Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

to come.

tree.

satisfied claims against the government for six months'

It Begins at Home. pay, and entertain scant hopes of ever receiving it. The Outlook exhorts the United States to share with other

Throughout the whole peninsula and in every nations the responsibility for the world's well-being.” If the branch of trade and manufacture the same dismal story

United States will begin this charitable and excellent work at

home it will have as niuch as it can attend to for some years is told. In Cadiz the population is face to face with

When the responsibility for the well-being of the blank ruin. Ships laden with Spanish cargoes for the

United States of America shall be fairly and fully discharged colonies are obliged to deposit them in that city, where it will be ample time to consider the sharing of responsibility trade and commerce are already dead. Barcelona,

for some of the rest of the world. In the mean time it would whose rapid growth and comparative wealth were de

be a bumptious officiousness that would be negligent of our

own and meddlesome and hypocritical towards others.pendent upon the markets of Cuba and the Philippines, Doylestown (Pa.) Intelligencer. is suffering incalculable losses. Works and factories there have been closed, thousands thrown out of em

A Great Buttonwood Tree. ployment, to whom forced idleness is equivalent to A CORRESPONDENT of the Hartford Times gives some facts starvation, and beggardom is assuming proportions

about the great button-ball tree in front of the old Barnard which dismay and baffle the police. To make matters

House, in Hartford, which has been recently cut down. Many

pounds of honey were taken from the hollow trunk, from worse, other occupations which seemed independent of

which a swarm of bees issued and attacked those felling the the war are suffering at the hands of nature, and every

It was stated to be 9 feet in diameter, and a rough thing seems hostile to Spain. In Xerez, for instance, measurement shows it to have been at least 23 or 24 feet in the ravages of the redoubtable phylloxera are such

circumference, and from the following notice, copied from the

"Hartford Directory'' of 1883, its age may have been 300 years: that in a couple of years more the native vintages will

"The oldest tree now alive in this city, is a few rods south of have entirely disappeared, and sherry wine, in the good and near the foot of Ferry street. It is assumed to be over old sense of the term, will have become a thing of the

300 years old—a button-ball, or sycamore, 24 feet in circum

ference at the base, and, like the Charter Oak, is hollow, and past.

has been submitted to a fiery ordeal.” No wonder if under such appalling conditions of existence the people should exhibit no enthusiasm for

Death of Parker Pillsbury. the hollow phrases of glory, honor, patriotism, etc.,

PARKER PILLSBURY, who would have been 89 years old next which are being trumpeted abroad by eloquent young September, passed away Seventh month 7th, at his home in men whose heads are filled with names from Greek Concord, N. H,, where he had lived for about fifty years. and Roman history and whose ambition yearns for His wife died in Second month last, and of late he had been a place in the Cortes. I could give many startling in- prostrated with the weakness of old age. He awaited the end stances of the realistic current among the people, es

with truly philosophic contentment and cheerfulness. . He grew

old gracefully and kept his interest in public affairs to the end. pecially in those who have to bear the brunt of the

For years he had kept up correspondence with the narrowing But I have said enough to make it clear that circle of those who had shared with him in the trials and triSpanish politicians who have ruined their country are

umphs of the abolition period. Only two of those co-workers

with him are still living, Samuel May of Leicester, Mass., and not the Spanish people, who only ask to be let live in

Charles K. Whipple of Newburyport, both nearly as old as peace. .

Parker Pillsbury.

His career was very nctable—from a farmer's boy in New " Thou Callest Me Friend."

Hampshire, coming to “ the shore'' seeking work at nineteen ; THERE are a good many incidents reported from the war that

working there for several years, then to the farm again; then

to school ; then to Andover ; then an orthodox minister ; then encourage, in the midst of discouragement, the hope that

joining Garrison and the abolitionists. He abandoned the after all "man's inhumanity to man is on the decline.

Congregational ministry to become an anti-slavery agitator. Here is an incident reported in a letter from the American

He used to be called by the public the “sledge-hamrner” of camp at Santiago, a few days after the hard fighting there, at

the abolitionists, because he dealt the hard blows and used the beginning of the siege. The correspondent says:

hard words, and, indeed, his rhetoric was very strong. It "While all these wounded were being cared for at Siboney has been said that Emerson remarked that he considered the Spanish wounded were not being neglected. It is impos-Pillsbury was the strongest, intellectually, of all the famous sible to say that the Spaniards are not brave fighters, after anti-slavery workers. They all had different gifts ; Garrison once seeing the bearing of their wounded as they fell into the had the fiery strength of denunciation and demand ; Phillips hands of our men. Every man of them fully expected to be had grace and eloquence and what is called position ; Foster massacred on the spot. Here is one instance :

applied the severity of logic ; Pillsbury the severity of rhetoric ; On Sunday morning, near General Shafter's headquar- while Lucrettia Mott and Lucy Stone had sweetness in their ters, a dozen wounded Spaniards were having their wounds stern and earnest testimony ; and Douglass and Redmond dressed. One young fellow, who was shot through both legs, poured out torrents of eloquence on behalf of their enslaved lay on the ground. The surgeon was trying to ask him to brethern. Other helpers and workers each had their pronounmove his leg so that his boot could be unlaced, when Mr. ced individuality, and all had the intense earnestness which Charles Pepper, the Washington correspondent, volunteered comes from strong convictions. to act as interpreter. Stooping down to the Spaniard he gave In 1853 Pillsbury went abroad for two years, spending most the message, and, as is the Spanish custom, he prefaced his of the time in England, among philanthropists who extended renark with 'Amigo.' Instantly the young Spaniard's face to him most cordial hospitality. He conducted the Herald of lightened with amazement and delight. He grasped Mr. Freedom at Concord, N. H., from 1840 to 1846, and the NaPepper by the hand and exclaimed incredulously :

tional Standard in New York in 1866. In 1868-70 he was the Thou callest me friend!'

editor of the Revolution, a paper published in New York City "Mr. Pepper explained the remark to the two other cor- and devoted to the cause of woman suffrage. Afterward he respondents with him, and when they, too, shook hands with was a preacher for free religion societies in Salem and Toledo, the Spaniard and helped the surgeon to unlace his shoes, it O., Battle Creek, Mich., and other western towns. Besides was really a study to watch the surprised expressions of the pamphlets on reform subjects, he published “Acts of the Antiother Spaniards.

Slavery Apostles."

war.

[ocr errors]

CURRENT EVENTS.

Corn for Bread in Europe. YEAR by year, says the Indianapolis Ncws, Indian corn, which is so large a proportion of the entire product on our farms, is coming into more favor abroad, and the exports of it are increasing. Statistics issued from Washington, show that with the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898, the exports of American corn will amount to more than 200,000,000 bushels, for which the American farmer will have received upward of $60,000,000. Sixty per cent. of this grain has been bought by England and Germany. Germany has bought this year 30,000,000 bushels of corn, as against 1,000,000 in 1888. There is every reason to believe that, as corn and its products, corncake, cornbread, and other well known American delicacies, become better known in Europe, the market for this grain will increase, to the great profit of the American farmer.

The movement of troops, under the command of General Miles, for the capture of the island of Porto Rico, began last week, and on the 25th inst., a dispatch from St. Thomas, (an island near Porto Rico, belonging to Denmark), announced that the troops were landing near Ponce, on the south coast of Porto Rico, across the island from the city of San Juan, the capital. It is said that a total of 35,000 troops will be sent on this expedition, and that no immediate collision with the Spanish forces is expected, as it will take “some time" to get the force landed, and in condition for action.

It now appears that all the Spanish troops in the district commanded by General Toral, and included by him in his act of surrender at Santiago, have given themselves up to General Shafter, or will do so. He estimates the total about as originally stated, 22,000 to 23,000. A dispatch from Santiago on the 25th says : “The 7,000 Spanish soldiers at Guantanamo laid down their arms to-day. The 3,350 from Palma Sorriano, San Luis, and Longo surrendered yesterday to Lieutenant Miley, and to-day pack trains with provisions were sent them. The only others included in the capitulation are 2,000 troops at Baracoa, and 1,000 at Sagua. They have not yet been turned over, but they are nowhere in General Garcia's vicinity.

