Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

NOTICES.

*** First-day evening meetings (Philadelphia) are held this month at 15th and Race streets, at 7.30 o'clock, excepting First month 30, when it is at 35th street and Lancaster avenue, West Philadelphia. It is very desirable that our members should be in attendance regularly.

*** Quarterly meetings in First month occur as follows : 25. Western, London Grove, Pa. 27. Caln, East Caln, Pa. 29. Westbury, New York City. Scipio, North Street, New York.

*** Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting's Visiting Committee has made the following appointments : FIRST MonTH, 1898 : 30. Reading, at Io. 30 o'clock. CHARLES E. THOMAS, Clerk of the Committee.

*** The Visiting Committee of Baltimore Yearly Meeting have arranged for meetings during First month, as follows : 23. Goose Creek and West Nottingham. 30. Washington. JOHN J. CORNELL, Chairman.

*** The Philanthropic Committee of Westbury Quarterly Meeting will hold a public meeting in the meeting-house, East 15th street and Rutherfurd Place, New York, Seventh-day, First month 29, at 3 p. m. Anna Rice Powell will read a paper on “The Revival of State Regulation in India and England, and Its Bearing upon this Country.” Addresses by Dr. O. Edward Janney, Aaron M. Powell, and others. HARRY A. HAWKINS, MARY W. ALBERTson, *** The meetings of the Home Influence Association will be held on alternate Third days, instead of Sixth-days, as heretofore, beginning Third-day, First month 18, at the usual time and place, Race Street meeting-house, at 3 p.m. Subject for Third-day, First month 1, 1897: “The Development of High Ideals in Children.” To be presented by M. Travilla, West Chester.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Women’s Popular Winter Shoes, an exceptional assortment in box calf and plump Vici kid, Goodyear welts. They are substantial in every way and possess every degree of comfort, at $3.OO per pair.

Boys’ and Youths’ School Shoes, of Titan calf, heavy double soles and extension edges. We can recommend them for their excellent we a ring qualities. Boys' sizes, 2% to 5%, $3.OO. Youths’ sizes, II to 2, $2.75.

Little Boys’ Shoes, of Crack Proof calf, spring heels. Thoroughly reliable and made with full, broad, round toe shapes. Sizes, 9 to I3%. C, D, and E widths, $1.25.

Misses’ & Children’s School Shoes, of Kangaroo calf, broad toes and comfortable shapes. We guarantee every pair. Laced and button. Misses' sizes, II to 2, $1.50. Children’s sizes, 8% to II, $1.25.

Mail Orders receive prompt and
accurate attention

Strawbridge & Clothier,

PHILADELPHIA. Department “C.”

Af

[blocks in formation]

WALL PAPER of - Attractive Styles

Popular Prices
Samples Free to any Address

A. L. Diament & Co.,

1624 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, Pa.

S. F. BALDERSTON'S SON

will continue the business of

|PER HANGINES AND WIND| SHADES At 902 Spring Garden St., Philad’a.

Orders from Friends solicited.

The Jackson Sanatorium

Dansville, Liv. County, New York.

Offers exceptional advantages to those who are ill or who need rest and change of scene.

ITS WINTER CLIMATE

is excellent, being in sheltered locality, on an Isothermal line, as to temperature, giving it great advantage over many Northern Resorts.

EXPERIENCED REGULAR PHYSICANS IN CHARGE

ALL FORMS OF

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

AND JOURNAL.

PHILADELPHIA, 921 Arch STREET, FIRST MONTH 29, 1898.

PUBLISHED weekly BY Friends’ Intelligencer Association, t; (LIMITED.)

SINGLE SUBSCRIPTION, $2.oo PER ANNUMI.

To subscribers residing west of the Mississippi River a discount of one-fourth from this rate, making the price $1.5o per annum. o those who get up and forward “Clubs’ we will give one extra copy, free, for each ten subscribers. Single copies, 5 cents.

SUBscRIPTIONS MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIME. "

WHEN IT. Is Desired to Discontinue, NoTICE MUST BE Given. We Do Nor “STOP’’ PAPERs except UPon ORDER OF SUBSCRIBER.

