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Friends Near Richmond, Va.,--Crenshaw. Among the white troops the largest number of discharges JOSIAH W. LEEDS, who has been making a visit to North

were as follows :: consumption, 20,403 ; diarrhoea, 17,389; Carolina in describing his return journey says:

debility, 14,500; rheumatism, 11,799; heart disease, 10,

636. Of the Union forces 29,725.died in prison. Taking train again at Greensboro', after one day's tarrying, we came back to Richmond and to Ashland, the seat of

The size of the great.“estates": of the English nobility is Randolph-Macon College. Here others of the family having hardly imagined in this country. The. Beaufort family probeen męt, we proceeded in two vehicles nine miles westward perty in Monmouthshire,-in England, but lying on the Welsh to Ground Squirrel bridge over the South Anna River, lying border, so that they are almost considered part of Wales,-is along which was the plantation known as Shrubbery Hill,' offered for sale by the Duke of Beaufort's eldest son, the the. one time possession of my wife's grandfather, Nathaniel Marquis of Worcester. They make 26,000 acres, and the C. Crenshaw. A new purchaser had occupied the substantial "rent-roll” is $150,000 a year. Included in the sale are square brick mansion only two months before, and we were eight castles, among them Monmouth, where Henry V was glad to see that he was putting it in fair order throughout, and born ; Usk, where Edward IV and Richard III were born : mending the fences near the house and repairing the outbuild- Chepstow, Raglan, Striguil, and Grosmont, besides the ruins ings. The deep indentation in the side of a door, showing of Tintern abbey and the manorial rights over King Arthur's the mark of a bullet aimed at Friend C. in the exciting times Caerleon. before the war (he had freed all the slaves left to him, and se- The ruins of Tintern abbey are regarded as among the cured the freedom of many others) had been left undisturbed. most interesting and beautiful in Great Britain, and WordsThe family graveyard in a field a furlong away was visited. worth's poem on them is an English classic. Sixty years and more ago there was quite a community of Friends hereabout, who attended Cedar Creek Meeting. The Deaths due to the war are chronicled daily. Eben Brewer, old building has been kept in fair repair, but meetings are no United States postal inspector, in charge of the mail service in longer regularly held there.

Cuba, died at Siboney, on the 14th instant, of yellow' fever,

after a short illness. He was a well-known and much-reWatering with a Rake.

spected man; a journalist, and was for some years in Phila

delphia, going then to Erie, Pa., and from there to the Pacific PROFESSOR H. L. Bailey, in one of his instruction sheets

Coast... One of the officers of the war-ship Maine, Lieutenant intended for use in schools, has this to say about watering a

John J. Blandin, who was.“watch officer" at the time of the garden:

explosion, died on the 16th at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt “I wonder if you have a watering pot? If you have, put insane hospital, in Baltimore. The nervous strain of that it where you cannot find it, for we are going to water this gar- disaster brought on a mental disorder, of which he died. den with a rake. We want you to learn in this little garden, John B. Scott, of Philadelphia, a young man, graduate of the first great lesson in farming-how.to save the water in the

Wesleyan University; Conn., and for three years a medical soil. If you learn that much this summer you will know more

student at the University of Pennsylvania, died at his home than many old farmers do. You know that the soil is moist on the 15th instant, of rapid consumption, contracted on the in the spring when you plant the seeds. Where does this

cruiser St. Paul.'! moisture go to ? It dries up-goes off into the air. could cover up the soil with something we would prevent the The distressing condition of things under the tropical moisture from drying up. Let us cover it with a thin layer of

rains at Santiago is described by a dispatch from Juragua Joose, dry earth. We will make this covering by raking the bed

(Siboney) on the 16th. It says : “ The daily downpour of every few days-once a week anyway, and oftener than that rain last week renders the camp very uncomfortable. The if the top of the soil becomes hard and crusty, as it does

rifle pits and tents and the ground are soaked with water, and after a rain.' Instead of pouring water on the bed, therefore, the miserable yellow clay of the Cuban coast makes marching we will keep the moisture in the bed.

almost an impossibility. The narrow trail from Juragua to “If, however, the soil becomes so dry in spite of you, that

the front is cut to pieces by a constant stream of wagons, and the plants do not thrive, then water the bed. Do not sprinkle it takes hours for a supply wagon, drawn by four starving, it, but water it. Wet it clear through at evening. Then in the exhausted horses, to make the twelve-mile trip. morning, when the surface begins to get dry, begin the raking " The troops look to be in good condition by daylight, but again to keep the water from getting away. Sprinkling the when the swift, tropical nights come down, damp and cloudy, plants every day or two is one of the surest ways to spoil with the men shivering miserably about the sputtering camp them.''

fires, or searching for dry places for their blankets, the great

mass of troops seem little like a victorious army.' NOTE AND COMMENT.

If the American soldiers escape from Cuba without great In a thoughtful and generally cogent article on “ Culture and

losses by disease, it will be occasion for thankfulness. The Conduct, one of our contemporaries, the Commonwealth unhealthfulness of the island for “unacclimated” people, (Baptist), Philadelphia, speaks of the contrast presented by at this season, is well known. The Philippine islands are

still worse. the two recent wrecks—the French liner, and the American

The following statement made concerning the

experience of Japanese troops illustrates the case : coaster--in respect to the saving of the women. In the for

When the war with China broke out Japan sent 5,000 mer instance one only escaped, in the latter all, and the soldiers to the Pescadores, islands certainly not more trying Commonwealth sees in this the difference in the respect paid to health than the Philippines. Thirty of these were killed to women by the “' Latin ” and by other nations, including

in fight, and exactly 1,050 were effective when the war was

The remainder had either died or been invalided home. Partly; we concede the point made, but we beg

And the Japanese soldier is accustomed to an Eastern summer leave to ask our neighbor whether it thinks upon reflection,

and Eastern food." the rule is so uniform, after all, and if so, then how it explains the inferior position which women are assigned in Germany EXAMINATIONS of recruits for the regular army at Chicago a Teutonic nation ?

tend to prove the medical claim of the existence of a “bicy

cle heart," or enlargement of this organ from excessive bicycle The losses of life in the Civil War, 1861-65 seem to be riding and “scorching:" Many applicants for enlistment forgotten. They were terrific in their proportions. In the have been rejected from this cause, and the examining physiUnion armies alone, the number of men killed in battle was cian makes the statement that the trouble is quite general 60,976; died of wounds, 35,957 ; died of disease, 183,464. among riders of the class which comes under his view. The grand total of these figures is 280,397. There were 224,- Scorchers” often smoke cigarettes to excess, also, and be306 others discharged for disability, wounds, and disease. tween the two practices physical degeneracy proceeds apace.

over.

our own.

CURRENT EVENTS. The City of Santiago, Cuba, was finally surrendered, after several days of negotiation, but no further fighting, on the 17th. At 9 a. m., the Spanish flag on the Morro Castle, at the entrance to the harbor, was lowered, and at noon the American flag was hoisted over the “palace" or

or civil-government building. The agreement reached was that all the Spanish forces under the commanding officer at Santiago, Gen. Toral, should surrender, and these include not only those at that place, but detachments at other points in Eastern Cuba, not engaged in the battles at Santiago. The whole force surrendered was estimated at 24,000. It is not yet certain that the distant detachments will come in and give themselves up.

It was agreed that the city, including the forts, should be given up, and that the officers and men, prisoners of war, should be sent to Spain. There was some delay over the question whether the soldiers should be permitted to retain their guns, but the government at Washington refused to concede this. The officers were to .retain their

side-arms,” (swords and pistols), and the men their “personal property.'

It is now disclosed by press dispatches from Santiago that there is a very unfriendly, and almost hostile, feeling between the Americau forces and the Cuban insurgents. Gen. Garcia refused Gen. Shafter's invitation to attend the ceremonies of the surrender of the city. A Washington dispatch, 19th inst., says the situation is such that the War Department authorities feel justified in their decision “to retain practically all of Shafter's army at Santiago." It is also added that the authorities realize “ that the present situation is full of difficulty, and the future is dark,” owing to the probable necessity of continuing a large army in Cuba. " It begins to appear that for some time to come, and even after the conquest of Cuba is complete, the United States must maintain there a military government in order to meet the responsibilities which it has assumed to the civilized world."

It was announced from Washington on the 18th instant, that the expedition to take the city of San Juan, Porto Rico, (and consequently the island of Porto Rico), would proceed immediately. General Miles, with some artillery and troops, sailed on that date from Siboney, Cuba, on the converted cruiser Yale for Porto Rico. He would be followed, it was stated, by an army of 30,000 men, which would leave from different American ports. Two brigades were embarked at Charleston, S. C., and two divisions in camp at Chicamauga would also go. “All the force at Tampa, 13,000 strong, embracing artillery, will be put aboard ship as rapidly as transports can be gotten there, and sent to reinforce the other troop."" None of the force that participated in the actual fighting at Santiago would be sent, it was said, to Porto Rico:

The Spanish troops laid down their arms, at 9 o'clock on the 17th. It was stated that they would be encamped outside the city limits, under guard, until they could be embarked for Spain. The United States Government has advertised for ships to take them. The refugees, non-combatants, who had left the city when it was threatened with bombardment; returned to the city, but it would appear that if kept from sťarv: ing they will have to be fed by the Red Cross Society; or by the United States. Government. A ship: loaded with Red Cross supplies, it was expected, would enter the harbor among the first ships. Commodore Schley, in command of the American blockading ships under. Admiral Sampson, entered the harbor and examined it. . The defenses did not appear to be so strong as had been supposed. It is stated that the American ships remaining on that part of the coast of Cuba will now go inside of the harbor at Santiago, as the season of severe storms in the West Indies is at hand.

THERE appears to be little change in the situation at Manila, but it is evidently a very difficult one. The Spanish still hold the city, and the insurgents, under Aguinaldo, are still besieging it. The second detachment of troops to reinforce Admiral Dewey has not yet arrived. At Washington “ it is thought” that the report of strained relations between Admiral Dewey and the German Admiral Von Diedrichs, who commands the German ships there, “is without foundation, but there is reason to think that the danger of collision has caused much anxiety to the Government. German officials in Berlin admit that differences of opinion between Admiral Dewey and Admiral Von Diedrichs, as to the right of searching war ships, have occurred, and add that Admiral Von Diedrichs refused to allow German war ships to be searched.

GENERAL SHAFTER, in an official dispatch, sąys that upon entering Santiago he discovered a perfect entanglement of defenses, and that fighting as the Spaniards did the first day, it would have cost 5,000 lives to have taken the city. This would suggest that Toral might have held out longer, but it is said on his behalf that his troops had little or no food, and that there were indications of mutiny among them.

It was

The appearance of yellow fever among the United States troops at Santiago was announced on the 14th inst. said that fourteen cases had been reported on the inth, and that "a number of additional cases" had occurred in the in-. tervening time. This caused evident alarm at Washington, and increased anxiety for the conclusion of the operations at Santiago. All action there since that time has been influenced by the appearance of the disease. , The medical men report it “ of an unusually mild type," and say the death rate is low. Dispatches sent on the 18th said that there were about three hundred cases. Among those ill with it are several of Clara Barton's " Red Cross assistants and nurses, and Clara Barton, in a dispatch, 18th, to New York, says: "All points are fever smitten. Do not send persons not immune for us to care for.''

WHILE the condition of the troops in the camps in this country is reported satisfactory," there are many cases of sickness, especially from typhoid fever. A dispatch from Chickamauga, on the 18th, reported thirty-five cases of typhoid in one regiment, (the 9th Pennsylvania), twenty-one of them being in one company from Wilkesbarre. Camp Alger, near Falls Church, Va., is so unhealthy, due probably to bad water supply, that the men are to be removed to a place not far away, Dunn Loring, where the water is good. A dispatch on the 18th says, “the prevalence of typhoid fever is the principal subject now engaging attention at Camp Alger. There are fifty-one cases at the Fort Myer hospital.

PRESIDENT McKINLEY, on the 18th instant, sent a long and detailed dispatch to General Shafter at Santiago, giving instructions as to the military administration to be established there. It was in the nature of a proclamation as well as an order, and declares our purpose not to make war on the inhabitants of Cuba, or any faction of them, but to protect them in their personal and religious rights. Minute directions to this general effect are given. The President signed an order establishing tariff rates on goods coming into Santiago, it being the minimum rate under the Spanish law. The Treasury Department has notified the principal collectors along

he Atlantic coast that they may now clear American or neutral vessels with supplies of provisions for Santiago.

In regard to the prospect of peace, there is a dearth of encouraging news. The disposition to fight still seems strong. A dispatch from Washington to the Philadelphia Ledger, on the 18th, says there is no talk there of peace. "The Administration has no reason whatever to believe that Spain is prepared to sue for peace at the present time, or that dynastic conditions existing in that country will permit overtures for a suspension of hostilities until Porto Rico is in our possession, and, possibly, not until Havana has been invested." The Spanish volunteers at Havana, the dispatch says, are not informed of the losses suffered by Spain, and want to fight. That city “is now most thoroughly defended by earthworks and intrenchments on all sides," and some food supplies have been received. With the rainy season on,

General Blanco believes that the capture of Havana by bombardment by the navy and assault of the army will be difficult if not impossible for months to come, and is anxious to maintain the honor of Spain by a protracted defence of the capital of the island.''

000,000.

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The first advances toward peace, it is said, “must come bushels. This will be the largest ever raised, the largest from Spain," and the dispatch quoted above says : “None heretofore being 1892, when it was 612,000,000 bushels. The such has yet been received, and the haste which is being yield last year, 1897, was but 428,000,000, and in 1896, 467,made on the part of this Government to forward the expedi

Unless the crops abroad should again fail, bread tion to Porto Rico, and the Eastern Squadron under Commo- cannot fail to be low, within a few months. dore Watson, to the Spanish coast, are indications that no

-The Delaware peach crop will again be very small. confidence is being placed in the reports from Paris and The estimate of the officials of the Delaware railroad of the London, that Sagasta's Ministry is about to plead for a cessa

quantity' to be shipped over their line is only 311,434 baskets. tion of hostilities and to ask for the terms of the United States

Last year was considered a poor year, yet the yield was upon the acceptance of which the war would terminate.'

about 1,000,000 baskets, and 1896 was another poor year,

but the crop reached the total of nearly 3,000,000 baskets. An organization, the "Anglo-American League,'' has been

Four or five years ago the crop reached upward of 9,000,000 formed in England to promote the most cordial and constant

baskets. co-operation between the British Empire and the United

-Admiral Cervera, and the other Spanish naval officers States. A meeting was held at Stafford House, London, on the 15th instant, presided over by the Duke of Sutherland, in

captured at Santiago, reached Annapolis from Portsmouth, behalf of the movement, and a resolution was adopted pre

N. H., on the 16th, and were taken to the United States

Naval Academy. Most of them gave their “ parole"—their senting the reasons for it.

written declaration of honor—not to escape, and are allowed

the freedom of the grounds. ..! Some of them were in bare A SPECIAL session of the Legislature of New York was

feet. Few were able to speak English.' held last week, meeting on the rith and adjourning on the 16th. It was called in order to pass a law to take away from

-In Deep River Quarlerly Meeting, N. C., Josiah W. the present police authorities of New York, who are “ Tam

Leeds notes, (in a letter to the Friend, Philadelphia), it apmany" Democrats, the power of appointing election officers,

peared by the sụmmary of the reports upon tobacco, that 149 and this law, with three others of comparative importance,

persons use, deal in, or cultivate the weed within the limits of was enacted under caucus orders of the Republican majority.

the quarterly meeting. Governor Black subsequently appointed Captain John McCul- - There are in the world 1,459 submarine cables, 1,441 of lagh, of New York city, (who was removed from his position which are laid along coasts and in rivers. The total length as Chief of Police, by Mayor Van Wyck), State Superinten- of cable is 162,928 miles. Of this length corporations own dent of Elections under the new law.

143,024 miles, and of the companies themselves 76 per cent. are managed in London.

-Rear Admiral Sampson arrived in Santiago, on the 18th NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.

instant, and it is said, claimed the steamers in the harbor as The national convention of the Christian Endeavor organiza- | prizes of the navy. General Shafter, however, says that the tion, held this year at Nashville, Tenn., closed on the evening steamers were surrendered to him. of the ith inst. The attendance was comparatively small, - Professor Clement L. Smith, of Harvard, has been but the convention is said to have been very satisfactory. A

elected President of the American Philological Association, at quiet hour" each day was a special feature, aside from the

its meeting which has just been held in Hartford. Professor regular sessions, and was well attended ; at this service on the Herbert Weir Smyth, of Bryn Mawr College, is secretary and closing day, more than a thousand persons enrolled themselves as Comrades of the Quiet Hour. '

-Troops at Tampa, Florida, who do not go to Porto Rico, - The Railway Age estimates that the construction of

will be sent to a new camp at Fernandina on account of the railroads in the United States during 1898 will exceed that of prevalence of “malarial fever" at Tampa. 1897 by a thousand miles. The amount spent in construction

-- The postal authorities have arranged to fumigate all this year, it says, will not be less than fifty million dollars,

mail leaving Santiago, as a precaution against the spread of and it may reach sixty million. At the present time work is

yellow fever. in progress on about ninety roads, aggregating 2,725 miles.

- The tolls and other charges for the passage of Admiral -Estimates of the wheat crop of 1898 in the United

Camara's fleet both ways through the Suez Canal are said to States are now as high as 675,000,000 or possibly 700,000,000

have amounted to $116,000.

treasurer.

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We are satisfied with small profits.

It brings us many sales.

***A meeting under the care of the Committee on Education of New York Yearly Meeting will be held at 2.30 p m., Seventh month 30, (after Westbury Quarterly Meeting), at Westbury, L. I.

The meeting will be addressed by the President of Swarthmore College, William W. B.rdsall. It is expected that Helen Magill White will also be present. All interested are invited to be present.

WM. M. JACKSON, Clerk.

WATCHES.
As one of the oldest houses in the watch
trade established three generations ago-aud
up to date in every feature of the business, we
are able to offer the best and most serviceable
watches for the least money.

Give us a call.
GEO. C. CHILD,
1020 Chestnut St.–2d Floor.
Established 1810 at 824 North Second Street.

Some members of New York Yearly Meeting's Visiting Committee expect to visit in Seventh month the following meetings : 24. Purchase and Westbury.

JOSEPH T. MODOWELL, Clerk

WALL PAPER of

Attractive Styles
Popular Prices
Samples Free to any Address

A. L. Diament & Co.,
1624 Chestnut St.

Philadelphia, Pa.

These would be $12 Serge Suits at most stores. They are $7.50 here because we want to help business along in dull season-keep our good hands employed.

They came to us at a very low figure. We're selling them at practically no profit.

Crash Suits $5. These suits are not made by dressmakers, but by our regular tailors. Collars are hand - padded and shaped the same as in a cloth coat. Many other such details make them shapely and stylish.

E. O. THOMPSON'S SONS,

Our prices are the lowest, our
variety the most complete, and

a price catalogue for comparison ?

No liquors or other offensive goods or methods resorted to.

1311 Market Street.

Hanscoms'.
quality as near perfect as can be had. Shall we mail you Carpetings, Linoleum,

Window Shades, etc.

1338 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA. PA.

The Right Shoe for

You is the

Best Shoe Benjamin Green,

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YOUNG FRIENDS' ASSOCIATION ROOMS,

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We have the Best $3, $4, and $5
Spring and Summer Shoes.
S. F. Balderston's Son

UNDERTAKER
Samuel Dutcher, 45 N. 13th St.

WALL PAPERS

and EMBALMER All Grades.

New Styles for Spring.
Estimates Given.

ESTABLISHED 1860.
Window Shades Made to Order.

TELEPHONE 5807.
140 North Fifteenth Street,
902 Spring Garden St. Philadelphia, Penna.

No. 1313 Vine Street, will close for the summer on SEVENTH-DAY, SIXTH MONTH 18th, 1898. Any communications regarding

PHILADELPHIA,
Association work should be addressed to

The Christiana Riot
ELIZA H. WORRELL,
1424 N. Bouvier Street, Philadelphia.

is a memorable event, owing to the

Ellwood Heacock.
persecution of Castner Hanway and other mem
bers of the Society of Friends.

The true story
Shoes

of this affair has been gathered and made into a

book by David R. Forbes, editor of the Quarry- CLEMENT A. WOODNUTT, Most desirable are our Summer

ville Sun. It is endorsed by such able critics as lines of Shoes, and at most tempting Joseph S. Walton, Hon. W. U. Hensel, and

Undertaker prices. many others. It is neatly printed on good paper,

and Embalmer, strongly bound in cloth, liberally illustrated, In the popular Oxford for Women we have and worth the money.

1728 GIRARD AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA. soft, cool and comfortable Shoes, black

PRICE, $1.00, POSTPAID.

Telephone 66-99-A. or tan, turned with a heavy mock welt

Address all orders to edge. The price is $2.50, but there's

MARVIN E. BUSHONG, $4.00 worth of looks, wear, and comfort.