The Great Oak at Drayton Manor. WHAT, so far as we can judge from our observations, says Garden and Forest, is the most massive, symmetrical, and imposing tree in eastern North America, is a live oak, Quercus virens, standing on one side of the entrance to Drayton manorhouse, on Ashley river, near Charleston. The home of the Drayton family, a handsome red brick Elizabethan mansion, was built while South Carolina was a British colony, and it is said that the site of the house was selected on account of this tree, although, as the live oak grows very rapidly, it is not impossible that it was planted with its mate on the other side of the drive when the house was first built.

At the present time the short trunk girths 23 feet 4 inches at the smallest place between the ground and the branches, which spread 123 feet in one direction and 119 feet in the other. The tree is growing over a bed of phosphate, and the demands of trade will therefore probably cause its destruction before its time. More than once we have visited this tree, and each visit has increased our reverence for nature as we stocd in the presence of this wonderful expression of her power. No one who has not seen the Drayton oak can form a true idea of the majestic beauty of the live oak, the most beautiful of the 50 species of oaks which grow within the borders of the United States, or of all that nature in a supreme effort at tree growing can produce.

GENERAL SHAFTER's troops remain at Santiago, and will do so, it is stated, until the Spanish prisoners are sent away. The Spanish ships, with which the contract was made for the deportation, are expected to begin to arrive at Santiago soon. Many cases of fever continue among the American troops, but most of them are malarial, and the death rate from these is said to be under two per cent, of the cases. General Shafter reported about 500 new cases of fever on the 24th, a few of these being genuine yellow fever. About 450 who had recovered returned to duty the same day. There are many cases of typhoid fever among the troops at Camp Alger, Va., and it is now stated that the camp is not to be removed.

The reading public is likely to be ensnared many times by false dispatches in the daily papers. A very precise and circumstantial news dispatch was printed one day near the close of last week, saying that Garcia, the Cuban commander, had attacked a column of Spanish troops on the way to give up their arms at Santiago to Shafter, and that they (the Cubans) had been severely defeated. On the 25th inst., a dispatch from Santiago said : General Shafter authorizes an absolute contradiction of the report that Garcia encountered a force of Spaniards, who were returning to Santiago to surrender and was defeated by them."

There is no further news of importance, at this writing, from Manila. Anxiety over possible international trouble there continues. Four Russian warships have left Port Arthur, and it is supposed their destination is the Philippine Islands. Japan has sent four warships to Saiseho to reinforce the Japanese squadron there. The squadron has been ordered to coöperate with the British and American admirals, in the event of international complications. Bodies of American troops continue to sail from San Francisco to Manila.

Boiling Water Without Fire. It is possible to make a pail of water boil without putting it on the fire, and without applying external heat to it in any way. In fact, you can make a pail of water boil by simply stirring it with a wooden paddle. This feat was recently performed in the physical laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, and any one may do it with a little trouble and perseverance. All you have to do is to place your water in a pail-it may be ice water if necessary—and stir it with a wooden paddle. If you keep at it long enough it will certainly boil. Five hours of constant and rapid stirring are sufficient to perform the feat successfully. The water will, after a time, grow

hot--so hot, in fact, that you cannot hold your hand in it, and, finally, it will boil. Professor Ames, of Johns Hopkins, annually illustrates some of the phenomena of heat by having one of his students perform the trick in front of his class. It is a tiresome job, but it is perfectly feasible.

The point which Professor Ames wishes to illustrate is what is known as the mechanical equivalent of heat. quires just so many foot pounds of work to develop a given quantity of heat. By turning the paddle in the water at a regular speed it is possible to find out just how much work is required to raise the temperature of water one degree.

Heat is developed in almost any substance which is subjected to continuous or very violent action. It is an old trick for a blacksmith to forge without fire. Long continued or violent hammering on two pieces of wire will heat them to such an extent that they can be welded together. A lead bullet, if shot directly at a stone wall, will develop heat enough by the contact to melt and fall to the ground a molten

'

It re

CONTRADICTORY reports continue to come from Spain as to the disposition of those in control there to “sue for peace. There is apparently no idea entertained at Washington that any intention or suggestion of peace should be made by the United States. On the 25th inst., a dispatch from Madrid by way of London, said that the Spanish Government had drawn up a message, addressed to the Government at Washington, proposing an armistice for the purpose of discussing terms of

Some interest has been aroused in the announcement that a young American woman, of Milwaukee, Wis., Miss Jessie Schley, had gone from Paris to Madrid to influence the Government there to make peace. She is, it is stated, the daughter of a cousin of Commodore Schley, and her father is said to have written to her forbidding her from persisting in her effort.

peace.

mass.

:

A CALL, signed by over one thousand persons, representing every State in the Union, has been sent out by the Civic Federation of Chicago for a National Conference at Saratoga, New York, on the 19th and 20th of next month, to discuss the future policy of the United States, as to the acquisition of territory as a result of the war with Spain. The consideration of the subject is to be open to all shades of opinion, but the movement is prompted by persons opposed to “imperial" schemes.

In the midst of the war which we are conducting it seems that international arbitration makes headway. It was announced on the 25th instant that Admiral Canavaro, Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs, and the Argentine Minister to Italy, Senor Enrique Mereno, have signed a general arbitration treaty between Italy and Argentina.

A DISPATCH from London announces that a new GovernorGeneral of Canada has been appointed in succession to the present incumbent, the Earl of Aberdeen. The new official is the Earl of Mints. His name is Gilbert John Elliott, he was born in 1845, has served in the army; but resigned in 1&70, and is described as a Liberal in politics.

AT Wilmington, Del., on the 25th instant, in the United States district court, the trial of R. R. Kenney, of Dover, one of the two United States Senators from the State of Delaware, who was charged with aiding and abetting William N. Boggs, formerly a clerk in the First National Bank of Dover, in a misuse of the bank's funds, came to an end, the jury, after nearly three days' deliberation, being unable to agree. It is said they stood 7 to 5 for acquittal. Boggs and two others had already been tried at previous terms of the court, for looting the bank, and convicted. It appeared that Senator Kenney had been associated with Boggs in business operations, and had been his counsel ; the question on the trial was whether he had knowledge of Boggs's peculations. It is supposed there will be another trial of the case.

of Dr. Joshua D. Janney was destroyed, with contents.

The horses were saved.

Governor Hastings has appointed Dr. J. T. Rothrock, of West Chester ; Isaac B. Brown, of Corry ; Dr. George G. Groff

, of Lewisburg, and Albert Lewis, of Wilkesbarre, members of the State Forestry Reservation Commission, of Pennsylvania, to take charge of the State forest reservations. Another member is to be appointed.

-Letters received from managers of Canadian mines at Dawson say the gold commissioner estimates the production of gold in that region, the last year, at $7,000,000.

It would have been more but for the number of men having to leave last winter on account of the anticipated scarcity of provisions and the consequent scarcity of labor at the mines.

-A New York newspaper, the Sun, is responsible for the statement that there is in that city an old clothes dealer who . has just entered upon a new branch in his line of business, that of furnishing old, worn, army uniforms to " beats" and professional beggars, who represent themselves as sick and wounded soldiers on their way home.

-Miss Margaret Richardson, of Norristown, Pa., has passed an examination for admission to the Montgomery county bar, and will be the first woman lawyer in that county.

Stocks of Manila hemp are becoming very small in this country because of the war and blockade in the Philippines, and this hemp is the chief raw material reliance of the rope and cordage factories. Prices are already about three times as high as they were at the beginning of the year.

---President E. Benjamin Andrews, of Brown University, has been elected superintendent of the Public Schools of Chicago, and has resigned the presidency of Brown. The election at Chicago was not without some friction.

His successor at Brown is not yet chosen.

-The town of Pugwash, Nova Scotia, was destroyed by fire on the 25th inst. Two hundred dwellings, five churches, twenty stores, three hotels, and several mills were burned. The buildings were of wood, and there was no fire apparatus. The inhabitants encamped in the fields and woods.

Because of religious scruples,' says a news item, the Germania Band, of Quakertown, Pa., has refused to give Sunday evening sacred concerts in the trolley pavilion between Quakertown and Richlandtown." Glad to hear of it.

-It has been decided that the ships taken in Santiago harbor by the surrender of that city become United States property, rot as prizes of either army or navy. This is in accordance with a former Supreme Court decision.

- The Council of the city of New York have adopted an ordinance against swearing and vile language in the streets or in public conveyances, and there is some suggestion that it is to be enforced.

NINETEEN Austrian sailors who were on the wrecked steamship Bourgogne were, on the 25th inst., charged before a magistrate in Havre with cruelty and brutality at the time of the collision, by four second-class passengers. Six of the accused were held on remand. The others were discharged.

NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.

NUMEROUS cases of the destruction of barns by fire have been reported in the region about Philadelphia. Among these was the large barn of Israel L. Bartram in Willistown township, Chester county, burned on the 14th inst., with the new crops of wheat and hay. The stock and a part of the machinery werė saved. At Westfield, N. J.,.on the 17th inst., the barri

NOTICES.

streets, Spring Garden St., Columbia Avenue, * Quarterly meetings during Eighth month *** Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting will be

and Chelten Avenue Station, Germantown, and occur as follows: held on Third-day, Eighth month 9, at 10 returning to 12th and Market streets, also to

2. Concord, Concord, Pa. o'clock a m., at Valley meeting-house.

Germantown (by exchanging cars at Columbia 3. Iurchase, Purchase, N. Y.
Special arrangements have been made to con-
Avenue Station) will be issued at 60 cents the

Farmington, Orchard Park, N. Y. vey Friends to and from Maple Station, on round trip.

4. Abington, Gwynedd, Pa. Chester Valley railroad, a short distance from

The return train, Third-day, will leave Maple 9. Philadelphia, Valley, Pa. the meeting-house.

Station at 4.26 p. m. Ask for special tickets to 13. Salem, Salem, O. Members of the Select Meeting can take the Friends' Quarterly Meeting at Mapl:.

Pelham Half. Yearly Meeting, Sparta, 1.36 p. m. train from 12th and Market streets, It is very desirable, and the committee hope,

Ont. on Second-day (the 8th) for Maple Station that all Friends who possibly can will avail

Miami, Green Plain, O. (without changing cars at Bridgeport), where themselves of the liberal arrangements thus 15. Fairfax, Goose Creek, Va. Friends will meet them.

secured-otherwise such favorable conditions 20. Short Creek, Ohio. Friends residing at Germantown can take the may be withdrawn.

22. Warrington, Menallen, Pa.

Chas. E. THOMAS, 12.55 p m. train from Main Street Station,

25. Stillwater, Plainfield, O.

EDMUND WEBSTER, making connection with the 1.36 train from 12th

Committee.

Bucks, Falls, Pa. and Market streets at Columbia Avenue Station.

JOSEPH W. THOMAS,

26. Nottingham, E. Nottingham, Pa. Tickets good to those desiring to return to the

29. Ohio Yearly Meetins', Mt. Pleasant, O. city on Second-day evening, who will take the

Duanesbury, N. Y. 7:32 train from Port Kennedy.

The next Conference under the care of 30. Burlington, Mt. Holly, N. J. On Third day, train will leave Chelten Concord Quarterly Meeting's Committee on

31. Southern, Easton, Md. Station, Germantown, at 7.25 a. m., making Philanthropic Labor will be held in the meeting

Easton and Saratoga, Granville, N. Y. connection at Columbia Avenue with the train house at Willistown, Pa., on First-day, Seventh leaving 12th and Market streets at 7.36 a. m. month 31, 1898, at 2.30 p. m. Tickets good going on Second- and Third

CHARLES PALMER, Clerk,

*** Friends' day at Home for Aged Colored days, can be purchased at 12th and Market

P. (). Box 218, Chester, Pa. | Persons, First-day, 31st inst., 3 p. m.

[ocr errors]

3 o'clock.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

1624 'Chestnut St.

[ocr errors]

** A Conference under the care of the Phil

We are satisfied with small profits.

