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AND JOURNAL.

PHILADELPHIA, 921 ARCH STREET, EIGHTH MONTH 20, 1898.

Publisher's Department.

Educational.

Swarthmore College,

Friends' School,

*** The . Post-office Department has made a .. new rule in relation to forwarding mail matter of the " second," " third," and " fourth

fourth" classes the rule being that it will not be " forwarded" to another address, without additional payment of postage. This is of importance to those who receive newspapers, and expect them to be forwarded when their place of residence changes. Thộ newrule does not apply to letters. Mail matter of the three classes mentioned, to which it does apply, is practically periodicals sent from office of publication, other printed matter, and merchandise.

ANNA W. SPEAKMAN,} Principals.

*** A School for instruction in Phonography, upon the Pernin System, has been established at 20 S. Broad street, Philadelphia, by Freeman P. Taylor. He is the Nephew.of our friend Nathan Edsall, of Hartland, Iowa, who commends him to Friends in this city. The Pernin system, he assures us, is an improvement upon other systems, and the schools for teaching it, in other cities, have met with much success.

WEST STREET, WILMINGTON, DEL, SWARTHMORE, PENNA.

Exceilent advantages for complete school course. WM. W. BIRDSALL, President.

Thorough preparation for college or technical school.

Training class for Kindergarten teachers. Under care of Friends. Send for Catalogue.

Year BEGINS NINTH MONTH 12TH.

For catalogues and information apply to
Friends' Central School,

ENOS L. DOAN, Principal.
FIFTEENTH AND RACE STS.,
PHILADELPHIA.

George School,
Under care of the Monthly Meetings of Philadelphia ;
furnishes a practical, guarded education, and pre- NEAR NEWTOWN, BUCKS COUNTY, PA.
pares for college.

Under the care of Philadelphia Yearly

Meeting of Friends.

Course of study extended and thorough, preparing Circulars on application.

students either for business or for College.

For catalogue, apply to
Friends' Academy,

GEORGE L. MARIS, Principal,

George School, Penna.
LOCUST VALLEY, LONG ISLAND.
A Boarding and Day School for Boys and Girls, under

Martin Academy,
the care of Friends.
Thorough instruction to fit for business or to enter

KENNETT SQUARE, PA.
college. Board and tuition $150 per school

year.

New
Building with modern conveniences.

Under care of Friends. Thorough instruction. Lib.
For particulars, address

eral course. Prepares for Swarthmore and similar colPRINCIPAL FRIENDS' ACADEMY Locust Valley, Long Island, N. Y.

leges. Primary, Intermediate and Academic Courses.

Expenses very low. Send for catalogue.
Abington Friends' School,

EDGAR STINSON, Principal.
FOR BOARDING AND DAY PUPILS OF BOTH SEXES.

Swarthmore
Near Jenkintown, Penna., 10 miles from Philadelphia.

Grammar
Under the care of Abington Monthly Meeting. Liberal

Swarthmore, Pa.
course of study. Students prepared for college or busi- School
ness. The home-like surroundings make it especially

Primary, Intermediate, High School, attractive to boarding pupils. Students admitted when

and College Preparatory Classes. Send ever there are vacancies. Send for circulars to LOUIS B. AMBLER, Principal,

for catalogue containing particulars,

references, and letters from parents. Or

Jenkiniown, Pa.
CYNTHIA G. BOSLER, Sec'y, Ogontz, Pa.

ARTHUR H. TOMLINSON, Principal.

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Chelten Hills School,

Chappaqua Mountain Institute, FOR BOARDING AND DAY PUPILS,

A FRIENDS' BOARDING SCHOOL FOR will

BOYS AND GIRLS.
re-open September 21st, 1898, (17th year). Coilege
preparation. For circulars apply to the Principals.
ANNIE HEACOCK.

The building is modern, and the location is the hill
LIDA R. LEMAISTRE. country thirty-two miles north of New York City.

For Circulars, address
Wyncote, Pennsylvania.

CHAPPAQUA MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE,

Chappaqua, New York,
Darlington Seminary,
FOR YOUNG LADIES.

THIRTY-SECOND ANNIVERSARY OF THE
Near the beautiful borough of West Chester, Penni.

UNIVERSAL PEACE UNION,
Forty-second School Year commences Ninth month

MYSTIC, CONN.
I2th next. Beautiful and healthy location. Grounds, 27
acres. Mathematical, Scientific, Literary, and Linguistic

In the Peace Grove and Peace Temple of the Peace Courses of Study. Also an Art Department. New Gym- Union, Eighth Month 24, 25, 26, and 27. Morning sesnasium. This school has been uniformly successful for

sions, 10.30 to 1. Afternoon sessions, 2.30 to 5.30. nearly half a century. Pupils from almost every State. At this critical time in the history of this country, and Eight instructors, mostly specialists. Terms, $190 a year. while war is pending with Spain, the annual convention For j'lustrated Catalogue address the Principal.

of the Universal Peace Union will be ot especial interRICHARD DARLINGTON, Ph. D., est. Should peace be declared by the time of the meetWest Chester, Penna. ing it will be a jubilee occasion.

It is expected that Alfred H. Love, the President, WEST CHESTER (PA.) will preside at several of the sessions, and that the fol

lowing speakers among others we cannot announce as STATE NORMAL SCHOOL we go to press, will attend :

Ex-Governor J. W. Hoyt, of Washington, D. C.; Fits for teaching, college, professional schools, or Belva A. Lockwood, Washington, D. C. Amanda business. Ideal location. High grade teachers and

Deyo, Philadelphia, Professor Daniel Batchellor,

Philadelphia; Honorable William N. Ashman, Pbilateaching. Buildings and equipment unsurpassed. Finest delphia; David Ferris, Wilmington, Del:;. George school gymnasium in America. $5 per week.

Dana Boardman, Philadelphia ; William Lloyd Garri

son, Boston; Professor George D. Herron, D. D., Address G. M. PHILIPS, Principal, Grinnell, Iowa.

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“BRAINYASSISTANTS, TUTORS, Stenographers, CLERKS,

Such AS TEACHERS, GOVERNESSES, MATRONS, COMPANIONS, ETC., supplied without charge. Telephone 1-41-63 D. CENTRAL EDUCATIONAL BUREAU (EDW. C. DIXON) 1420 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA.

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SPECIAL OFFER.

TWENTY WEEKS FOR FIFTY CENTS.
To New Subscribers,

We will send FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER, from Eighth Month 20th
to end of year, making Twenty Weeks,

For Fifty Cents.
The Coin can readily be sent in a coin-card, which we will furnish,
if applied to. Or we will take postage stamps. Or two names sent

together can be paid with a $1 note.
Reports of the Conferences

of Friends, to be held at Richmond, Indiana, Eighth Month 22 to
26, will begin in the issue of FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER for Eighth
Month 27, and continue (including the papers read, etc.), for several
weeks.

SUBSCRIPTIONS MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIME.
WHEN IT IS DESIRED TO DISCONTINUE, NOTICE MUST BE
GIVEN.

We DO NOT “STOP” PAPERS EXCEPT UPON
ORDER OF SUBSCRIBER.

OFFICES : 921 ARCH ST.,

ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

ADVERTISING RATES. -For transient advertisements, 10 cents per line, one time; 772 cents per line each insertion, two times. For longer insertion reduced rates, which will be furnished upon application.

Swarthmore.

REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHECKS, DRAFTS, or Post-Office MONEY ORDERS; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of the person so sending. Draw checks and money orders to the order of FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER AssoCIATION, LIMITED.

JOHN FABER MILLER,
325 SWEDE STREET, NORRISTOWN, Penna.

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Practicing in Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.

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We have the Best $3, $4, and $5

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Spring and Summer Shoes.

Samuel Dutcher, 45 N. 13th St.

HOW TO BUILD A

588 588

SILO

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

JOSEPH T. FOULKE,

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, A Good WORD EACH WEEK. –XXXIV., • 579

OFFICES :

623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia.

Ambler, Montgomery Co., Pa. POEM: TRUE RICHES,

. 579 LETTERS FROM DISTANT MEMBERS, (Con

CHARLES BURTON, tinued),

• 579

Practical House and Sign Painter,
RELICS OF FRIENDS IN BARBADOES,

580
W. E. GLADSTONE ON War, (Continued), 581 Residence, 1,14 Woodstock tercet, } Philadelphia, Pa.
PRINCIPLES AND TESTIMONIES OF FRIENDS,
No. 35: Business Integrity, . 582 HENRY C. ELLIS, Durable Work

Reliable Workmen
EAST AMERICAN INDIANS,

583

House and Sign Painting
EDUCATION FOR DOMESTIC LIFE,

584
Residence, 404 N. 32d St.

I12 N. TENTH ST,
ARRESTED THOUGHT,

585 EDITORIAL:

Richards & Shourds, Jobbing attended to. The Cessation of War,

· 586

CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, AND CONTRACTORS. Notes,

586 1125 Spring St. (first street above Race), Philada., Pa.

Thompson Shourds, 2212 Wallace Street. Births, DEATHS,

586, 587

Charles W. Richards, 1220 Angle St., Tioga.
Reduced RATE TO INDIANAPOLIS, . 587
NEWS OF FRIENDS :

AQUILA J. LINVILL,
Westbury Quarterly Meeting,

587 Dealer in Choice Lehigh Coal, Notes, FROM ELIZABETH POWELL BOND,—II.,

1827 North 10th Street, Philadelphia. THE NEXT CONFERENCE PLACE,

· 590 FRIENDS AT CHAUTAUQUA, THE IDAHO FRIENDS' COLONY,

· 590 The DJUKHOBORTSI MOVEMENT,

· 591

N. W. Cor. 9th and Master Sts. POEM BY DR. MITCHELL,

(P. & R. R. R.)

591 CONFERENCES, ASSOCIATIONS, ETC., · 592

LEHIGH AND COAL FREE BURNING
COMMUNICATIONS:
A Confusion of Ideas,

Telephone Connection.

· 592 A BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION,

592 METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR SEVENTH Month,

· 593 POETRY: The Demon War,

· 593 SPANISH TRAITS AND THE NEW WORLD, 593

23 North 13th Street (above Market) MISCELLANY: Spurgeon's Proverbs; In

613 Walnut Street.

Law and Conveyancing genuity and Gin; Stronger than the

BLANKS.

PHILADELPHIA.
Men; Intoxicants in War; Dwellings
Manila,

596 | Barlow's Indigo Blue Cheapest and Best CURRENT EVENTS,

597

PIROMM & KINDIG, NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS,

598

Successors to D. S. WILTBERGER,
NOTICES,

. iii
Hanscoms'.

Our prices are the lowest, our

variety the most complete, and MONTGOMERY COUNTY MILK.

quality as ncar perfect as can be had. Shall we mail

you CONSHOHOCKEN Special attention given to serve a price catalogue for comparison ?

DAIRIES, ing families. Office 603 North No liquors or other offensive goods or methods Eighth Street, Philadelphia, Penna.

resorted to. JOSEPH L. JONES.

1311 Market Street.

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ASK

590 John C. Hancock & Co.,

E. F. Schlichter,

321 Vine Street,

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PHILADELPHIA.

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A GOOD WORD EACH WEEK.

hold a membership with us; but in my family, as well XXXIV.

as outside, I try to have the principles of simplicity, It is a duty for those who profess to believe in the truth, and a quiet waiting on the will of a Supreme

Being and submission to it, govern me always. Knowguidance of an ever-present loving Father, to preserve a

ing nothing of the Beyond, I feel if we do well here it cheerful aspect amid petty annoyances, as well as greater will be well with us there.

W. G. trials. If it be required of them to put on a garment of City of Mexico. sackcloth. let them wear it underneath, in quiet submission. ELIZABETH NEWPORT.

It is comforting to feel, though deprived of attend

ing the meetings of Friends and of mingling with From her Note-Book, Third month 4, 1864.

them, I am remembered and held in religious fellowship. I should feel it a privilege to have a visit from

a minister or other Friend, who should feel drawn to For Friends' Intelligencer. this isolated locality.

W. C. K.
TRUE RICHES.

Eldridge, Fla.
Not the gain of miner's toil
Rich hued gold and diamond bright,

We are still Friends, rarely attending the meetings
Not in vaults by watch and ward
Safely guarded day and night.

of other denominations in any capacity. They try

hard to get us to work with them, but their ways and Not wide halls, where acres fair

forms have but little attraction for us. We enjoy the Circle woodland, vale, and lea; Honor, fame, or stocks and bonds,

First-day rest and quiet with our books, periodicals, and All are little worth to me.

letters, the two latter usually received at the post-office

on Seventh-days.
Surely hidden from the foe
Deep the mine and rich its store,

We think it a grand move in the right direction
From thence my needs supply,

for the Yearly as well as the Monthly Meeting to keep Still it yieldeth more and more.

up a correspondence with its distant members, not only From the fount whence fullness is

for the good of members, but for the Society. Are my treasures manifold :

Argusville, N. Dak.

S. M. E.
Richer far than gems of earth
Safe within my heart I hold.

There are very few members of our Society in this
How I prize my goodly store,

State, not enough in any one locality to organize a Fain would scatter as I go,

ineeting. Much of my sụccess in life I attribute to When in Heaven I reach the source

my early training under the correct principles promulI the real worth will know. M. ALICE BROWN. gated by our Society and so earnestly advocated by

[.
Helena, Mont.

J.
LETTERS FROM DISTANT MEMBERS.
(Continued.)

Words cannot express the gratitude I feel in read-
Extracts from replies to the Epistle to Isolated ing this beautifnl letter ; I intend to keep it always,
Friends, sent out by Philadelphia Yearly Meeting : for I value it highly. I have always had a desire for

Many years have passed since I have seen any of my that “attendant privilege of frequent mingling with family, much less had the pleasure of sitting among kindred minds," spoken of in the letter and by my my kind in our quiet meetings, waiting for spiritual parents, who once had this privilege, but now like food; but the careful motherly teachings of youth myself are isolated from it. (though at the time the seeds were sown they came I feel proud of this birthright inheritance, and I near to being choked by the rebellious character of hope some day to come into closer communion with the ground) have since seen the light, and are now the Friends' meetings. My mother has often spoken bearing fruit. Each year my faith in our simple tenets of the devoted interest of Friend for Friend, and I grows stronger, and our lives here are as conscien- | have felt this to some extent through her. tiously lived as though surrounded by early associa- I suppose it is because of being isolated from my tions. Indeed, I feel that any one who has ever own meeting that I have not been a regular attendant obtained a thoroughly grounded Quaker education, of any one meeting, always going where I could listen will realize more fully, as age advances, the truth to the most able discourse, having attended the Conbeauty, and simplicity of our faith.

gregational church more than any other. Of all I know in this great land, none but myself I should certainly “feel it a privilege and favor to

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be visited by ministering Friends, and to have such the lot, probably modern, and the interior seems to Friends appoint meetings in the neighborhood.” There be taken care of. A large tropical tree stands in it. is a great deal of room here “to extend the lines of A person is living in Barbadoes who remembers the Christian thought, purity of action, and holy life ; and ground in old times when gravestones were to be seen to further spread the Christian principles of righteous- there. There is a small square house on one corner ness and peace to the honor and glory of God." of the ground which it is supposed was originally a Dundee, Mich.

J. B. P.

tomb. A member of the Gibson family altered it into

a kind of shop, for which purpose it is now used. Pil-. The FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER is received by most of | grim Burial Ground is immediately in front of the our members, and oftentimes passed on from one to

Government House near Bridgetown, but the site another, and we think exerts a very good influence. bears no marks of having ever been a cemetery.

We do not know of any copies of Scattered Seeds The Burial Ground at Speightstown has been acbeing received. We also have a small library at our quired by the parish of St. Peter, and is now included meeting, and would be very thankful if any one has

in the enclosure of the St. Peter's church-yard. There books that they would like to send us. Some friends

were formerly many tombs and gravestones in it, but in Chicago have sent books at different times to add

as enclosed it cannot be told which belonged to to the collection. I do not think that. Friends that

Friends. It appears to have remained neglected for have always lived among Friendly people know what

a long time, and only in recent times passed into the it is to live in a country where so many people do not

care of the Episcopalians, who removed the wall that even know that there is a Society called Friends.

separated it from the cemetery of this parish. San Francisco, Cal.

A. W. S.

The ancient cemetery close to St. Philip's church

yard, and which probably originated nearly two cenWhile I am denied the privilege of worshiping

turies ago, is still preserved in good condition and with Friends, I know that God is ever present with

known as the Quakers' Burial Ground. It is surme, and has duties for me to perform to advance his

rounded by the humble habitations of the negroes, and cause and help upbuild his kingdom. Though not

seems to be kept in a reasonably fair condition. It is able to attend the meetings of our Society, I always

not in special charge of any one, but is looked after attend religious worship with the Methodists of this

by the Episcopalians. It is an enclosure about twenplace, as they are the only denomination that has an

ty-four feet square, surrounded by a stone wall about organization here. I teach in their Sabbath school

seven feet high, with an iron gate at the entrance. and take an active part in the work of the Chistian

Entering this gate there is a descent by some five or Endeavor. I hold my membership in the Society of

six stone steps to a yard excavated in the coral rock Friends very dear, and earnestly strive to lead a life that is a credit and honor to it. May God bless and

in the shape of the letter T, which is several feet beprosper our Society, is my earnest prayer !

low the surface of the outside ground. Around this Utica, Kansas.

F. B.

yard and opening from it there are nine tombs hewn in the rock, the openings to which are arched and

closed with stone slabs. One of these immediately opRELICS OF FRIENDS IN BARBADOES.

posite the steps has over it the inscription R. W., George Vaux, of Philadelphia, recently published in The Friend, which undoubtedly represents Ralph Weeks. Another a historical paper on

"The Decline of Friends in Barbadoes." supplementary article, published in the issue of Seventh month 30, he

tomb to the right of this has inscribed over it the letadds as below.

ter G. This may have belonged to the Gibson famSINCE the [former article was written, a friend of the ily. The slabs closing two of the tombs are partly writer has visited Barbadoes and collected such facts broken away, leaving openings through which leaden in relation to Friends as were accessible. The informa- coffins can be seen. tion is scanty, but the little obtained possesses suffi- When the first Moravians arrived in the island in cient interest to be preserved in an addendum.

1687, their missionaries were entertained by the JaekThere seems to be no reasonable doubt that the man family, who were Friends. They lived on a planrecords of Friends have perished, and it is supposed tation still known as Jackmans', though the family is that they were destroyed in the great hurricane of extinct. The first Moravian meetings were held at 1832.

the Jackman house. The Moravians are now a numerThe descendants of Friends seem to have entirely ous body in the island. disappeared from the island. Only one or two could

GEORGE VAUX. be heard of and they were of other persuasions.

The view heretofore expressed that the property This truth comes to us more and more the longer of Friends was appropriated by others, mainly by those that we live, that on what field or in what uniform or who were descendants, is fully confirmed.

with what aims we do our duty matters very little, or The burial-ground and meeting-house site in even what our duty is, great or small, splendid or Bridgetown is now in the hands of the Wesleyans. obscure. Only to find our duty certainly and someIt was sold to them by the Gibson family, who were where, somehow do it faithfully, makes us good, among the last descendants of Friends. The Wes- strong, happy, and useful men, and tunes our lives leyans have some buildings on the site used as a mis- into some feeble echo of the life of God.-Phillips şion. There is a stone wall and iron railing around Brooks,

In a

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WASTEFUL EXPENDITURE.

W. E. GLADSTONE ON WAR.

TO THE LADIES, ON PEACE. (Continued from last week.)

When I look at the inscription which faces me on

yonder gallery, I see the words “ Peace, Retrenchment In regard to this great Eastern Question, I am one of

and Reform." All these words, ladies, are connected those who have objected to the vote of six millions.

with the promotion of human happiness in what some I object to it because it is an unnecessary charge on would call the desert of this world, and the political the country. I object to it because it is waste, and

world would be an arid desert indeed if we could not worse than waste. I object to it because it is an at

hope that our labors would tend to increase human tempt to mix up military preparations with peaceful happiness, to diminish the sin, the sorrow of the world, negotiation. One subject which it is the fashion to

to do something to reduce its grievous and overwhelmabuse is that the late Government paid three millions

ing misery, to alleviate a little the burden of life for to the American Republic on account of the damages

some, and to take out of the way of struggling exceldone by the Alabama and other privateers. ' I do

lence those impediments at least which the folly or the not say that I am glad we paid the money, but I say

greater offence of man has offered as obstacles to its we are entitled to the credit of endeavoring in a very

progress. These are the hopes that cheer, and ought to practical case to bring to bear peaceful methods in the

cheer, the human heart amidst the labors and the settlement of international questions, instead of a

struggle of political life. But of the three words, resort to violence, which is, after all, a cruel and

“Peace, Retrenchment and Reform," the one word barbarous system. In regard to that payment I may upon which I would say a few more special words to remark, also, that the charge of three millions was

you on this occasion is the word “ Peace." paid out of the surplus revenue of the year, and that we

Is this, ladies, a time of Peace ? Cast your eyes were enabled to apply a large sum in the same year to

abroad over the world, think what has taken place in the reduction of the National Debt. Our endeavor to

the last three or four years.

Think of the events narrow the range of questions to be settled by the

which have flooded many a hill, many a plain, with sword, and to exclude the sword as far as we could

blood, and think with regret and pain of the share from the settlement of international difficulties, was a

which you, not individually, but which your country step onwards towards civilization ; but what is this?

collectively, has had in that grievous apparition. It is exactly the reverse. It is a step backwards from

If we cast our eyes to South Africa, we behold civilization. It is setting an example to the people of

the nation which we term savages have, in defence of Christendom which has never, to my knowledge, been their own land, offered their naked bodies to the terriset before-that when they go into a peaceful Congress bly improved artillery and arms of modern military to discuss matters round a table, they are to prepare science, and have been mowed down by hundreds and for it by putting every dockyard and every arsenal | by thousands, having committed no offence, but havinto a state of preparation for war. That is the

ing with a rude, ignorant courage done—and done principle which is involved in this vote—whether it is

faithfully and bravely—what were for them the duties intended for war I do not ask now—and that is the

of patriotism. Go from South Africa to the regions of principle to which I am inflexibly oppored. --Speech Central Asia, go to the lofty hills of Afghanistan as at a Deputation, March 23, 1878.

they were last winter, and what do we there see? I

fear a yet sadder sight than was seen in the land of the I own I am able to understand what sufficient Zulu. It is true that with respect to the operations of reason there is why the meeting of this Congress, the war in Afghanistan you have seen none but official which is the one thing necessary to effect the accounts, or hardly any but official accounts, and many pacification of Europe, should be further delayed. It of the facts belonging to that war have not been is necessary for the pacification of Europe—I might brought under the general notice of the British public. say it is necessary for the prosperity of England. All I know that it is necessary and wise in certain cirthese doubts and uncertainties are weighing like an cumstances to restrain what might be the injudicious incubus upon the prosperity and enterprise of this and exaggerated, and therefore the dangerous, comcountry. For that reason, but also for higher reasons, munications that might proceed from irresponsible I do hope that no mere matter of diplomatic etiquette, persons ; but at the same time I deeply regret that we no mere matter of national or ministerial vanity, no have not been more fully informed as to the proceed-desire to obtain a diplomatic victory where no other ings of the war in Afghanistan. What we know is victory has been obtained, will be allowed either to this, that our gallant troops have been called on to prevent or to interrupt a meeting of the Powers of ascend an elevation of many thousand feet, and to Europe in the Councils of Europe. I am not pre- operate amidst the snows of winter. We know that judging these questions—certainly I am not prejudg- | that was done, not in the territory of Afghanistan ing them in the interests of a particular Power. But proper, but in those border lands inhabited by hilllook at them as you like, look at them with tribes who enjoyed more or less a political indepenmagnifying glass if you will, what is there in them to dence, and did not own a clear allegiance to the justify war ? And I say that to rush into war without | Afghan ruler. a sufficient and justifiable cause is to commit a crime You have seen during the last winter from time to than which there is no greater in the face of Almighty time that, from such-and-such a village, attacks have God and of His suffering creatures.-Ibid.

been made upon the British force, and that in conse

BERLIN CONGRESS.

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