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burdens, why should we bend our free shoulders to the conduct of their civil and political affairs." I take on the heavy load? Of all the ironies of his- cannot see why any person of just and honorable tory, it is one of the most melancholy and unique mind should flout this attitude and purpose as that at a moment when the Czar of all the Russias, utterly irrational. It is indifferent to the philosophy countries semi-barbarous, is pleading for a general of what might have been, which is never very fruitful disarmament, we of America, who, in the century of results. It starts from where we are.

By whatand a quarter since we declared our independence, ever crookedness we got there, with whatever failure have had more than 100 years of peace, should now to redeem our promises, we are here with these varibe panting to 'cry havoc, and let slip the dogs of ous possessions actually or potentially in our hands. war.' Have we found war so beautiful a thing in “How can we,” it is asked “permit these gardens of these last months that we have become enamored of the world to revert into the rapacious and oppressive it ?

If our greater America does not mean frequent charge of a nation which has never done anything war it must mean costly military occupation; costly but abuse its opportunities from the time of Christoin human life as well as in silver and gold. Thous-pher Columbus until now?” ands of our young men, without the inspiration of I answer, that if we are to hold these conquered that great humanitarian impulse which swept them lands in any way whatever it must be in some such into the ranks six months ago, will have to go forth high, unselfish way as this. If we should attempt to to these new possessions, to intellectually and morally hold them for mere commercial exploitation, as some decay, to suffer and to die, after the manner of all would have us do, the civilization of the world would temperate zone people attempting to develop tropical | shrivel from us like a snake skin and cast us out as a countries.. No! No! We may appreciate all the polluted thing. Colonization in any sincere and courage and all the patience and long suffering of genuine meaning of the word is an impossibility. our soldiers and our sailors at their several posts of But has this humanitarian dream reckoned sufficiently duty and danger, but those of us who had forgotten with the concrete facts of our American political that 'war is hell' have learned anew our lesson, and life? Has it considered whether we have a body of those who had no experience of it have now had civil servants equal to the discharge of such duties enough. We shall not subvert our traditional policy as would be laid upon them? It is certain that we just for the sake of being one of the great fighting have not. Here would be the potentiality of going nations of the earth. It may be some time yet before wrong beyond the dreams of any of the bosses who " The war-drums throb no longer,

are now riding us with whip and spur. Here would And the battle-flags are furled

be unlimited opportunities for such devil's work as we In the parliament of man,

have had in the administration of our military departThe federation of the world ;

ments of transportation and medicine and general but hereafter, if I am not much mistaken, we shall supply. The proposed government of these dependinvoke the dread arbitrament of war more seriously encies would be particularly sensitive to Congresthan in this event; we shall be more absolutely sure

sional control, and that means the distribution of that it will be worth the cost, and that there is no

places with little or no regard to personal fitness. other way, before we wade into the rushing stream

Given such a management of Cuba and the Philipof mingled blood and tears.

pines as we have had of the War Department during And now I come, too late, perhaps, to a concep

the last six months and the last state of those territion of a Greater America, which is attractive to many tories would be worse than the first. And why has of our most generous spirits. Such do not care for

Such do not care for the management of the War Department been so any swelling of our physical bulk, for any increment intolerably bad ? Simply because it has been conducted of our population. Nor do they care to have

on the basis of Congressional politics, the place for America shine as a great military and naval power, him who has a "pull," who is somebody's brother or having some notion what that means in the

way

of monstrous burdens and

son or nephew or local adept in working “blocks of burdens and miserable complications. five” and things of that kind. But we are told that Nor does the commercial argument appeal to them, England has a body of civil servants in India and especially when the possible advantages of colonial Egypt and in her crown colonies that is equal to its markets are weighed against the certain incidents of tasks, and we are also told that it is unpatriotic to for miscarriage and corruption that would in here in the

a moment doubt that we can do as well. I do not new order of affairs. But these generous spirits say

But these generous spirits say question the average moral quality of the American --and I must confess that there is something in their people. But our government is not representative. I views that should appeal to every humane person

mean our governing bodies do not represent the that such a great nation as America ought to take its homely virtues of our people. This is a stage of our part in civilizing and elevating the inferior races of the development which we shall work through in time. world ; that we ought not to leave all this hard and

As for England, she has waded through corruption to disagreeable business to other nations, however will

her present coign of vantage. She has got knowling they may be to take it off our hands.