Leather Goods anthropic Committee of Philadelphia Yearly and

-. It brings us many 'sales, Bucks Quarterly Meetings will be held in the

Our stock of Traveling Requimeeting-house at Yardley, Bucks...county, on Serge Suits, $7.50 First day, Eighth month 7; 1898, at 3 p. m.

sites, such as SuitThe meeting will be addressed by Joseph S. About 200 Suits in checks, plaids,

Cases, Bags, HatWalton. Subject : "Improper Improper Publications.” and other fashionable Summer styles

Boxes, SteamerAll are respectfully invited to attend. On behalf of Committee, have been re-marked at $7.50. They

Trunks, Belts, SUSANNA Rich, Clerk, are from our regular stock, well made

Shawl-Straps, etc., and desirable--so desirable that

is satisfyingly com*** A Circular Meeting, under the care of a Committee of Concord Quarterly Meeting, will there's only a small quanity of each plete, and a saving is sure on every be held at Newtown Square, Delaware county, style, the bulk of each line having purchase. on First-day, Eighth month 7, to convene at been sold. The prices were $10 and Sole Leather Suit Cases, tan and olive, Mary P. HARVEY, Clerk. $12.50. Now $7.50 to clear.

steel frames, linen-lined, 6 inches deep, Plenty of Serges at $7.50.

22 inches long, $5.00. *** A meeting under the care of the Com- Nothing like them at any way near

Grain Leather Traveling Bags, brassmittee on Education of New. York Yearly Meet

trimmed, leather-lined, 14-inch, $4.50 ; ing will be held at 2.30 p. m., Seventh month the price.

15 and 16-inch, $5.00 ; 17 and 18-inch, 30, (after Westbury Quarterly Meeting), at

$5.50. Westbury, L. I.

E. 0. THOMPSON'S SONS,

Special-Real Morocco Belts, stiched, The meeting will be addressed by the Presi- 1338. CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA. PA. nicket or leather.covered buckles, worth dent of Swarthmore College, William W. Birdsall. It is expected that Helen Magill

50 cents, at 25 cents. White will also be present. All interested are WALL PAPER of

Alligator, Seal, and Morocco Belts, with invited to be present.

military and harness buckles, from 50

Attractive Styles
WM. M. JACKSON, Clerk.

cents to $1.50.
Popular Prices

Silk Belts, with oxidized or gilt buckles, * The Visiting Committee of Baltimore Samples Free to any Address

25 cents to $4.50. Yearly Meeting has arranged for the following A. L. Diament & Co., White Belts, in Leather and Silk, from meetings during Seventh month :

Philadelphia, Pa. 25 cents to $6.00.
31. Washington and Bush Creek.
JOHN J. CORNELL, Chairman.
Carpetings, Linoleum,

Mail orders receive prompt and accurate * Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting's Com

attention. mittee to visit the smaller branches as may

Window Shades, etc.

Address Orders to “Department C." open, will attend the following meetings : Reading, Seventh month 31.

Benjamin Green,
AQUILA J. LINVILL, Clerk.

Strawbridge & Clothier, 33 N. Second St., Philad'a.

PHILADELPHIA. The Christiana Riot

S. F. Balderston's Son is a memorable event, owing to the persecution of Castner Hanway and other mem

WALL PAPERS bers of the Society of Friends. The true story

New Styles for Spring.

UNDERTAKER of this affair has been gathered and made into a book by David R. Forbes, editor of the QuarryWindow Shades Made to Order.

and EMBALMER ville Suin. It is endorsed by such able critics as

902 Spring Garden St. Philadelphia, Penna. Joseph S. Walton, Hon. W. U. Hensel, and

ESTABLISHED 1860. many others. It is neatly printed on good paper,

TELEPHONE 5807. strongly bound in cloth, liberally illustrated,

HOW TO BUILD A and worth the money.

No. 1313 Vine Street,

SILO
PRICE, $1.00, POSTPAID.
Address all orders to

Ellwood Heacock.
MARVIN E. BUSHONG,
May P. O., Lancaster Co., Pa.

E. F. Schlichter,
321 Vine Street,

CLEMENT A. WOODNUTT,
FOULKE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
Taken at Reunion at Gwynedd, May 30. $1.00.

Undertaker Photograph of Edward Foulke's House.

and Embalmer, J. MITCHELL ELLIOT, West Chelten Avenue, Germantown.

AQUILA J. LINVILL,

1728 GIRARD AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA. H. L. ROBERTS & CO., 15 S. 13th St., Philad'a. Dealer in Choice Lehigh Coal, ,

Telephone 66-99-A.
Swarthmore.

1827 North 10th Street, Philadelphia. For rent or sale, Queen Anne Cottage, 12

ээээээээээээээээээээээээ rooms, steam heat, and open fire grates. The location is very delightful, directly overlooking the athletic grounds of the College, and very

Friends' Book Association

N. W. Cor. Ith and Master Sts. close to the meeting-house; one acre of ground,

(P. & R. R. R.) and plenty of fruit. Apply to DAVID SCANNELL, 814 Arch Street.

LEHIGH AND COAL FREE BURNING Publishers, Booksellers and Stationers, WATCHES.

Telephone Connection.

Blank Book Manufacturers, As one of the oldest houses in the watch

Engravers and Printers, The Right Shoe for trade - established three generations ago-aod

Best Shoe

Artists' Materials, up to date in every feature of the business, we are able to offer the best and most serviceable

YOU CAN GET.

Kindergarten, School Supplies. watches for the least money. Give us a call.

We have the Best $3, $4, and $5
GEO. C. CHILD,

Spring and Summer Shoes.

S. W. Corner Fifteenth and Race Streets. 1020 Chestnut St.--2d Floor. Established 1810 at 824 North Second Street. Samuel Dutcher, 45 N. 13th St.

EEEEEEEEEEEEEE€€€€€€€€EEE

[graphic]
[graphic]

All Grades,
Estimates Given.

[graphic]

܀

ASK

[ocr errors]
[graphic]

PHILADELPHIA.

.50.

DEALERS IN BEST GRADES OF

You is the

The Royal is the highest grade baking powder known. Actual tests show it goes one

third further than any other brand.

THE GUARDIAN TRUST AND DEPOSIT CO.

No. 7 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. This Company does a General Trust and Banking Business. Interest allowed on Deposits. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee (executing Trusts of every kind), Receiver, Guardian, etc. Interests

or Dividends Collected, Real Estate managed for residents or non-residents, etc., etc. President,

Vice-Presidents,

Secretary and Treasurer.
JOHN L. BLAKE. DANIEL MILLER and JONATHAN K. Taylor. WILLIAM M. BYRN.
Executive Committee :

Wm. H. Bosley, Chairman, Henry C. Matthews, Daniel Miller, George K. McGaw,
Franeis A. White, Matthew C. Fenton, Basil B. Gordon.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]

The Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia
409 Chestnut St.

Capital, $1,000,000, Fully Paid.
INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMIN-

ISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.
All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the assets of the Company.
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY; Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN; Vice-President and Actuary,
ASA S. WING; Manager of Insurance Department, JOSEPH ASHBROOKE; Trust Officer,
J. ROBERTS FOULKE; Assistant Trust Oficer, J. BARTON TOWNSEND;

Assistant Actuary, DAVID G. ALSOP.

[graphic]

PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

ROYAL BAKING-POWDER CO., NEW YORK.

OF PHILADELPHIA.
This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS OF LIFE AND ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at
actual NET Cost. It is PURELY MUTUAL; has ASSETS OF THIRTY MILLIONS, and a SUR-
PLUS of over 372 MILLIONS. ITS POLICIES ARE NON-FORFEITABLE AND INCONTESTABLE.
President,

Vice-President,

Secretary and Treasurer, HARRY F. WEST. GEORGE K. JOHNSON. HENRY C. BROWN.

J. T. JACKSON & CO., Real Estate Brokers,

[graphic]

No. 711 WALNUT ST., PHILA.

CAPITAL, $1,000,000
SURPLUS, $2,000,000

THE GIRARD

TRUST CO.

Rents, Sales, Mortgages, etc., etc.

LIFE INSURANCE,

ANNUITY, AND

EASTERN NEBRASKA INVESTMENTS.

[blocks in formation]

Long or Short Time.
Netting o per ct. Interest. With Perfect Security.