Co.,

May P. O., Lancaster Co., Pa. Boys require pretty sturdy Shoes for the play of vacation time. We provide for

FOULKE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH them with a dark brown Shoe in Grain Taken at Reunion at Gwynedd, May 30. $1.00.

23 North 13th Street (above Market) Photograph of Edward Foulke's House. Stock, made to stand wear. No use to

J.. MITCHELL ELLIOT,

613 Walnut Street. pay more when these may be had in

West Chelten Avenue, Germantown.

Law and Conveyancing

PHILADELPHIA. sizes 2% to 6 for $2.25, and in 11 to 2 H. L. ROBERTS & CO., 15 S. 13th St., Philad'a.

sizes for $2.00. We are cleaning up our odds and ends in

Nearly 1000 copies sold in London within a few weeks after issue.
Women's, Misses', & Children's Shoes.
It would pay you to look at them,
Women's High Shoes, $1.50. Misses
and Children's Shoes, $1.00.

An American Story by Richard H. Thomas, M. D.
Author of " Echoes and Pictures, “A History of the Society of Friends in

America,” etc. Preface by W. C. Braithwaite, B.A., LL.B.
Mail orders receive prompt and accurate

Five original full-page illustrations. attention.

“ Thestory is intended to portray home life among the Society of Friends in the Eastern Middle States,

in its influence upon a serious minded man, fresh from the New York world and agnostic in his faith. Address Orders to “Department C."

The Quaker setting and atmosphere of the book are painted from the life; so also are the characters; and the account of the hero's growth into spiritual life is derived from actual acquaintance with similar experiences. I feel sure that all who read the following pages will be grateful to the author for having intro

duced them to the lives of plain living and holy thinking which he has described."-William Charles Strawbridge & Clothier, Braithwaite, in the Preface to Penelve."

All who read the book will be struck by a high quality in it, too often absent from the of ordinary PHILADELPHIA.

fiction ; their interest will be aroused and maintained in the tale, and it will give them a clear picture of home life among American Friends.

Readers of Penelve' cannot fail to be impressed by the ex

ample given in this story of the powerful influence for good which true Quakerism must always exert on Please mention FRIENDS' INTEL- life and character."--The British Friend.

360 pages, 8vo. Handsomely bound in cloth. Price, $1.25, postage paid. LIGENCER, when answering Advertise

JOHN C. WINSTON & CO., Publishers, ments in it. This is of value to us 718 Arch Street,

Philadelphia, Pa. and to the advertisers.

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YEO & LUKENS, STATIONERY • BLANK BOOKS • PRINTING

.50,

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PENELVE: or Among the Quakers.

pages

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THE GUARDIAN TRUST AND DEPOSIT CO.

etc.

No. 7 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md. This Company does a General Trust and Banking Business. Interest allowed on Deposits. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee (executing Trusts of every kind), Receiver, Guardian, etc. Interests

or Dividends Collected, Real Estate managed for residents or non-residents, etc., President,

Vice-Presidents,

Secretary and Treasurer. JOHN L. Blake. DANIEL MILLER and JONATHAN K. Taylor. WILLIAM M. BYRN. Executive Committee :

SWm. H. Bosley, Chairman, Henry C. Matthews, Daniel Miller, George K. McGaw,

Franeis A. White, Matthew C. Fenton, Basil B. Gordon.

The Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia
409 Chestnut St.

Capital, $1,000,000, Fully Paid.
INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMIN-

ISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.
All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the assets of the Company.
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY; Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN; Vice-President and Actuary,
ASA S. WING ; Manager of Ínsurance Department, JOSEPH ASHBROOKE; Trust Officer,
J. ROBERTS FOULKE; Assistant Trust Officer, J. BARTON TOWNSEND ;

Assistant Actuary, DAVID G. ALSOP.

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PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OF PHILADELPHIA.
This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS OF LIFE AND ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at
actual NET Cost. It is PURELY MUTUAL; has ASSETS OF THIRTY MILLIONS, and a SUR-
PLUS of over 342 MILLIONS. ITS POLICIES ARE NON-FORFEITABLE AND INCONTESTABLE.
President,

Vice-President,

Secretary and Treasurer, HARRY F. WEST, GEORGE K. JOHNSON. HENRY C. BROWN.

J. T. JACKSON & CO., Real Estate Brokers,

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No. 711 WALNUT ST., PHILA.

CAPITAL, $1,000,000
SURPLUS, $2,000,000

THE GIRARD

TRUST CO.

Rents, Sales, Mortgages, etc., etc.

LIFE INSURANCE,

ANNUITY, AND

EASTERN NEBRASKA INVESTMENTS.

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Long or Short Time.
Netting 6 per ct. Interest. With Perfect Security.

Collection of interest and principal attended to without
cost to investor. Correspondence invited.
BANK OF MUNROE, Munroe, Platte Co., Neb.
Joseph WEBSTER,

WM. WEBSTER,
President.

Cashier.

PETER WRIGHT & SONS

OFFICERS:
EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS, President.

HENRY TATNALL, Vice-President.
WM. NEWBOLD ELY, Treas. and Sec’y.

N. B. CRENSHAW, Real Estate Officer.
EDW. SYDENHAM PAGE, Ass't Sec'y.

A. A. JACKSON, Ass't to Pres. and Vice-Pres. CHARLES JAMES RHOADS, Ass't Treas.

WM. Ě. AUMONT, Manager Trust Dept.
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM, Solicitor.

MANAGERS:
EFFINGHAM B. Morris,
WILLIAM H. JENKS,

Geo. H. MCFADDEN,
JOHN A. BROWN, Jr.,
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM,

HENRY TATNALL,
BENJAMIN W. RICHARDS,
WILLIAM H. GAW,

ISAAC H. CLOTHIER,
John B. GARRETT,
FRANCIS I. GOWEN,

John C. SIMS,
PEMBERTON S. HUTCHINSON,

JOSIAH M. BACON.
BROAD AND CHESTNUT STREETS

305-307 WALNUT ST., PHILAD'A. LETTERS OF CREDIT for Travelers.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE bought and sold. The purchase and sale of Prime Investment Securities a Specialty

Loans negotiated on Real Estate. Interest allowed on deposits.

Merchants' Trust Company, PHILADELPHIA & READING RAILWAY.

AQUILA J. LINVILL,
Dealer in Choice Lehigh Coal,

1827 North 10th Street, Philadelphia.

John C. Hancock & Co.,

N. W. Cor. 9th and Master Sts.

(P. & R. R. R.)

DEALERS IN BEST GRADES OF

LEHIGH AND COAL FREE BURNING

611-613 CHESTNUT STREET.

ANTHRACITE COAL. NO SMOKE. CAPITAL (subscribed),

$500,000.00 CAPITAL (paid in), .

250,000.00

NO CINDERS. DOUBLE TRACKED. SURPLUS,

50,000.00 UNDIVIDED PROFITS, :

HEAVY STEEL RAILS. STONE

30,094.49 Interest allowed on Deposits. Titles to Real Estate

BALLASTED.
insured, and conveyancing done. Loans made on Mort-
gage and Approved Collateral. Surety entered for Ad-
ministrators and others. The Company also acts as
Administrator, Guardian, Trustee, etc. Safe Deposit Royal Blue Line to New York.
Boxes to rent from $2 and upwards, per annum.

SWIFTEST AND SAFEST TRAINS
JOSEPH R. RHOADS, President,
JOHN F. LEWIS, Vice-President.

IN THE WORLD.
ROBERT MORRIS EARLY, Sec. and Treas.
WM. B. LANE, Title and Trust Officer.
DIRECTORS

Scenic Reading Route to
NICHOLAS BRICE,

EDWARD S. SAYRES, Spencer M. JANNEY, 1. BOLTON WINPENNY,

READING, HARRISBURG, GETTYSS. DAVIS PAGE,

ELLWOOD BECKER, Joseph R. RHOADS, EDWIN S. Dixon,

BURG, CHAMBERSBURG, SHAMO-
JOHN F. LEWIS,

WARREN G. GRIFFITH,
THOMAS R. GILL,
SAMUEL BANCROFT, JR.,

KIN, WILLIAMSPORT, AND POINTS
CHAS, S. HINCHMAN,
EDWARD G. McCollin,

Harriet WERIOR PENNSYLVANIA.
ALFRED I. PHILLIPS.

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TELEPHONE

AND COMFORT.

SAFETY AND

PIROMM & KINDIG, Successors to D. S. WILTBERGER.

Residence, 216 W. Coulter St.

SPEED.

1-42-25-D.

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