“Be the edge by experience. We, too, have made a good cost ten times, a hundred times, the gain, to the beginning. We have had plenty of experience. But nation or to the individuals, we will do all that we

untried conditions would afford a fearful opportunity can to make these people happy, industrious, useful for the old vice to breed again after its kind. Where self-respecting men and women, and in proportion to

the carcass was there would the vultures be gathered their intelligence and capacity, will admit them to

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Again, in our dealings, heretofore with inferior

Poison Ivy. races there is absolutely nothing to encourage us. DURING the recent field-day of the Darlington Botanical Club, . Our dealings with the Indians have been equivalent of West Chester, Pa., one of the interesting side talks by Dr. to a “ Century of Dishonor.” And how about the Schmucker of the State Normal School related to poison ivy. blacks ? Does our disfranchisement of them by one

For a long time, he said, scientists could not decide what is

the active principle of the plant. After much study and contemptible artifice or another promise well for our

investigation it was found that the substance which causes the treatment of the natives and half breeds of our new

inflammation and swelling is a non-volatile oil, not soluble in possessions ? We have been credibly assured that water, but easily dissolved in alcohol. Therefore, if a person the negroes of Cuba are used to better treatment than bathe the affected parts in alcohol as soon as he finds that he those of Georgia and Louisiana. Was our Southern

has been poisoned no further harm or inconvenience need be

feared. reconstruction such that we can enter on a much harder field with hope of good success ?"

Parted in the Middle. The speaker closed by reverting to the threatened

An amusing incident occurred a few days since at the Lenox change in our traditional policy, and said the realiza

home of a Boston family, says Harper's Round Table. They tion of the hopes for new territory would be difficult

had urged some friends who were driving through the Berkbecause of the new policy in which the nation is in- shires to stop with them to lunch. This they were finally volved. Bigger armies and navies, he said, were in- persuaded to do, a little girl three years old being of the evitable, if such a policy were to be adopted, so add- party. Soon after they were all seated at the table, Mr. ing new burdens to industry or by adding to our

Ultradude, a guest in the house (a man of curling locks parted present area territories that will

remain essentially which chanced to be just opposite the high chair occupied by

in the middle), appeared, and took his accustomed seat, foreign for centuries to come. There must be, he Ethel. The child, after a glance or two at the new-comer, said, men of high character chosen for the new places, began to show symptoms of weeping, and a moment or two men of sincere convictions, consistent lives, indisputa- afterward burst into such a flood of tears that she had to by ble integrity. He believed, however, that all will yet position, and so little of the cry-baby about her, that her

taken from the room. Ethel has so bright and sunny a disbe well.

mother felt justified in hastening after the nurse and child to

know the cause of so unexpected an outbreak. When the The City Hall Clock.

little one could command her voice, she managed to confide THE great City Hall clock, of Philadelphia, is intended to to her mother between her sobs, “I's so 'fraid of that boy commence marking time with the new year, 1899, or at with a girl's head !" midnight of next Twelfth month, 31st. Its dials, three hundred and seventy feet above the pavement, are twenty-two

CURRENT EVENTS. feet in diameter. A man standing on IX of the dial shows his head just above X. The dials are of glass, in order by The Peace Commissioners have continued their negotiations electric light illumination with one hundred and fifty lamps

at Paris, and while there is no official announcement of the to show the time by night, as well as by day. The minute- matters discussed, it seems to be fairly plain that up to this hand is ten feet eight inches long, the hour-hand nine feet. writing the Philippine Islands question has not been reached. Both hands together weigh four hundred pounds.

Com- There have been, it is said, sharp differences concerning Cuba, pressed air will be used to move them. It is said that the the Spaniards urging that the United States assume the debt great town clock in Westminster Abbey, which is not quite so of the island, or part of it. A Paris dispatch, on the 17th large as the City Hall clock, requires the services of two men inst., says that the American commissioners“ rejected the four days to wind it. "That clock strikes the hours, but this idea of accepting sovereignty over Cuba for the United clock will not strike."

States," and that the power of the latter would be used only

to restore order and establish government. To this the The War-Tax “Stamps."

Spanish rejoined that the exercise of such authority was

sovereignty. The merchant pays the bulk of the war tax, the Farm Inplement News says, and adds : “ He telegraphs for certain goods and stamps the message

The evacuation of Porto Rico by the Spanish was exto the tune of one cent. He is sure the freight bill includes

pected to be completed by the 18th inst., and the American

flag to be formally raised at San Juan. In Cuba, the removal the tax that the railroad company pays on the bill of lading.

of the Spanish troops makes slow progress. Parrado, one of Maybe it does not, but he thinks so and that is almost as

the Spanish commissioners in conference with the American distressing. He sells the goods to a customer and takes a

commissioners at Havana, is quoted as saying that Spain had note secured by mortgage. Of course the customer has no

sought transport ships to remove her men, in all ports of revenue stamps, so the merchant decorates the note to the

or If our moveEurope, but was too poor to secure them.

The acknowledgment of extent of two cents a hundred.

ments are too slow," he said, “you will have to put us out. the mortgagor's signature calls for a ten-cent stamp. Shall

It is suggested as likely that the United States will have to he ask the poor notary, who only gets a pittance per acknowl

provide transportation. edgment, to pay this? If the mortgage is more than $1,000 it requires a twenty-five-cent stamp, and of course the merchant must furnish that.

A FRIGHTFUL marine accident occurred on the south “ After awhile the bill comes due. He is a little short of coast of England, on the evening of the 14th instant. The funds and gets a loan at the bank. He gives his note and

steamship Mohegan, of the Atlantic Transport line, ran stamps it at the rate of two cents for each hundred dollars. upon the rocks off the Lizard, about 7 p. m., and shortly

sank. The banker cannot afford to pay it, he says. Then a check

It is

She was bound from London for New York. is sent to the shipper and the merchant stamps that. Event

believed that 108 persons were drowned and only fifty saved. ually the customer's .note matures and he must have a re

It is not explained how the ship was so far out of a safe newal. This calls for more stamps for the new note and mortgage. Perhaps when his own note at the bank is due he must have an extension. If so, he stamps the renewal and The War Investigating Commission left Washington on the check he gives for the interest. By this time he gets im- the 16th, to inspect all Southern camps. Testimony of officers patient and stamps his foot. Then he wonders why he ever will be taken. Orders for the movement of General Graham's wanted his country to go to war."

course.

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corps from Camp Meade, near Harrisburg, Pa., to camps in : the South, have been revoked, owing to the prevalence of yellow fever at Southern points, and the soldiers will remain until cold weather arrives.

EMPEROR William of Germany left Berlin last week on his way to Constantinople and Jerusalem. In the latter city he will take part in the ceremony of dedicating a Protestant German church. It was reported that an Anarchist plot had been formed to assassinate him, while on the way, and numerous arrests were made. The Emperor is accompanied by the Empress and a number of officials. They reached Venice on the 13th inst., and proceeded the same day for Constantinople.

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THE strikes in Paris appear to have subsided, and a dispatch on the 17th says the troops have been withdrawn from the yards and other places in which they have been stationed since disturbances were threatened. The agitation of the Dreyfus matter is less acute, but as the Chambers are about to resume their sessions soon, it must again revive. It seems doubtful whether there will be any "revision” of the trial, after all, and whether the Premier, M. Brisson, attempting to secure it will not cause his Ministry to “fall" by vote of the Chamber of Deputies.

NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.
The annual report of the United States Indian school at
Carlisle, just prepared by Major (no longer Captain) Pratt,
shows that there are 462 boys and 405 girls in the school,
representing seventy-four tribes. During the year 1,080 have
been on the roll. The number now in the school is 104 in
excess of last year.

--The satisfactory announcement is made that several of
the largest railroad companies in the country are planning to
move for a reduction in sleeping-car rates. It is proposed to
have all the roads in the country using Pullman cars unite in
an appeal to this company to make a reduction in the rates
charged for upper and lower berths in sleeping cars, and in
the rates for seats in chair cars. The enormous profits of the
Pullman Company, recently disclosed, will no doubt promote
this movement.

-By an extraordinary manifestation of energy, the Powers" that remain in “concert" in relation to Crete, are compelling the entire withdrawal of the Turkish troops from that island. The Turkish officials, by their usual twisting and delaying, have endeavored to avoid it, but this time the Powers seem in earnest.

-At the Pennsylvania State Convention of the W. C. T. U., at Reading, on the 17th inst., Rebecca B. Chambers, of West Grove, was reëlected President. Resolutions that were adopted provide, among other things, for the petitioning of the Legislature to prohibit the custom of treating in saloons.

- The Spanish civil courts within the Philippine territory have resumed the exercise of their jurisdiction, subject to the supervision of the American Military Government, which reserves the exclusive right to exercise criminal jurisdiction.

-Pittsburg is to have a new Union railway station. It is to cost $1,645,000, and will be very like the Jersey City and Philadelphia stations of the Pennsylvania road, which is to build the structure. It was badly needed.

-Bishop Hartzell, of the Methodist Episcopal Church in
Africa, who has been in Pittsburg, says he is commissioned to
ask the protection of the United States for the negro republic
of Liberia.

-The degree of Doctor of Laws has been conferred upon
President McKinley by the University of Chicago.

-Edwin Clawston, the owner of an ostrich farm in South
Pasadena, Cal., has succeeded in hatching ostrich eggs with
an incubator. The process takes forty days.

TERRIBLE riots occurred at Virden, Illinois, on the 12th instant. A train load of imported” negroes arrived to take the places of the striking coal miners, and this caused a battle between the Sheriff's deputies and the strikers. Thirteen men were killed and twenty-five wounded. Governor Tanner sent troops to the scene, instructing them to quell the riot and protect life and property, but not to allow any importation of negroes.

He has freely expressed the opinion that the mine owners are responsible for the blood shed, and they declare him responsible.

The political “campaigns.'' in Pennsylvania and New York continue very earnest and animated. In the former John Wanamaker began an extended speaking tour on the 17th instant, and the three candidates for governor, Stone Rep., Jenks, Dem., and Swallow, Ind., are all speaking daily. The result seems uncertain ; there is no denial that a very large shift of voters has been made to Swallow, and those in charge of his campaign are confident of his election. In New York, Roosevelt, Rep., and Van Wyck, Dem., it is believed will have a close contest.

NOTICES.

* * New York. Yearly Meeting's Visiting *** The Committee appointed by the New * A Conference under the care of the the following meetings in Tenth month : Committee expects some of its members to visit York Yearly Meeting Educational Committee in

the interest of Swarthmore College will hold a Philanthropic Committee of the Yearly and

23. Poughkeepsie.

meeting at Flushing, L. I., Tenth month 29, Quarterly Meeting will be held in the meeting

30. Flushing.

at 2.30 o'clock, p. m. All Friends interested house at Solebury, Bucks county, Pa., on First

JOSEPH T. MCDOWELL, Clerk. in the College are invited to attend. day, Tenth month 30, 1898, at 2.30 p. m.

ALBERT A. MERRITT, Clerk. Subject, “ Peace and Arbitration." All inter

*** The Committee on Philanthropic Labor ested are respectfully invited to attend. On of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends will

* * A Conference under the care of Philadelbehalf of Committee.

meet in the meeting-house, 15th and Race phia Quarterly Meeting's Philanthropic Com-
SUSANNA Rich, Clerk.

streets, Philadelphia, Seventh-day, Tenth month mittee will be held in Schuylkill meeting-house,
29, 1898, at 1.30 o'clock, p. m.

on First-day, Tenth month 30, 1898, at *,* Westbury Quarterly Meeting's Philan- The Sub Committees meeting as follows: 2.30 p. m. thropic Committee have arranged for a public

The Indian in Room No. 2, at 10 a. m.

Subject : “ Temperance." meeting at the meeting-house, Flushing, L. I.,

Peace and Arbitration, in Room No. 3, at Our friend Joseph S. Walton expects to be in on the afternoon of Quarterly Meeting, Tenth

attendance. month 29, at 2.45 o'clock. Mabel Foulke will Colored People, Race Street meeting-house,

An invitation is extended to all. read a paper on “ Friends and Temperance.

The 9.05 a. m. train on the Reading Rail-
HARRY A. HAWKINS,
Improper Publications, in Room No. 4, at road, also the 12.30 p. m., on the Penna. Kail.

road, Schuylkill . Division, will be met at
Purity, in Room No. 3, at 9 a. m.

Phoenixville.

Women and Children, in Room No. 5, at ** The Home Influence Association will 9 a. m.

, meet at Fifteenth and Race streets, on Third

Temperance and Tobacco, in Room No 1, at day, Eleventh month 1, at 3 p. m. A paper II a. m.

*** United Evening Meetings, Philadelphia, " What Does Time Mean to 'the Little

Educational, and Publication Committee, in on First-day, at 7.30 o'clock, during Tenth Child ?” will be presented by Annie Hillborn, Room No. 1, at 9.30 a. m.

month, at Fourth and Green streets, excepting of Swarthmore. A full attendance is desired, Legislation Committee, in Race Street Parlor, on Tenth month 30, when it is at 35th St and as the time of holding future meetings will be at 10 a. m.

Lancaster Avenue, West Philadelphia. The considered.

JAMES H. ATKINSON,

general attendance of our members is urged,

Clerks. MARY H. WHITSON, President, pro tem.

ELEANOR K. RICHARDS,

whether belonging to that meeting or not.

IO a. m.

at 10 a. mn.

10 a. m.

Mary W. ALBERTSON, } Clerks.

ANNA K. WAY:R, } Clerks.

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Write Macbeth Pittsburgh Pa

*** The 63d Annual Meeting of the Library Association of Friends will be held in the Lecture Room of Friends' Central School, 15th and - Race streets, on Sixth-day evening, Tenth month 21, 1898, at 8 o'clock.

At the conclusion of the regular business, including the appointment of officers and Committee of Management for the ensuing year. PROF. F. H. GREEN, of the West Chester State Normal School, will deliver his interesting lecture, “ The Garden of English Literature.''

A large attendance is desired, and all interested are invited.

HOWARD W. LIPPINCOTT, Clerk.

A LITTLE girl wanted to know “if the Puritans were crazy," as she had read that they found an asylum in this country."

UNCLE HIRAM : They say that the sun never sets on the British Empire." Aunt Hannah : " Doesn't it, now? And we have such lovely sunsets over here !" -Puck.

A PARIS physician has lately nipped in the bud, so it is reported, a habit which might have become as dangerous as the use of morphine. A woman of fashion had tried perfuming herself by subcutaneous injections, and found that it was quite possible to give the body the fragrance of the lily or the rose. But her example was imitated with nearly fatal results, and the physician's warning has put a stop to the fad.

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*** A meeting will be held under thc auspices of the Quarterly Meeting's Philanthropic Committee, on Sixth-day, Tenth month 21, at 4 p. m., at Race Street meeting-house (Room No. I), for the purpose of explaining to mothers and teachers a systematic method of teaching sewing.

CASSANDRA T. CARR, Chairman.

Tales of Slavery

are vividly pictured and recalled in the book entitled "A True Story of the Christiana Riot." It has had a remarkable sale, but every Friend should especially have a copy.

Send your order now.

PRICE, $1.00, POSTPAID.

*** The Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting's Committee to visit the smaller branches as way may open, will visit during Tenth month as follows:

23. Merion, 10.30 a. m. ELEVENTH MONTH:

6. Green Street, 10.30 a m. 20. Frankford, 10.30 a. m.

AQUILA J. LINVILL, Clerk.

Lydia A. Murphy, PLAIN AND FANCY MILLINER,

721 Green St., Philadelphia.

LIZZIE J. LAMBERT,

Successor to E. SHOEMAKER, Millinery.

533 NORTH ELEVENTH STREET,

Philadelphia.

CAROLINE RAU,

736 Spring Garden St.,

Philadelphia.
Plain Millinery

MEDIUM FELTS AND STRAW BONNETS.

Richards & Shourds, Jobbing attended to.

CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, AND CONTRACTORS.
1125 Spring St. (first street above Race), Philad'a, Pa.

Thompson Shourds, 2212 Wallace Street.
Charles W. Richards, 1220 Angle St., Tioga.

Address all orders to
Black Dress Fabrics

MARVIN E. BUSHONG,

May P. O., Lancaster Co., Pa. One lot Wool-mixed Poplin, 37 inches

wide. Special price, 25 cents a yard. OLD RICHLAND FAMILIES. One lot of English Mohair Lustre, 38

Handsomely Illustrated, 250 Pages. inches wide. Special price, 3772 cents

Roberts, Foulke, Bolton, Strauwn, Penrose, Morris, a yard.

Green, Shaw, Edwards, Heacock, Thomas, Thomson, One lot of All-wool Storm Serge, 50 Hallowell, Johnson, Ambler, Lester, Jamison, Spencer, inches wide. Special price, 50 cents a The chapter, “ Records of Richland Meeting," is well

worth the cost of the book to descendants of Richland yard.

Friends. One lot of All-wool Cheviot Suitings, 50 Price $3. In pamphlet form, $2.50. On and after the inches wide. Special price, 58 cents a

first of the new year, the price will be advanced to $5

each on all copies remaining. Orders, with the money, yard.

should be sent to

ELLWOOD ROBERTS, One lot of All-wool French Surah Serge,

Norristown, Pa.

N, B. A few copies of " Lyrics of Quakerism for 50 inches wide. Special price, 68 cents. sale at $1.25 each. One lot of All-wool Crepon, effective

designs, 42 inches wide. Special price, Carpetings, Linoleum,
75 cents a yard.

Window Shades, etc.
Handkerchiefs
Some unusual values to-day.

Benjamin Green,
Women's Sheer Linen Lawn Handker-

33 N. Second St., Philad'a. chiefs, trimmed with Valenciennes

BARLOW'S INDIGO BLUE Lace, $1.00 a dozen, or 50 cents a half dozen ; would be fairly priced at $1.50 One small box will make one pint Best Liquid Bluing. a dozen.

Depot 233 N. Second St., Philad'a. Women's unlaundered hemstitched Linen

Handkerchiefs, 70 cents per dozen, or

35 cents a half dozen.
At 25 cents, our latest importation in the
choicest line of designs produced by

The new Almanac will shortly be pubthe best makers. These in Linen or

lished in new and attractive form Mull hemstitched and embroidered or

In addition to the Astronomical Calculations, scalloped and embroidered.

the Almanac will contain a full list of meetings, and the location, and in many cases the mode of

reaching them; information in regard to Day and Mail Orders receive prompt and accurate

First-day Schools; special articles about Fair Hill

Burial Ground, the new Young Friends' Building, attention.

Every Friends' family should possess one or Address orders Department C.' more copies, Order now from Strawbridge & Clothier,

FRIENDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION,

15th and Race Streets, Philadelphia Philadelphia.

CHEAPEST AND BEST.

CHARLES BURTON,

Practical House and Sign Painter,
Office, 907 N. Thirteenth Street,
Residence, 1714 Woodstock Street,

,} Philadelphia, Pa.

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WALL PAPER of

Attractive Styles Popular Prices Samples Free to any Address : . A. L. Diament & Co., 1624 Chestnut St.

Philadelphia, Pa.

S. F. Balderston's Son

WALL PAPERS All Grades,

New Styles for Spring. Estimates Given.

Window Shades Made to Order. 902 Spring Garden St. Philadelphia, Penna.

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THE GUARDIAN TRUST AND DEPOSIT CO.

No. 7 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. This Company does a General Trust and Banking Business. Interest allowed on Deposits. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee (executing Trusts of every kind), Receiver, Guardian, etc. Interests

or Dividends Collected, Real Estate managed for residents or non-residents, etc., etc. President,

Vice-Presidents,

Secretary and Treasurer.
John L. Blake. DANIEL MILLER and JONATHAN K. Taylor. WILLIAM M. BYRN.
Executive Committee :

Wm. H. Bosley, Chairman, Henry C. Matthews, Daniel Miller, George K. McGaw,
Franeis A. White, Matthew C. Fenton, Basil B. Gordon.

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The Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia
409 Chestnut St.

Capital, $1,000,000, Fully Paid.
INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMIN

ISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.
All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the assets of the Company.
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY; Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN; Vice-President and Actuary.
ASA.S. WING; Manager of Insurance Department, JOSEPH ASHBROOKE; Trust Officer,
J. ROBERTS FOULKE; Assistant Trust Officer, J. BARTON TOWNSEND;

Assistant Actuary, DAVID G. ALSOP.

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PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OF PHILADELPHIA.
This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS OF LIFE AND ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at
actual NET Cost. It is PURELY MUTUAL; has ASSETS OF THIRTY MILLIONS, and a SUR-
PLUS of over 3%2 MILLIONS. ITS POLICIES ARE NON-FORFEITABLE AND INCONTESTABLE.
President,

Vice-President,

Secretary and Treasurer, HARRY F. WEST, GEORGE 'K. JOHNSON. HENRY C. BROWN.

J. T. JACKSON & CO., Real Estate Brokers,

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No. 711 WALNUT ST., PHILA.

CAPITAL, $1,000,000
SURPLUS, $2,000,000

THE GIRARD

TRUST CO.

Rents, Sales, Mortgages, etc., etc.

LIFE INSURANCE,

ANNUITY, AND

EASTERN NEBRASKA INVESTMENTS.

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Long or Short Time.
Netting 6 per ct. Interest. With Perfect Security.

Collection of interest and principal attended to without
cost to investor. Correspondence invited.
BANK OF MONROE, Monroe, Platte Co., Neb.
JOSEPH WEBSTER,

WM. WEBSTER,
President.

Cashier.

PETER WRIGHT & SONS

OFFICERS:
EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS, President.

HENRY TATNALL, Vice-President.
WM. NEWBOLD ELY, Treas. and Sec’y.

N. B. CRENSHAW, Real Estate Officer.
EDW. SYDENHAM PAGE, Ass’t Sec'y.

A. A. JACKSON, Ass't to Pres. and Vice-Pres. CHARLES JAMES RHOADS, Ass't Treas.

WM. Ē. AUMONT, Manager Trust Dept.
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM, Solicitor.

MANAGERS:
EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS,
WILLIAM H. JENKS,

Geo. H. MCFADDEN,
, Jr.,
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM,

HENRY TATNALL,
BENJAMIN W. RICHARDS,
WILLIAM H. Gaw,

Isaac H. CLOTHIER,
John B. GARRETT,
FRANCIS I. GOWEN,

John C. SIMS,
PEMBERTON S. HUTCHINSON,

JOSIAH M. BACON.
BROAD AND CHESTNUT STREETS

305-307 WALNUT ST., PHILAD'A. LETTERS OF CREDIT for Travelers.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE bought and sold. The purchase and sale of Prime Investment Securities a Specialty.

Loans negotiated on Real Estate. Interest allowed on deposits.

BAIRD'S Pure,

A LAST OPPORTUNITY

TO BUY

PHILADELPHIA & READING RAILWAY.

DUTCHER'S SHOES.

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Non-alcoholic
FLAVORING POWDERS AND SPICES
Are Strongest, Purest, Best, Most Economical, are the

words of hundreds of customers.
They are the Best, because :
1. They will not lose their flavor by heating.
2. They are true to their flavor and non-alcoholic.

3. One ounce of powder is equal to three of the ordi-
nary liquid extracts.

4. The spices are unequaled for making all kinds of pickles.

The following preparations at 25 cents per box, or five boxes for one dollar.

Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, Strawberry, Cherry, Peach,
Nutmeg, Allspice, Cloves, Ginger, Wintergreen, Pep-
permint, Rose, Celery.

Orders solicited by
Thos. Janney, 3954 Parrish Street, Philad'a.

Owing to early retirement from the Shoe Business, we have reduced our entire stock of WOMEN'S, MISSES', and CHILDREN'S SHOES to

BALLASTED.

Royal Blue Line to New York. Banana, Pineapple, Almond, Chocolate, Cinnamon,

COST AND LESS for quick closing. Every purchase will insure satisfactory bargains in

HIGH GRADE SHOES.

SWIFTEST AND SAFEST TRAINS

IN THE WORLD.

Scenic Reading Route to

READING, HARRISBURG, GETTYS-
BURG, CHAMBERSBURG, SHAMO-

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KIN, WILLIAMSPORT, AND POINTS

A POSTAL CARD RECEIVES PROMPT ATTENTION.

JOHN S. CONRAD,

LAUNDRY, 2103, 2105 COLUMBIA AVENUE, PHILA

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Please mention FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER, when answering Advertisements in it. This is of value to us and to the advertisers,

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