Collection of interest and principal attended to without
cost to investor. Correspondence invited.
BANK OF MUNROE, Munroe, Platte Co., Neb.
JOSEPH WEBSTER, WM. WEBSTER,
President.

Cashier.

CHARLES JAMES RHOADS, Ass't Treas.

OFFICERS:
EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS, President.

HENRY TATNALL, Vice-President.
WM. NEWBOLD ELY, Treas. and Sec’y.

N. B. CRENSHAW, Real Estate Officer.
EDW, SYDENHAM PAGE, Ass’t Sec’y.

A. A. JACKSON, Ass't to Pres. and Vice-Pres.

WM. É. AUMONT, Manager Trust Dept.
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM, Solicitor.

MANAGERS:
EFFINGHAM B. Morris,
WILLIAM H. JENKS,

Geo. H. MCFADDEN,
JOHN A. BROWN, Jr.,
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM,

HENRY TATNALL,
BENJAMIN W. RICHARDS,
WILLIAM H. Gaw,

Isaac H. CLOTHIER,
John B. GARRETT,
FRANCIS I. GOWEN,

John C. Sims,
PEMBERTON S. HUTCHINSON,

Josiah M. Bacon.
BROAD AND CHESTNUT STREETS

[graphic]

305-307 WALNUT ST., PHILAD'A. LETTERS OF CREDIT for Travelers.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE bought and sold. The purchase and sale of Prime Investment Securities a Specialty.

Loans negotiated on Real Estate, Interest allowed on deposits.

[graphic]

Merchants' Trust Company, PHILADELPHIA & READING RAILWAY

.

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
PERSONALLY

CONDUCTED TOUR

WATKINS GLEN, NIAGARA FALLS,

THOUSAND ISLANDS, QUEBEC, ST. LAWRENCE RIVER, AU SABLE CHASM,

LAKE GEORGE, SARATOGA, ETC.

611-613 CHESTNUT STREET.

ANTHRACITE COAL. NO SMOKE. CAPITAL (subscribed),

$500,000.00 CAPITAL (paid in), .

250,000.00

NO CINDERS. DOUBLE TRACKED, SURPLUS,

50,000.00 UN DIVIDED PROFITS,

HEAVY STEEL RAILS. STONE

30,094.49 Interest allowed on Deposits. Titles to Real Estate

BALLASTED.
insured, and conveyancing done. Loans made on Mort-
gage and Approved Collateral. Surety entered for Ad-
ministrators and others. The Company also acts as
Administrator, Guardian, Trustee, etc. Safe Deposit Royal Blue Line to New York.
Boxes to rent from $2 and upwards, per annum.

SWIFTEST AND SAFEST TRAINS
JOSEPH R. RHOADS, President.
JOHN F. LEWIS, Vice-President.

IN THE WORLD.
ROBERT MORRIS EARLY, Sec. and Treas.
WM. B. LANE, Title and Trust Officer.
DIRECTORS.

Scenic Reading Route to
NICHOLAS BRICE,

EDWARD S. SAYRES,
SPENCER M. JANNEY,
T. BOLTON WINPENNY,

READING, HARRISBURG, GETTYS-
S. DAVIS PAGE,

ĚLLWOOD BECKER,
Joseph R. RHOADS,
EDWIN S. Dixon,

BURG, CHAMBERSBURG, SHAMO-
JOHN F. LEWIS,

WARREN G. GRIFFITH,
THOMAS R. Gill,
SAMUEL BANCROFT, JR.,

**N WILLIAMSPORT, AND POINTS
CHAS, S. HINCHMAN, EDWARD G. McCOLLIN,
ALFRED I. PHILLIPS.

PASVLVANIA.

July 26 to August 8, 1898

RATE
Covering All Necessary Expenses

[merged small][merged small][graphic][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE

ATLANTIC CITY.

CLEANLINESS

AND COMFORT.

23 North 13th Street (above Market)

613 Walnut Street.

SAFETY AND

Residence, 210 W. Coulter St.

SPEED.

Law and Conveyancing

BLANKS.

PHILADELPHIA.

1-42-25-D.

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »