincide. On the 8th of March, they most ancient places in the world prereached Damascus. The outward as

sents scarcely any vestiges to interest pect of this far-famed city, the pearl the antiquary. But that many exist of the east, much disappointed them, under the ground of the modern city, but they were consoled by finding a and might be dis-interred by a series of superb hotel, with the most luxurious

diggings on an extensive scale, is a accommodation. The houses of Da.

question which can scarcely be dismascus are generally built of mud and

puted, although the undertaking is so plaster, and out of repair. The Turks difficult as to be impracticable at the seldom attempt to arrest the encroach

present moment. A few years more ments of time, who thus operates as may effect wonders in this quarter. their most persevering enemy. Until Baalbek detained De Saulcy and his a very recent date, all Christians were

party, for three days. They would compelled to alight and cross the gate willingly have remained a month, had of Damascus on foot, but this bumi.

their arrangements permitted. The liating regulation no longer exists,

account of these magnificent ruins is baving been abolished since 1850, by one of the most attractive passages in the energetic interference of M. De the book. And here again several Ségur Duperron, the French consul.

errors in the descriptions of earlier The ladies of Damascus are represented travellers are carefully noted and coras being exceedingly bandsome, but rected. The size of some of the disfigured by ungraceful decorations,

stones employed in the Temples of Juand a most defective style of costume. piter and the Sun, and the power The following passage indicates a by which they were raised to their strange and primitive fashion, still position, exceeds all that we can imauniversal amongst the female natives, gine of mechanical process, and leave and which shows itself everywhere as us utterly unable to calculate how such you approach the city :

miracles of architecture can have been

effected in remote periods. “ This fashion is by no means a new one,

On the 20th of March, the entersince it can be traced back to the most re- prising French travellers arrived at mote antiquity; I mean a small gold button, Beyrout without accident, after an aboften ornamented with a turquoise, and sence of three months, thus closing a which females insert into their nostrils, in

most perilous and difficult expedition imitation of a shirt-button. We learn some

with triumphant success, and contri. thing on this subject from the Bible, when Abraham's servant was sent into Mesopota

buting to our geographical and histomia, to seek a wife for Isaac, the son of his

rical knowledge a series of discoveries master. Coben translates the passage as

equal in importance and extent to any follows: 'I then put a ring to her face, and

which human intelligence and persebracelets to her hands. The Hebrew text verance have accomplished since Cosays literally, "I put the nezem to her nose, lumbus passed the Atlantic Ocean, and and the bracelets to ber hands.' This word added a new and boundless field for nezem has been translated by Mendelsohn, the exercise of human energy. M. de nose-bob, although the Septuagint had ren- Saulcy has done much, where little was dered it ear-drops. In the 22nd verse of the

previously known, and declares that same chapter it is said, “And it came to

he has left still more to be accompass, as the camels had done drinking, that

plished by others, whose emulation the man took a golden ear-ring of half a shekel weight, and two bracelets for her

may be excited by a very encouraging hands of teu shekels weight of gold.' The

example. The short synopsis we have Samaritan text, after the mention of the

been enabled to give, will afford the first ornament, adds, and he put it to her reader but an inadequate idea of the nose.' Any traveller who has passed through information and amusement he will the villages in the neighbourhood of Damas- surely extract from the perusal of cus and Baalbek, can have no doubt as to these extraordinary volumes. the meaning of these two verses ; the orna

J. W. C.

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THE LEAVES OF OCTOBER. TRE FLOWERS OF THE TROPICS, BY D. F. M CAR

TUY-09 TRE DEATH OF GENERAL SIR CHARLES NAPIER, BY W. ALLINGHAM
DOMINICK'S CAVE-THE FALSE ONK-SPARTACUS-IN MEMORIAN : ANGELS' FOOT.
STEP-SORROW ON THE SEA

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383

IRISH RIVERS -- No. X. TUB TOLKA

391

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF B. R. HAYDOX-GUIZOT ON THE FINE ARTS

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FRANCE, PAST AND PRESENT: A FEW DESULTOUY NOTES ON PARIS, IT! A

GLANCE AT WILAT WAS DOING THERE IN AUGUST LAST, AND THOUGHTS ON MANY

CHANGES
LIVES OF THE LAUREATES
SIR JASPER CAREW, KNT. CUAPTER XXXI.-HAVRE. CHAPTER XXXII.-MY

REWARD. CHAPTER XXXIII.-A GLIMPSE OF A NEW PATU
THE DREAM OF RAVAN.--A MYSTERY
ON THE SITE OF THE DESTROYED CITIES OF THE PLAIN, BY G. S. FABER, B.D.
A NIGHT WITH TUE MYSTICS. BY JONATHAN FREKB SLINGSBY

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DUBLIN JAMES M'GLASHAN, 50 UPPER SACKVILLE-STREET.

WM. S. ORR AND CO., LONDON AND LIVERPOOL.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

The Editor of The Dublin UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE begs to notify that he will not undertake to return, or be accountable for, any manuscripts forwarded to him for perusal.

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nished copper.

The radiant mornings, the glowing noons, the gorgeous sunsets, are all gone. Gone, too, is the sweet breath of early autumn, that set the green leaves a-trem. bling, but shook them not down from the sprays. And now come the grey mornings, cold and fresh ; and the clouds are denser, and more frequent by day; and the evenings fade away through a shorter twilight into the night that is chill with the hoar-frost. The breezes, too, forget their gentleness, and grow wild and gusty, rending away the leaves from the boughs, whirling them through the air, and scattering them along the earth. The beautiful leaves! How they have changed “from glory to glory," from their prime in summer to their de. cadence in autumn, as the features of the early-dying grow pure with a lus. trous beauty, beneath the touch of disease! See how yon beech glows, like bur.

What a pallid, sickly yellow is spreading over the ash leaf. Look at the russet livery of the oak - the pale silver of the birchấthe brilliant yellow and the deep brown with which the nipping frost and the chill wind have painted here and there the foliage of the forest. Yes, the leaves have fulfilled their mission of beauty, and now fall away, as the hoary locks fall from the head of age. Well, be it so. Thank heaven! man lives not upon the loveliness of external nature alone; and when that fades, he can turn to the charms of things spiritual and intellectual, that are as bright and blooming in winter as in summer. Come, let us see if we have not some such pleasures at hand for you, dear readers, to win you from thoughts of sadness, if, indeed, nature suggests such thoughts to you. Is there not a spiritual wind that breathes and blows over human souls, first awakening, then stimulating and next ripening the fancy and the genius and the intellect?--and then, at last, that “ wind of the Spirit "sweeps the soul with a more impetuous gust; and the matured thought, like the matured leaf, is severed from its pirent, and cast abroad to the world - but oh! not like the leaf, to wither and die and be forgotten. No; it remains ever fragrant, unfading, incorruptible, like those flowers which botanists tell us never perish. Here, then, are a few leaves out of many which have fallen rise to our hand, and we commit them to that giant spirit of civilisation, which “bloweth where it listeth," and penetrates all regions of the earth — the spirit of the PrintingPress. Something we bave culled to please every taste, to appeal to the intellect, or the fancy, or the heart:

I.

TIE FLOWERS OF THE TROPICS.

BY DENIS FLORENCE M'CARTHY.

* C'est ainsi qu'elle a mis, entre les tropiques, la plupart des fleurs apparentes sur des arbres. J'y en ai vu bien peu dans les prairies, mais beaucoup dans les forets. Dans ces pays, il faut lever les yeux en haut pour y voir des fleurs; dans le notre, il faut les baisser à terre."-SAINT PIERRE. Etudes de la Nature.

In the soft sunny regions that circle the waist

Of the globe with a girdle of topaz and gold,
Which heave with the throbbings of life where they're placed,

And glow with the fire of the heart they enfold :
VOL. XLII.--NO. CCL.

2 D

Where to live, where to breathe, seems a paradise-dream

A dream of some world more elysian than this Where if death and if sin were away, it would seem

Not the foretaste alone, but the fulness of bliss. Where all that can gladden the sense or the sight

Fresh fruitage as cool and as crimson as EvenWhere the richness and rankness of nature unite

To build the frail walls of the Sybarite's heaven. But oh! should the heart feel the desolate dearth

Of some purer enjoyment to speed the bright hours, In vain through the leafy luxuriance of earth

Looks the languid-lit eye for the freshness of flowers. No, its glance must be turned from the earth to the sky

From the clay-rooted grass to the heaven-branching trees And there, oh I enchantment for soul and for eye,

Hang blossoms so pure that an angel might seize : Thus, when pleasure begins from its

sweetness to cloy, And the warm heart grows rauk like a soil over-ripe, We must turn from the earth for some promise of joy,

And look up to Heaven for a hclier type.
In the climes of the north, which alternately shine-

Now warm with the sunshine, now white with the snow-
And which, like the breast of the earth they entwine,

Grow chill with its chilness, or glow with its glow. In those climes where the soul on more vigorous wing

Rises soaring to Heaven in its rapturous flight, And led ever on by the radiance they fling,

Tracketh star after star through infinitude's night. How oft doth the seer, from his watch-tower on high,

Scan the depths of the heavens with his wonderful glass, And, like Noah of old, when earth's creatures went by,

Name the orbs and the sun-lighted spheres as they pass ! Ilow often, when drooping, and weary, and worn,

With fire-thrubbing temples and star-dazzled eyes, Does he turn from his glass at the breaking of morn,

And exchanges for flowers all the wealth of the skies ! Ah ! thus should we minule the far and the near,

And while striving to pierce what the Godhead conceals,
From the far heights of science look down with a fear

To the lowliest truths the same Godhead reveals.
When the rich fruit of joy glads the heart and the mouth,

Or the bold wing of thought leads the daring soul forth,
Let us pause and look up as for Flowers of the South-

Let us humbly look down as for Flowers of the North.

II.

ON THE DEATH OF GENERAL SIR CHARLES NAPIER.

Would War were clead !

Yet when a warrior dies Like this one, to his knell a pulse reboundsOur world is poorer by a noble man. Napier is hush’dl—fierce conqueror of Scinde And righteous ruler. Through a sickly frame, Shatter'd with war, the spiritual fire Blazed torchlike on the battle's vanward surge ; And over great submissive monarchies Shone steady and benign. From east to west All true men hail'd the heroic fulgency

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