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Hanscoms’.

Our prices are the lowest, our

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JOSEPH. T. FOULKE,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
s 623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia.
OFFICES : | Ambler, Montgomery Co., Pa.

23 North 13th Street (above Market)

. . ol. -
Ea. Troy...;"
a rowo PHILADELPHIA.

variety the most complete, and

quality as near perfect as can be had. Shall we mail you

a price catalogue for comparison 2
No liquors or other offensize goods or methods

resorted to.
1311 Tiarket Street.

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No. 44. Courage, . . . . . . . . 764 THE GIVER AND THE GIFT, . . . . . . 765 EDITORIAL : The Chippewa Indians’ Case, . . . . . 766 Notes, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 766 BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, . . . . . 767 NEWS OF FRIENDS, . . . . . . . . . . 768 THE MOHONK INDIAN CoNFERENCE, . 768 THE DOUKHOFORTSI Movement, . . . . 769 CoNFERENCEs, Associations, Etc., . 770 EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, . . 771 COMMUNICATIONS: The Pennsylvania Hall Mob, . . . . . 771 An Appeal, . . . . . . . . . 771 LITERARY NOTES, . . . . . . . . 771 APPEAL FROM WOMAN’s Hospital, . . 77 I PoEtry : Life Hath. Its Barren Years, . . 772

ANri-SLAVERY RECOLLECTIONS, (Conclu

N INDUSTRIOUS, TEMPERATE, RELIABLE

young man, Friend, desires a position with reliable

firm. Good reference. Address D. MOORE, 415 Linden Street, Camden, N. J

MOTHER WHO HAS MADE S P E CIA L

study of child-development, living in a pleasant, healthful suburb of Philadelphia, desires to take into her home-life, one or two mentally backward, or helpless children. Articulation, hand-training, and kindergarten taught if desired. Exceptional medical facilities. References exchanged. Address W. X., this Office.

MOTHox ATTENTION AND CARE GIVEN to infant or older child, by a Friend, for $3.oo per week. Good reference. Address D., Box 43, Woods

town,

ANTED.—BY A YOUNG MAN, GRADUATE

of a Friends’ school, a position in an office, or

with a wholesale firm. Reference given. Address Lock Box K., Kennett Square, Pa.

HORTHAND TAUGHT INDUCTIVELY OR by usual method, personally or by mail. Eugene C. Lewis, 522 Walnut St., Phila.

ANTED. — IN A FRIENDS' FAMILY A

young woman as mother's assistant. Friend pre

ferred. Reference required. Address Box 377, Easton, Maryland.

ANTED.—AT ONCE, BY A YOUNG WOMAN, a Friend, a position as companion. Address No. 51, this Office.

OR RENT. — TWELVE-ROOM FURNISHED

house. Rent partly taken out in board. Other

boarders obtainable, or quiet home can be made 328 W. FRONT ST., Media, Pa.

ANTED.—OCCUPANTS FOR A DESIRABLE

, second-story front room; southern exposure, bath, close proximity to principal trolley lines. Board in adult family of four. City references given and required. Apply 4061 ASPEN ST., Philadelphia.

ERY CHEERFUL AND DESIRABLE ROOMS for rent with first-class table board. Friends’ family. M. B. L., 1819 Thompson St. OOMS AND BOARD.—CONVENIENT TO railroad and Friends' Meeting-house. Mrs. S. A. GOVER, 1143 Twenty-first Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.

WO PLEASANT ROOMS WITH GOOD

board. Private family, near trolley, and three

minutes' walk from 52d Street Station, 1484 N, 55th street, West Philadelphia.

ARTIES IDESIRING TO VISIT WASHINGTON can be accommodated with rooms and board in a Friends’ family. One block from street cars passing railroad stations, Capitol, and public buildings. Terms, $1.5o a o: Address FRIEND, 1626 Nineteenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.

GEORGE B. COCK,
LAw
CONVENTION X-STENOGRAPHER.
ScIENCE
14 South Broad Street, Philadelphia.
Residence, 216 W. Coulter Street, Germantown.

S. W. BLACK'S SON, Edward T. Black.
REAL ESTATE AGENT
AND BROKER
125 South Seventh Street, Philad’a.

JOSEPH T. FOULKE, A. o.o. delph s 623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. OFFICES : {...}}. Montgomery Co., Pa.

Telephone I-42-25 D.

JOHN FABER MILLER,

sion), . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772
ExPERIENCES OF THE DOUKHOBORTSI,
(Continued), . . . . . . . . . . . 773
THE PROPOSED NATIONAL DEPARTURE, .. 775
MISCELLANY: -
The City Hall Clock; The War-Tax
Stamps; Poison Ivy; Parted in the
Middle, . . . . . . . . . . 777
CURRENT EVENTs, . . . . . . 777
NEws AND OTHER GLEANINGs, . . 778
Notices, . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

- - 9 Our prices are the lowest, our Hanscoms • variety the most complete, and quality as near perfect as can be had. Shall we mail you a price catalogue for comparison ? No liquors or other offensive goods or methods

resorted to.
1311 Market Street.

325 SwedE STREET, NorrisTown, PENNA.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Practicing in Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.

Swarthmore.

For rent or sale, Queen Anne Cottage, I2 rooms, steam heat, and open fire grates. The location is very delightful, directly overlooking the athletic grounds of the College, and very close to the meeting-house; one acre of ground, and plenty of fruit. Apply to DAVID SCANNELL, 814 Arch Street.

WATCHES.

As one of the oldest houses in the watch trade – established three generations ago—and up to date in every feature of the business, we are able to offer the best and most serviceable watches for the least money. Give us a call.

GEO. C. CHILD, 1020 Chestnut St.-2d Floor. Established 18ro at 824 North Second Street.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY MILK. CONSHOHOCKEN Special attention given to serv- HDAIRIES. ing families. Office 603 North Eighth Street, Philadelphia, Penna. JOSEPH L. JONES.

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FOR BOARDING AND DAY PUPILS,

will re-open September 21st, 1898, (17th year). College preparation. For circulars apply to the Principals. ANNIE HEACOCK. LIDA. R. LEMAISTRE.

Wyncote, Pennsylvania.

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Established 1844. The Journal, 1873.

PHILADELPHIA TENTH MONTH 22, 1898.

Volume LV. Number 43.

A GOOD WORD EACH WEEK. XLIII. THE most sacred basis of all things to me [is] the everlasting and unalterable standard of justice. JAMES LOGAN.

From a letter to William Penn, in 1705.

LIFE OF LIFE.

TO him who is the Life of Life, My soul its vows would pay ;

He leads the flowery seasons on, And gives the storm its way.

The winds run backward to their caves
At his divine command,—

And the great deep he holds within
The hollow of his hand.

He clothes the grass, he makes the rose To wear her good attire,

The moon he gives her patient grace, And all the stars their fire.

He hears the hungry raven's cry,
And sends her young their food,

And through our evil, intimates
His purposes of good.

He stretches out the north, he binds
The tempest in his care;

The mountains cannot strike their roots
So deep he is not there.

Hid in the garment of his works,
We feel his presence still -
With us, and through us fathoming
The mystery of his will.
—Alice Cary.

CO-OPERATION.

Read before Swarthmore College students, Tenth month 9, 1898, by Dean Elizabeth Powell Bond. -

IN his letter to the Corinthians the Apostle Paul gave an impressive object-lesson upon the necessity for united labor among those whom he designated “the body of Christ, and members in particular.” He made the human body the illustration,of his thought. “For,” he said, “the body is not one member, but many.” “If the foot shall say, because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; it is therefore not of the body.” - - t “And if the ear shall say, Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body, it is not therefore not of the body.” “If the whole body were an eye, where were the hearing P. If the whole were hearing, where were the smelling P” - *. “But now hath God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him.”

“And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again, the head to the feet, I have no need of you.” “But God hath tempered the body together, that there should be no schism in the body; but that the members should have the same care one for another.” “And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it ; or one member be honored, all the members rejoice with it.” This is a lesson that we can all verify in our own experience. We know well how our comfort, and largely our happiness, depends upon the harmonious working together of the members of our body. However bright the sunshine may be over the face of

the earth, it is a clouded morning for us that finds us

with head or hand out of harmony with the other members of the body. How gladly we would detach the aching member whose distemper has taken the brightness out of the day, and melody out of all the sweet sounds—how gladly we would detach it and lay it away in solitude to heal itself for harmonious service again. But this cannot be. The imprudence in eating or drinking, in work or in play, that makes the aching head, inevitably lays its burden upon all the members, and these must endure the process by which nature can in time restore the lost harmony. It was to those who were consciously or unconsciously founding a new church that Paul the Apostle sent this lesson in harmonious service, earnestly en

treating them to believe that they were members of

Christ's body, some to be Apostles, some to work miracles, some to have gifts of healing, and all to be moved by the spirit of love. This beautiful lesson has much in it for us, at the beginning of a new college year. It is as true of the college as of the church, that we are all “members of one body,” each important in his own place to the welfare of all. In our separate homes also this is true; with the difference that the separate home is a smaller body, with fewer members to be harmonized. The collegebody has nine score and more members to be brought into harmonious activity. At first thought, this would seem to be quite impossible. How can it be that more than nine score members of one body can be made to fit to one another | For our proportions as individual members are very different one from another, so different that we cannot join hands in one long row, and reach one uniform height established by law as the one correct height. There may be nine score and more points of vision, and delicacies of hearing, and degrees of self-control. At one height the eye takes in only the things that are close at hand,-the woods that skirt the next field, and the brook by the roadside;—it does not dream of the glories that are revealed of mountains and sky and sea by a hard climb to a higher level; it does not dream that its pleasures which are only for the hour, are poor indeed beside those joys which are rooted in the Eternal How, then, can the far-seeing and the short-sighted fit themselves one to the other ? If we were cast-iron members this could not be. But human souls, patterned after the Divine, are made for the Divine unity. The far-seeing will not scorn the narrow-vision ; and there will be such light upon him from the hills of God, that others seeing the brightness will ask its source, and try the steeper climb, and find that they too were made for the higher level. One note in the harmonies that reaches the sensitive ear, is the note of infinite patience that waits the slow process of growth from infancy to maturity. If we were cast-iron members we would have to go about prodding one another with our sharp points, irritating old wounds and making new ones. But we are all dowered in greater or less degree with the divine gift of love. Paul, when he had presented his objectlesson concerning the members of the body, added : “Covet earnestly the best gifts; and yet shew I unto you a more excellent way.” that wonderful discourse on the power of love—“If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal.” Here, then, is the secret of accord for the nine score and more members of the collegiate body. Is Paul's noble love among us P. This is the crucial question for each member to measure himself by, teacher and taught. “Love doth not behave itself unseemly ; love seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked.” Youth is subject to sudden impulses to let go restraint, and give free course to tumultuous desires and unseasonable satisfactions ; and “un

seemly ’’ behaviour among the nine score members

of the college body is like grains of sand thrown among the wheels of delicate machinery. Paul's noble love withers away the germs of unseemly behaviour. “Love seeketh not her own.” This is only another way of saying “Love delighteth to coöperate with her neighbor.” He who perpetually seeks his own must go about as one with cast-iron members, thrusting aside whatever he regards as standing in his way. Among students, he who seeks his own is on the low plane of vision that cannot see beyond the moment's indulgence. It is his pleasure to throw his work to the winds, and amuse himself—it matters not to him that to his neighbor this very moment for work is like gold in his pocket, and to yield up the moment is like giving up his gold to a thief. It matters not to him that his self-seeking view of things would wreck the best interests of the college. He allies himself with those whom Watts, the great English artist, has portrayed in his picture of Mammon—an unlovely creature with his hand crushing a fair maiden, and his heavy foot upon the neck of a noble young man. Paul's noble love is the antidote for the poison of self-seeking, and is the very life of all coöperative effort. - “Love is not easily provoked.” This message is

Then he gave them .

less for you than for me. I have tried to bring clearly before you that it is the spirit of coöperation alone that can make a place of peace and unity in which nine score members can work together as the collegiate body. Very keenly do I realize that only as my own soul is baptized in this noble love, can I hope to point out the way to you, and help you to see the best things in life, and help you to make hard climbs upward. It is often borne in upon me that if I could be enough loving, I could shine away all the difficulties of our coöperative life. I want you to know that I listen to Paul's message not only for what it has for you, but still more for what it has for myself. There is one other thought which I would bring clearly before you—our coöperation with each other is our only way of coöperating with God. I believe that words stand for very little with God. I believe that you and I might rise upon our feet for the whole of this hour set apart for “religious service,” as the world designates it, and say or sing over and over the words of the psalmist, “I will praise Thee with my whole heart: before the gods will I sing praise unto Thee. I will worship toward thy holy temple, and praise thy name for thy loving kindness and for thy truth,”—we might have this hour of words without ever reaching the ear of our Father. But I believe that we cannot have one impulse of care for each other's welfare, one effort of self-restraint that keeps us silent rather than interrupt each other's work, that its vibrations do not reach to the heart of Infinite Love. How can he care for the great temples or the rudest meeting-houses we would build to his honor, with his own forests of timber and quarries of stone ! How can he care for the tones of the organ, or our spoken praises, except so far as they strengthen us to do the things he would have us do for each other—his little children. To this beautiful, loving service of coöperation with our Heavenly Father in the daily and hourly concerns of life, we are all called. There is no high nor low in this service; no respecting of persons. There is the individual tie between every human soul and the Infinite Father. And, as the consciousness of this close, individual relation with the Divine is cherished in our heart of hearts, it will gradually open the way to us for perfect coöperation, human and Divine.

For Friends’ momence. INDIANA YEARLY MEETING.

THIS was held at Waynesville, Ohio. The first session was that of Ministers and Elders, which convened on Seventh-day, at 2 o'clock p. m. Minutes were received for Abel Mills of Illinois Yearly Meeting, and for Sarah J. Price, of Baltimore Yearly Meeting. There were other visiting Friends without minutes; each one of whom by silent travail or the spoken word added strength to our gathering. On First-day morning, as the assembly gathered into the quiet, we felt the over-shadowing of the Divine Presence. The silence was broken by the words, “I trust that we all carry the sanctuary of the Lord as one man, waiting to be fed with the bread of life. We should count it a great blessing that God

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