OFFICES: 921 ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHEcks, Drafts, or Post-office Money ORDERs; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of the person, so sending. Æol)raw checks and money orders to the order of FRIENDs’ INTELLIGENCER AssoCIATION, LIMITED. -

CoNTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

A GooD WoRD EACH WEEK.—V., . . . 69
PoETRY: PRAY 1 . . . . . . . . . . . 69
JoHN RUSKIN.—I. : BY JOHN WILLIAM
GRAHAM, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
SKETCH OF NEW GARDEN MEETING: By
Ellwood MICHENER, Illustration), . 72
Notes ON Josh PH. CLARK’s Journal, . . 73
FRIENDS' NEW TESTAMENT LESSONS.—
No. 6, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Scripture Study at Race Street, . . . . . 74
Temperance Lessons: Handicaps, . . . 74

[blocks in formation]

COMMUNICATIONS :
The Southern Schools, . . . . . . . . 8o
BENJAMIN, BUTTERWORTH, . . . . . . . 81
FROM MoUNT PLEASANT SCHOOLs, S. C., 81
A PIONEER FRIEND's LIFE, . . . . . . . 82
PoETRY: What is Worth While? . . . . . 83
WoULD NOT WEAR A SworD, . . . . . . 83
BIRD LIFE IN ALASKA, . . . . . . . . 84
GERMAN PEOPLE KEPT IN THE DARK, . . 84
LECONTE AND KIEFFER PEARs, . . . . . 85
CURRENT EVENTs, . . . . . . . . . . . 85
NEws AND OTHER GLEANINGs, . . . . . . 86
WESTERN HOMES : REPORT TO ILLINOIS
YEARLY MEETING, . . . . . . . . . 86
NoTICES, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

Practical Aouse and Sign Painter,

Office, 907 N. Thirteenth Street *
Residence, 1714 Woodstock so Philadelphia, Pa.
Durable Work

HENRY C. ELLIS, Reliable Workmen

Aouse and Sign Painting. . r12 N. TENTH ST.

Residence, 404 N. 32d St.

Richards & Shourds, Jobbing attended to
CARPENTERs, BUILDERs, AND ContRACTORs.
1125 Sheaff St. (first street above Race), Philad'a, Pa.
Thompson Shourds, 2212 Wallace Street.
Charles W. Richards, 1220 Angle St., Tioga.

the ELEVENTH ANNUAL

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

bublisher's HBrpartment.

*** We are now in receipt (24th inst.), of a postal money order for $1.5o, from Pasadena, Cal., dated First month 18. As there was no accompanying letter, we are unable to credit the sender with the amount. Perhaps this notice will reach his, or her, attention.

*** “I am very much pleased with the appearance o the paper in its new dress,” writes a valued friend in Baltimore, and adds: “It never looked as well as it does now, and I think it improves steadily from year to year, in interest and value.” This is a friendly word, indeed, and we can only hope it is not unmerited.

*** So many requests for the review of “ Hugh Wynne" come to us that we have sent to press a second edition of the small pamphlet, and will now be able, we think, to answer all requests for it. We make no charge for it, but if any who send choose to enclose a stamp for postage, envelope, etc, we are obliged. We will cheerfully forward to names that may be furnished us.

WATCHES.

As one of the oldest houses in the watch trade established three generations ago—a d up to date in every feature of the business, we are able to offer the best and most serviceable watches for the least money. Give us a call.

GEO. C. CHILD,
1020 Chestnut St.—2d Floor.
Established 1810 at 824 North Second Street.

WILLIAM B. PAxson. MAHLon B. PAxson. Members of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange.

FREDERICK PAXSON & CO.,

Stock and Bond Brożers, r12 Custom A/ouse Place, Philad 'a.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

The house has every convenience, including steam heat and an electric elevator running to level of pavement. Open all the year. Send for illustrated booklet.

JAMES HOOD.

Lectures—1897–8

Aaron M. Powell. Editor of Żhe Philantthropist, will accept a

- limited number of lecture engagements,

• New LECTURE
“Life and Times of William Lloyd Garrison.”

OTHER LECTUREs:
I. “Wendell Phillips.”
II. “Whittier.”
III. “George Fox.”
IV. “New Glimpses in Europe.”
V. “Woman as a Citizen.” -
VI. “Purity and the White Cross.”
: VII. “The National Drink Problem.”

iAddress for dates and terms, The PHILANTHRopist, United Charities Building, N. Y.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PRAY

BE not afraid to pray—to pray is right.
Pray, if thou canst, with hope ; but ever pray,
Though hope be weak, or sick with long delay ;

Pray in the darkness, if there be no light.

Far is the time, remote from human sight,
When war and discord on the earth shall cease ;
Yet every prayer for universal peace

Avails the blessed time to expedite.

Whate'er is good to wish, ask that of heaven,
Though it be what thou canst not hope to see ;

Pray to be perfect, though material leaven
Forbid the spirit so on earth to be :

But if for any wish thou darest not pray,
Then pray to God to cast that wish away. . . .
- —Hartley Coleridge.

For Friends' Intelligencer.
JOHN RUSKIN."
BY JOHN willIAM GRAHAM.
I.—RUSKIN AT HOME.
IT often occurred to me when on the others de of the
water that those Americans who are concerned for the

true welfare of their country, and aware of its peculiar : dangers, would find in John Ruskin's teaching a gospel

of especial value to them in their social efforts—enough . needed truly in commercial England, but perhaps

even more to the point in the business portions of the United States. - .

Not that everything that Ruskin has written has been even approximately true or wise.

utterances are lacking in that finely balanced modera- :

tion which ought to be one of the results of University | the loneliness of his life. “ My dear friends, Mr. and

training. Measured statement is not one of his achievements. We do not meet in his works that convincing gravity and balance of judgment which are so rarely found combined with prophetic insight and the burning heart. These latter, united to a marvellous

power of language, are John Ruskin's gifts for the

race, and we cannot do better than be grateful for them, and ourselves apply that discriminating reserve of caution which is a much commoner gift.

kindliness and cordial greeting.

With these reservations, I venture to write a few papers for the INTELLIGENCER about a man to whom I owe Some of the most precious gifts that any one can receive from another, and whom I, along with thousands of his readers, have learned to love as a friend. We wil begin with a visit which I once had the honor of paying to John Ruskin at his home at Coniston in

| that “Lake District" of Northern England, which is

a home-land to me, and full of literary interest to us all.

Near the parsonage at Keswick where Frederick Myers worked still stands the old-fashioned house

wherice Southey looked out on Skiddaw; the vales of | Grasmere and Rydal are consecrated as the home of | Wordsworth even by those who forget the Coleridges and Thomas de Quincey, and under the hillsides about | there nestle the homes of Harriet Martineau and Mrs.

Fletcher, of William Edward Forster, and his father

in-law, Dr. Arnold. There is a consciousness of being
among the haunts of cultivated people, that one misses
among the wilds of Argyllshire and the County Kerry.
The literary associations of the Lake District form in-
deed full material for a two-volume work by Canon
Rawnsley. -
Such as these were my half-conscious reflections as
we drove one morning in the July of 1884, on one of
the red-letter days of my life, down to the vale of Con-
iston, consecrated now and henceforward to the name
of John Ruskin, and were welcomed at the gate of
Brantwood. Mr. Ruskin was at the moment out, but
a girl-guest of his came out to meet us with frank

[ocr errors]

Brantwood, when Ruskin bqught it, was an old

- *

| plain house, among the woods which fringe Coniston

Water. A country road with no house on it for four miles in one direction (a wonderful thing in England), runs at the foot of the garden between the house and the lake. Across the water stands the mountain called

the Old Man, with rows of cottages at its base, and to

[blocks in formation]

- -, - - - - - | piece of architectural patchwork, having been greatly Most of his

enlarged at the back and the higher side to accommodate a family of cousins who live with him and dispel

Mrs. Severn,” he told us, “find this place so good for their children, that this has been built for them, and now I consider the house more theirs than mine; only this little bit of it you see I use myself.” (For Mrs. Severn, “Joan,” who has taken the woman's part for many years in Mr. Ruskin's home, see “Joanna's Care,” in “Preterita.”) We were a large company, and though we had been invited I felt ashamed of

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »