Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.

“GRIP '' prevails in several of the cities. There appear to be many cases, but of a mild character, in Philadelphia. In New York, on the 19th inst., the Board of Health declared it epidemic. - —Sir William Jenner, the distinguished English pathologist, “ physician in ordinary '' to the queen and the Prince of Wales, died on the 19th inst. He was born in 1815, and was president of the Royal College of Physicians from 1881 to 1889, when he retired from the practice of his profession. He was the first to establish beyond dispute the difference in kind between typhus and typhoid fever.

—One of the first acts of the incoming Republican Administration of Kansas is expected to be the removal of the presi- dent of the Kansas State Agricultural College, and the weeding out from among the faculty of such professors as are supposed to be tainted with “populism,” so a current item Says.

—A meeting of representatives of the three leading milling concerns of Minneapolis—the Pillsbury-Washburn Flour Mills Company, the Northwestern Consolidated Company, and the Washburn-Crosby Company—has resulted in a unanimous decision that none of the Minneapolis properties should go into the consolidation or combination, known as ‘‘the McIntyre scheme.” It is supposed the mills at Milwaukee and Duluth will follow this lead.

—Women are to be dropped from the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Company after January 1. All who have not served over two years will have to go. This affects about 200 clerks and stenographers along the entire system. The trouble, it is explained, is not that the women are inefficient, but that their employment narrows the field for securing good men from the lower ranks.

—Baron Ferdinand James Rothschild, the English head of the great money house, died on the 17th inst.

—Edward G. Mason, a prominent lawyer of Chicago, died last week. He leaves thirteen children. He was a member of the Corporation of Yale University, and very devoted to the

institution ; three of his sons had graduated from it, three are

studying there, and four are preparing to enter.

—The officials of the Paris Exposition have selected as the

site of the proposed Lafayette monument a square in the

Louvre Garden, just behind the Gambetta monument, a spot which was originally designed for a monument to Napoleon I. Hereafter it will be called Lafayette Square.

—The Longfellow National Memorial Association has been formed for the purpose of erecting a statue of Longfellow in the city of Washington. The President of the Association is Chief-Justice Fuller, with Senator Hoar as Vice-President and Gen. Greely as Secretary.

—The Rome correspondent of a London paper says : “In response to the Vatican's inquiry on the subject, President McKinley has sent an assurance that the Catholics in Cuba and the Philippines will enjoy the same ample liberty as the Catholics in America.”

—The American Commissioners who negotiated the socalled Peace Treaty at Paris sailed from Southampton, England, on the 17th inst., for New York. They bring their copy of the treaty with them.

—Circuit Judge Wood, of St. Louis, has ruled “that the common law that gave the husband absolute right over the personal estate of his wife has ceased to exist.”

—The Santa Fe Railroad is about to establish a new transpacific line of steamers, the first vessel to sail from Yokohama, January 3, for San Diego via Honolulu.

—Frank Knaak, of New York, has been acquitted in Berlin of the charge of lese majeste in referring to Emperor William as a blockhead, because, it appears, he was intoxicated when he committed the offense.

NOTICES.

*...* Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting's Committee to visit the smaller branches, as way may open, will attend meetings as follows: F1RST MONTH, 1899: 5. Merion 8. Germantown. 24. I7th street and Girard Avenue. 29. Reading. AQUILA J LINVILL, Clerk.

*** The United First-day evening meetings (Philadelphia), will be held during Twelfth month at Race above I5th street, at 7.30 o'clock. Members of the various meetings are solicited to attend, and invite strangers to accompany them.

[blocks in formation]

Friends' Academy,

T.OCUST VALLEY, LONG ISLAND.

A Boarding and Day School for Boys and Girls, under the care of Friends.

Thorough instruction to fit for business or to enter college. Board and tuition $150 per school year. New Building with modern conveniences.

For particulars, .#.

PRINCIPAL FRIENDS' ACADEMY,
- Locust Valley, Long lsland, N. Y.

Chelten Hills School,
FOR BOARDING AND DAY PUPILS,

will re-open September 21st, 1898, (17th year). College

preparation. For circulars apply to the Principals. - * * * ANNIE HEACOCK.

LIDA. R. LEMAISTRE.

Wyncote, Pennsylvania.

George School,

NEAR NEWTOWN, BUCKS COUNTY, PA.
Under the care of Philadelphia Yearly
Meeting of Friends.
Course of study extended and thorough, preparing
students either for business or for College.
For catalogue, apply to
GEORGE L. MARIS, Principal,

Chappaqua Mountain Institute,

A FRIENDs’ BoAR DING SCHool for
Boys AND GIRLs.

The building is modern, and the location is the hill
country thirty-two miles north of New York City.
For Circulars, address
CHAPPAQUA MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE,
Chappaqua, New York.

Abington Friends’ School,

Swarthmore College,

SWARTHMORE, PENNA.

WM. W. BIRDSALL, President.

Under care of Friends. Send sor Catalogue.

Triends' Central School,
FIFTEENTH AND RACE STS.,
PHILADELPHIA.

Under care of the Monthly Meetings of Philadelphia;

furnishes a #otical, guarded education, and £refares /or college.

OSEPH S. WALTON, \ , , ..., João słośćMAN, ; Principals.

Circulars on application.

AK GROVE SEMINARY
AND BAILEY INSTITUTE.

A Boarding and Day School for both sexes, under the

THE churches of the United States have taken 1,600 Chinese into membership.

George School, Penna.

For BoARDING AND DAY PUPILs of Both Sexes.
Near Jenkintown, Penna., Io miles from Philadelphia.

Under the care of Abington Monthly Meeting. Liberal

course of study. Students prepared for college or busi

ness. The home-like surroundings make it especially

attractive to boarding pupils. Students admitted when-
ever there are vacancies. Send for circulars to
LOUIS B. AMBLER, Principal,

Or Jenkintown, Pa.

CYNTHIA G. BOSLER, Sec'y, Ogontz, Pa.

charge of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends.
Primary Department for children. Commercial Depart-
ment. Exceptional facilities in Music, Painting, and
Drawing. Prepares for college. Winter term begins
December 6th. Spring term begins March 7th.
For Catalogue address,
PRINCIPAL OAK GROVE SEM.INARY,
Vassalboro, Maine

Miss Wool

(Formerly SwartRMoRE GRAMMAR ScHool.)

New stone buildings; cottage plan; light, heat, venti

lation, and drainage the best; combined advantages of

individual attention and class enthusiasm.
For circulars address

ARTHUR H. TOMLINSON, Principal,

Swarthmore, Pa.

GEORGE B. cock, Telephone :-42 as D.
LAW - -
CoNVENTION }-STENOGRAPHER.
Science .
14 South Broad Street, Philadelphia. &
Residence, 216 W. Coulter Street, Germantown.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

IN old times they had some odd titles for religious books. Here are a few : “A Rusty Saw, for the throat of the Pope.” “A Slice of Bread and a piece of meat, spiritually administered for the nourishment of hungry souls.” “A sharp Knife, for ripping open the pillows under the arm holes of sinners—for the first time whetted and ground on the grindstone of the Evangelists.” “A new Wheelbarrow, for wheeling away the burden of corruption from the church.” “A Rush Light, to assist the true believer in understanding the 5th verse of the 9th chapter of St. Luke.” “A Handful of Moss, gathered from the Stone which the builders rejected.” “A Telescope, by looking through which, the humble Christian may see over the battlements of Heaven.’’

[merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Petticoats

A Garment that is Peerless at the Price.

We offer to send Petticoats as pictured here to any who may desire them,

At $1. oo each,

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

LETTERS FROM ISAAC WILSON.—I, . 959
Two FRIENDs, . . & © to go e o . 960
FROM A FRIEND IN Connecticut, . . . 960
A VOICE FROM CALIFORNIA, . . . . . . 960
A POEM BY WHITTIER, . . . . . . . . 960
NOTE FROM DANIEL GRIEST, . . . . 961
FRIENDS of THE “INTELLIGENCER,” 961
CURRENT LITERATURE, . . . . . . 962
CONFERENCEs, ASSOCIATIONs, ETC., 962
EDUCATIONAL NOTES, . . . . . . . 963
COMMUNICATIONS:
Commendation of an Article, . . & 963
THE “CHRISTIAN COMMONweALTH,” 964
MISCELLANY: “Barrels” for Mt. Pleas.
ant; The School Board of Boston;
Women and Social Questions, . . . 965
CURRENT EVENTs, . . . . . . . . . . 965

News AND OTHER GLEANINGs, . . . . . 965 NoTICES, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 966

$marthmore College jellowships and Štholarships.
* -

FELLOWSHIPS

THE Joshua LIPPINCOTT FELLOWSHIP, founded by Howard W. Lippincott, A. B., of the Class of 1875, in memory of his fathé, consists of a fund yielding an income of $450 per year, which is granted annually by the Faculty, with the concurrence of the Instruction Committee, to a graduate of the College to

enable him to pursue advanced study under the

direction or with the approval of the Faculty.

THE LUCRETIA MoTT FELLOWSHIP, founded by the Somerville Literary Society and sustained by the contributions of its members, yields an annual income of $525, and is awarded each year by a Committee of the Faculty selected by the Society, to a young woman graduate of that year, for the purpose of pursuing advanced study at some other institution approved by this Committee.

SCHOLARSHIPS

1. THE WESTBURY QUARTERLY MEETING, N. Y., SchoLARSHIP pays all charges for board and tuition. It is awarded annually by a Committee of the Quarterly Meeting.

2. THE REBECCA M. ATKINSON SCHOLARSHIP AND THE BARCLAY G. ATKINSON SCHOLARSHIP each pay all charges for board and tuition. They are awarded annually by the Board of Managers of the College.

3. There are nine other similar Scholarships owned by individuals, each entitling the holder to board and tuition at the College. These are awarded by the owners.

4. I. V. WILLIAMSON SCHOLARSHIPS FOR PREPARATORY SCHOOLS:

For the year 1899-1900 fifteen honor scholarships of the value of $150 each for students resident within the College, and $75 each for non-resident students (i. e. attending the College, but not boarding thereat), will be offered to members of the graduating classes of 1899 of the following-named schools upon the conditions mentioned below :

1 to Friends' High School, . . .

2 to Friends’ Central School, . . . Philadelphia, Pa. . . . . . . New York, N. Y. . Baltimore. Md.

1 to Friends' Seminary,

I to Friends’ School, . . . . . . . Wilmington, Del. 1 to Friends’ High School. . . . . Moorestown, N. J. I to Friends’ Academy, . . . . . Locust Valley, N. Y.

r to Friends’ Select School, . , Washington, D.C. 1 to Abington Friends’ School, . . Jenkintown, Pa.

2 to George School, George School, Pa.

I to Chappaqua Mountain Institute, Chappaqua, N.Y.

I to Swarthmore Preparatory Sch’l, Swarthmore, Pa.
I to Swarthmore Public High Sch’l, Swarthmore, Pa.
I to Martin Academy, Kennett Sq’r., Pa.

These scholarships will be awarded upon competitive examination under the direction of the College Faculty. None will be awarded to applicants who fail to be admitted without condition to the Freshman Class, and every holder of such scholarship must pursue in College the studies of one of the regular courses.

5. For the year 1899-1900 three honor scholarships are offered for work in the College as follows:

THE DEBORAH FISHER WHARTON SCHOLAR" SHIP : To that member of the Junior Class of I898–99 who, on promotion without condition to the Senior Class, shall have passed the best examinations on the regular work of the year. $200, if resident; $100, if non-resident.

THE SAMUEL J. UNDERHILL SCHOLARSHIP :

To that member of the Sophomore Class of

1898-99 who, on promotion without condition to the Junior Class, shall have passed the best examinations on the regular work of the year. $2OO, if resident; $100, if non-resident.

THE ANSON LAPHAM SCHOLARSHIP : To that member of the Freshman Class of 1898-99 who, on promotion without condition to the Sophomore Class, shall have passed the best examinations on the regular work of the year. $2OO, if resident; $100, if non-resident.

If, in any year, any of the Scholarships under 4 and 5 are not awarded, the funds thus released will be applied to increase the number of Scholarships available under the following:

6. For the benefit of students needing pecuniary aid, whose previous work has demonstrated their earnestness and their ability, the following are offered. They will be awarded at the discretion of the Committee on Trusts, Endowments, and Scholarships. About one-fourth of them will be available for new students for the year 1899-1900. Application for these should be made to the President. THE SAMUEL WILLETS Scholars HIPS : Sixteen scholarships of $150 and ten scholarships of $100 per year. THE ISAAC STEPHENS SCHOLARSHIPs: Four scholarships of $50 per year. THE MARY WOOD SCHOLARSHIPS : Two scholarships of $50 per year.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

ion, or governess. Box 96, Kennett Square, Pa.

Friends’ family. One block from street cars passing

A COMPETENT HOUSEKEEPER DESIRES railroad stations, Capitol, and public buildings. Terms,

position. Capable of overseeing servants, and tak- 1.5o a day. Address FRIEND, 1626 Nineteenth ing full charge of house. Box 143, Langhorne, Pa. treet, N. W., Washington, D. C.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[graphic]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »