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MOVEMENTS IN THE RELIGIOUS FIELD. At the meeting of the New York Presbytery, in New York, on the rith inst., a letter from Dr. Charles A. Briggs was read, withdrawing from the Presbyterian Church.

The resignation was accepted. Dr. Briggs's letter was, in part, as follows:

After long and careful reflection, I have decided to sever my connection with the Presbytery of New York, and more especially with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. I withhold the reasons for this decision in the interests of peace and quietness. I may simply say that I have remained under your jurisdiction as long as I could do so with a good conscience. I desire to act in all charity toward all my brethren, and, so far as possible, relieve them froin responsibility for my action.'

President Hall, of the Union Theological Seminary, says that Dr. Briggs will continue to hold his professorship in the seminary, as there is nothing in his entering into another branch of the Christian communion to prevent his performing his duties as Professor of Biblical Theology.

CURRENT EVENTS. The two Houses of Congress, late on the night of the 18th, agreed on resolutions concerning Cuba, in response to the President's Message. They are as follows :

First. That the people of the Island of Cuba are, and of right ought to be, free and independent.

Second. That it is the duty of the United States to demand, and the Government of the United States does hereby demand that the Government of Spain at once relinquish its authority and government in the Island of Cuba, and withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters.

Third. That the President of the United States be, and he hereby is, directed and empowered to use the entire land and naval forces of the United States and to call into the actual service of the United States the militia of the several States to such extentas may be necessary to carry these resolutions into effect.

Fourth. That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island, except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination when that is accomplished to leave the government and control of the island to its people.

The Unitarian body has made for some time past a decided, though slow, growth. The Christian Register, Boston, in a recent issue, has this paragraph :

A correspondent reports that a Western revivalist is prophesying the death of Unitarianism, and asserting that there are seven fewer Unitarian churches in the United States than there were ten years ago. He wishes us to publish the facts in the case. The facts are not important, and nothing to boast of. Indeed, we are ashamed to say that the gain of churches in that time has been only about one hundred and twenty-five."

In the passage of the resolutions, the Senate and House differed as to their wording, the former, by a vote of 51 to 37, on the 16th inst., having adopted a clause “recognizing” the present insurrectionary organization in Cuba as a free and independent government. The House, on the 18th, by a vote of 179 to 156, refused to agree to this, and it required several hours of conference by committees to adjust the difference, the Senate finally yielding the recognition clause. In the first resolution, as above, the House also desired to strike out the words are and," after “.

after “Cuba, but this the Senate conferees would not yield. In the non-recognition of the present Cuban Republic the policy of President McKinley was followed, the Republicans of the House voting with a few exceptions on that side, under the leadership of Speaker Reed. Representative Henry U. Johnson, of the Richmond district of Indiana, opposed any resolutions looking toward war, and so voted.

men

The pro

A "BURNING QUESTION

in the Methodist Church, for several years, has been that of equal representation of “lay

with ministers in the annual conferences. These conferences are now composed only of the ministers. posal to establish equal representation has failed in previous years, but this year the measure shows greatly increased support, and is now sure of adoption. It requires a three-fourths affirmative support, and as the votes cast now are entirely those of the ministers, it shows how the influence of the laymen—the non-ministers—is growing.

It seeins that there is still some disposition to impeach san Maclaren,” (John Watson), on the ground that he is unsound in doctrine, according to the Presbyterian standards. Dr. Kennedy Moore, who was prominent in last year's attack, has notified the Presbytery of South London that he will inove at its next meeting to transmit to the Synod, which meets at Liverpool, on the 25th inst., an overture complaining of the heresy in Dr. Watson's work, “The Mind of the Master,'' and praying the Synod to take steps

" to vindicate the honor and faith of the church."

PRESIDENT MCKINLEY signed the resolutions of Congress on the afternoon of the 19th inst., and their text was cabled to Minister Woodford, at Madrid, with instructions to notify the Spanish Ministry of their purport, and at the same time to demand that the military and naval forces of Spain shall be withdrawn at once from Cuba and Cuban waters. The Spanish Government is requested to make formal answer to this demand before 12 o'clock noon, Washington time, on the 23d instant. It is expected that the Spanish Government will at once refuse, and that a military movement will then be begun by the United States.

were

The Cortes (Parliament) of Spain met at Madrid on the 20th instant. Senor Sagasta, the head of the Government, made an address to the members of his party, the previous day. He declared that Spain would not consent to the loss of any of her territory, and that “acts, not words, now called for. On receipt of word from Washington of the war resolutions by Congress, the Spanish Foreign Minister sent to the Spanish 'ambassadors at the capitals of other countries, a memorandum to submit to the foreign Governments "setting forth the grievances of Spain, showing all Spain has done to avoid war, and saying the responsibility for war rests entirely upon the United States.

The question has been asked “When, where, and by w.hoin was the first Sunday-school work permanently begun in America ?” To whic's the answer has been given : “ There are many claimants for the credit of introducing the modern Sunday-school into the United States. The facts, so far as they are known, are given in detail by H. Clay Trumbull's * Yale Lectures on the Sunday-school' (pp. 122, 123). It is known, for example, that in 1786 a Sunday-school was organized, under the direction of Bishop Asbury, at the house of Thomas Crenshaw, in Hanover county, Virginia. Little, however, is known of that school save its beginning. In February, 1790, the Methodist Conference in Charleston, S. C., favored organizing Sunday-schools ; but no record is known of any schools founded as a result of this favorable action. In January, 1791, the First-day, or Sunday-school, Society was formed.

In 1816 and 1817, local unions for Sundayschool work were organized in New York and Boston and Philadelphia. These unions became the nucleus of the American Sunday-school Union, a national society, organized in 1824.”

PREPARATIONS for war have been pushed forward without abatement of haste or expenditure. The four large steamships of the American Line, the St. Paul, St. Louis, Paris, and New York, have all been purchased by the Government, and will be converted into "cruisers.

cruisers." Nearly the whole of the regular army is being concentrated in the South, on or near the Gulf coast. It is expected that the President will call for 60,000 volunteers, and will also call into service the militia of the different States. A bill adding new taxes will be immediately passed by Congress, and it is said $100,000,000 new bonds are to be issued. The expenditure for war purposes promises to be very large.

An article in the Philadelphia Press, 19th inst., cautions was hardly appreciable, but in lower sections, where moisture its readers not to be too sanguine that the war now being accumulated, more harm was done.

In the northern parts of entered upon will be soon over," and is certain of success. the State very little injury was done because the buds were not It points out that the forts defending Havana may not be so sufficiently advanced. Dispatches from Chambersburg say easily “reduced” by the warships ; in the English attack on the peach orchards in that vicinity are all right, and that no Alexandria, the forts after the bombardment were still defen- peaches but the Globe and Crawford varieties have been sible. Cuba cannot be taken and held by a small force ; it affected. The South Mountain belt is also reported to be in a will require a large army.

Havana has a population of 200,- fair condition with promise of a large yield. ooo, and Santiago 71,000, while there are five other cities with 30,000 or more. The Spanish troops in the island are A SCION from the old “Penn Treaty" elm tree (which said to be 60,000. The Press does not mention the terribly stood on the bank of the Delaware River, at Kensington, at insalubrious climate at this season, which has been so fatal to the settlement of Philadelphia, and under which William Penn the Spanish soldiers.

is said to have held his peace treaty with the Indians in 1683),

was planted in 1896, in the grounds of the University of REPORTS received at the Department of Agriculture at Pennsylvania, and is growing vigorously. It was presented Harrisburg indicate a much less serious injury to the fruit for the purpose by Paul A. Oliver, of Wilkesbarre, Pa. The crop than had been at first indicated, by the recent cold Pennsylvania Forestry Association has now procured a brass weather. The effect of the freezing was very irregular in its tablet which will be placed by the tree on Arbor Day, (22nd effects on blossoms. In the higher elevations the damage inst.), with this inscription : "Scion of the Penn Treaty Elm,

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A RECENT magazine article says that

Don't spend SO

much 500,000 men, with the aid of machinery, now do the work which a few years ago money on lamp-chimneys — required the labor of 16,000,000.

get Macbeth's--get the chimLITTLE MARGARET, gazing at a water

ney made for your lamp.
fall, exclaimed : Mamma, the water is
coming downstairs. It can't find the The Index tells.
steps, so it is just sliding !”- Youth's

Write Macbeth Pittsburgh Pa
Companion. .
FRANKLIN MILLE

A GENTLEMAN observed his little son
FINE FLOUR

attentively studying a map of the world.
ENTIREWHEAT
What place are you looking for, Willie ?”

You need them for your
he inquired. The small boy knit his

country home.
brow, and traveled a circuitous route with
THE

his forefinger before he answered earnestly, You want good, safe lamps, and securely

Twyin' to find Christendom.''
A STORY of the late English physician, Avail yourselves of our experience.

put up. We make no charge for this.
Sir Benjamin Ward Richardson, famous
for his advocacy of temperance, tells how
he had been on a visit to one of the three

A. J. Weidener,
or four small towns in England which
have no public house. Although there

36 S. Second Street, were four thousand people there, the doc

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA.
THE FRANKLIN MILLS FINE
FLOUR of the Entire Wheat is the whole

One day a

tor was nearly starving. Wheat just as nature made it, with the in- young medical man came to Sir Benjamin nutritious wood husk removed. It is far superior to anything in the line of flour yet pro- for advice as to taking the practice ; and

HOW TO BUILD A duced andis heartily endorsed by the medical profession.

Sir Benjamin, placing his hands on the It is not a "fad” flour but is sensible, being based on correct bygienic principles. It has young doctor's shoulders, said : " Take

SILO come to stay because it will stand the tes of time. If not sold by your grocer. Write us.

my advice, and don't. Those wretched Made only by the

teetotalers not only shirk accidents, but, FRANKLIN MILLS CO., LOCKPORT, N.Y. when wounded, heal so fast that there is

E. F. Schlichter, neither pleasure nor profit after the first dressing.'-Westminster Gazette.

321 Vine Street,

PHILADELPHIA. MCCLEES GALLERIES

WILLIAM B. PAXSON.

MAHLON B. PAXSON.
J. E. McCLEES & Co., Ltd.
Members of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange.

WANTED
FREDERICK PAXSON & CO.,

I desire to make copies of the Manuscript “Extracts”

of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, between the years 1708 Stock and Bond Brokers,

and 1748, both inclusive.

A few of them I already have, as follows:
112 Custom House Place, Philad’a.

1709
1722

1738
Picture Dealers.
Orders and inquiries by mail or wire receive prompt

1727 Frame Mauritiacturera.

1732

1746 OLD PRINTS

1715

1737

All the others I am desirous to obtain. MAKING albums or illustrating books acquires a

WATCHES.

These “Extracts” are no doubt in existence, somenew charm when you have discovered the great col

where. Will not those in charge of collections of such lection of the Soule PHOTOGRAPH Co., of Boston, for

As one of the oldest houses in the watch old documents look them over? I will take the best poswhich we are agents in Philadelphia. Scenes of travel in trade established three generations ago—and sible care of any handed me, and return them with little all countries; castles, cathedrals, and cities of Europe;

.

HOWARD M. JENKINS, portraits of royalty and celebrities of all times, past and up to date in every feature of the business, we

921 Arch Street, Philadelphia. present; reproductions of famous art works, old and new;

are able to offer the best and most serviceable these are a part only. With such a collection to draw watches for the least money.

Give us a call. upon, illustrating becomes an absorbing pleasure.

GEO. C. CHILD,

M. L. PHILIBERT, NEW ART PUBLICATIONS. 1020 Chestnut St.-2d Floor.'

FRENCH Established 1810 at 824 North Second Street. “Where Shakespeare Sleeps,''-Anne Hatha way's Cottage, by James Fagin.

STEAM DYER, SCOURER, AND DRY CLEANER Springtime of Love,"' by Virnea, (companPlease mention FRIENDS' INTEL

210 S. Eighth St., Philadelphia. ion to " Love's Dream.") LIGENCER, when answering Adver

Branch Office, 727 S. Second Street. FREE ART EXHIBITION of Mr. Anderson's

tisements in it. This is of value to Cleaning of Blankets and Lace Curtains a specialty paintings in oil and water colors, in our Art Gallery.

us and to the advertisers.

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ASK

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PHILADELPHIA.

• 1518 CHESTNUT ST.

1744

1711
1712

attention.

1747

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furnished by General P. A. Oliver, and planted for the Penn sylvania Forestry Association by Governor Daniel H. Hastings, April 10, 1896.'

NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.

It is stated that the remains of Frances E. Willard were cremated on the 9th instant at Graceland, near Chicago. Such a procedure, it is stated, was in accordance with her wish, frequently expressed. On the following day the ashes were taken to Rosehill Cemetery and interred in the Willard family lot. Great secrecy was maintained as to the cremation and very few people had any knowledge of it.

This was done to avoid the attraction of curious crowds of people.

-The New York Board of Education has made up its "budget." for the year. It includes the expenses of the public school education in all five boroughs of the city. The total cost of public education in Greater New York, this year, will be $10,009, 189, of which more than half is for the schools in the boroughs of Manhattan and Bronx. Brooklyn gets $3,026,939. Of the total $10,000,000, $6,522,936 is for salaries of teachers. In addition to ordinary expenses, the Commissioners also voted to ask for $4,389,000 for new schools in Manhattan, and $1,000,000 for new schools in Brooklyn, so that the grand total demanded is $15,398,189.

-An English paper says that the other day, when Queen Victoria was seated in her drawing-room, with several of her household in attendance, the lamp placed close beside her

began to smoke. To the horror and astonishment of the com-
pany, the Queen promptly raised her august hand and turned
down the flame. Your Majesty,” said the lady-in-waiting,
in awestruck tones, “why did you trouble to do that your-
self ?" Because," said the Queen, “if I had called out,
· This lamp is smoking !' one of you ladies would have said
to the equerry, 'See ! the lamp is smoking !' and the equerry
would have called out to the nearest servant, 'Here ! the
Queen's lamp is smoking !' and the servant would have
called to a footman to attend to it, and all the time the lamp
would have gone on smoking ; so I preferred to turn it down
myself."

- The United States Supreme Court has affirmed the constitutionality of the act of the New York Legislature of 1895, prohibiting persons who have been convicted of and

punished for a crime from practicing medicine in the State. The Court has also sustained the constitutionality of the Civil Service law of the State of Illinois.

-The Voice says the farmers of Ohio “are beginning to realize more than ever before what drink costs the hard-working tax-payer who never drinks. Farmers' institutes this winter have paid much attention to the subject and the result is a marked increase of Prohibition interest.'

--The reindeer relief and exploring expedition in Alaska has been pronounced a failure, the animals proving useless for the purpose intended, and the Government has recalled Captain Brainerd.

ARMS
ARMSTRONG & MCKELVY

L'ilisu.gu.
BEYMER-BAUMAN

Pit burgh.

Pittsburgh. FAHNESTOCK

Pittsburgh. ANCHOR

Cincinnati, ECKSTEIN

ATLANTIC

BRADLEY

10 a. m.

BROOKLYN

New York.

JEWETT

at 10 a. m.

ULSTER

UNION

IO a. m.

SOUTHERN

Chicago.

SHIPMAN

10 a. m.

COLLIEE

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OTWITHSTANDING the extrava

NOTICES.

*** The Committee on Philanthropic Labor of DAVIS -CHAMBERS gant assertions of the manufacturers

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends will meet in the meeting-house, 15th and Race streets,

Philadelphia, Seventh-day, Fourth month 30, making White Lead by quick pro- 1898, at 1.30 o'clock p. m.

The Sub Committees meeting as follows: cess, comparative painting tests, carefully

The Indian, in Room No. 2 at io a. m.

Peace and Arbitration, in Room No. 3, at and honestly made, show that Pure White

Colored People, Race Street meeting-house Lead made by the “old Dutch process Improper Publications, in Room No 4, at

will cover more surface and cover it better Purity, in Room No 3, at 9 a. m., }

Women and Children, in Room No. 5, at than White Lead made by the quick or so

Temperance and Tobacco, in Room No. 1, at called oo up-to-date" process.

Educational and Publication Committee, in

Room No I, at 9.30 a. m. SOUTHERN

Legislation Committe”, in Race Street Parlor, JOHN T. LEWIS & BROS CO

By using National Lead Co.'s Pure White Lead Tinting Colors,
Philadelphiu.

any desired shade is readily obtained. Pamphlet giving valu-
MORLEY
Cleveland.

able information and card showing samples of colors free; also SALEM

Salem, Mass. folder showing picture of house painted in different designs or various styles or CORNELL Buffalo. combinations of shades forwarded upon application to those intending to paint.

*** Mary B. Paxson (829 N. Broad street, Philadelphia), desires, on behalf of the workers in the Beech Street Mission, to thank those who have been forwarding to her periodicals for the

use of the Mission. This is now closed for the A GOOD INVESTMENT.

summer, and she asks that those who have been

so kindly sending on their papers for the use of One of the safest of all investments is the bond of a good Pennsylvania water company. the boys will now cease to send them to her Recent decisions of our Supreme Court have determined that when a town has given such a

until the Mission is reopened in the autumn. company the right to supply the town with water, the franchise cannot be withdrawn, except for good cause.

* The Westbury Quarterly Meeting's Phil. The Muncy Water Supply Company, of Muncy, Lycoming Co., has just issued First Mortgage anthropic Committee will hold a public meeting Gold Bonds, to run forty years, which are now offered for sale to investors at par and accrued in the meeting house, Rutherfurd Place and interest from April ist.

Fifteenth street, New York, on Seventh day, They pay FIVE per cent. interest. They are free from State Tax.

the 23d, at 3 p. m. Interest paid in Philadelphia at the office of the City Trust Company, 927 Chestnut Street. Albert R. Lawton will read a paper on the

The present revenues of the Company, with about 400 more houses yet to be supplied with subject of “ Capital Punishment.' warer, are sufficient to pay all expenses, including interest on the bonds, and still leave a surplus.

HARRY A. HAWKINS, A Sinking Fund has been provided sufficient to pay off all the bonds at maturity, or purchase any

MARY W. ALBERTSON,Clerks, that may be offered before maturity, at a price not exceeding 105 and interest.

The bonds are in denominations of $500 and $1,000; they are either coupon or registered, The semi annual meeting of Bucks Firstas preferred.

day School Union will be held at Friends' This is an excellent opportunity for a safe, profitable, and convenient investment.

meeting-house, Bristol, Pa., Seventh day, Fourth

month 23, 1898, at 10.30 a. A cordial WILLIAM P. HUSTON,

invitation is extended. 103 Girard Building, Philadelphia.

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mattresses.

p. m.

Subject,"

YEO & LUKENS,
PRINTING | { sizes, in light gray

, dark gray, browns

,

*** A Circular Meeting, under the care of a *** Quarterly Meetings in Fourth month are JOSIAH G. WILLIAMS, Committee of Concord Quarterly Meeting, will as follows:

No. 13 N. Eleventh Street, near Market, be held at Chichester, on First day, the Ist of 19 Western, Londongrove, Pa.

PHILADELPHIA. Fifth month. 21. Caln, Sadsbury, Pa.

(Formerly of 1027 Market Street.) To convene at 3 o'clock.

23. New York, Brooklyn, N. Y.
MARY P. HARVEY, Clerk.
25. Nebraska, H. Y. M., Lincoln, Neb.

In the spring the housewife's thoughts turn to the reno26. Concord, Wilmington, Del.

vating of things. This is where my long experience and * Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting's Phil- 27. Purchase, Amawalk, N. Y.

training enable me to be of help. I will re-upholster your anthropic Committee, believing that much good

furniture, and can make it look as well, sometimes better, 30. Scipio, Scipio, N. Y.

than when it was new. I make and hang curtains and was done last year by an organization called the Philadelphia Vacant Lots Committee, which *** Abington First-day School Union will be draperies of all kinds, and awnings. work to many unemployed, and wishing to held in Friends meeting-house Norristown, Pa.,

And I charge only moderate prices. gave

Brass and enameled bedsteads are coming to be greater help them this year, would ask that any Friend Seventh-day Fourth month 16, 1898. who has or knows of any vacant lot that the

MARY H. FORMAN, Clerk.

favorites every year. They are very handsome and conCommittee might be able to use, would report

JOSEPH S. EVANS, Asst. Clerk.

venient—but that's only part of the reason. They're the same to the Chairman, who will furnish

clean--they're safe; there's no room for doubts and susfurther information. We hope this appeal will

picions. PERFECTION.

PROMPTNESS be answered by those having the information we

It's a wise housekeeper who knows what is in her own desire in regard to lots either in the city or

FRENCH METHOD LAUNDRY, mattresses. I know, because it is all put in here in the country.

2103-05 Columbia Ave., Phila.

building, under my own eye; I don't sell factory-made REMODELED.

NEW MANAGEMENT. JOSEPH F. SCULL, Chairman of Committee,

To make sure, rip open an unexpected Excellent work. Prices moderate. Goods called for 1438 N. 17th St. ,Phila.

corner,

if you like, and peep in. and delivered promptly.

Come and see the new styles, and get prices,

JOHN S. CONRAD. * A Conference under the care of the Philanthropic Committee of Philadelphia Yearly and Bucks Quarterly Meetings will be held in the

S. F. Balderston's Son meeting house at Makefield, Bucks county, Pa.,

WALL PAPERS on First-day, Fourth month 24, 1898, at 2.30

New Styles for Spring.

Spring and Summer
The meeting will be addressed by Joseph All Grades.

Estimates Given.
S. Walton
Temperance and To.

Shawls bacco.' All interested are respectfully invited

Window Shades Made to Order. to attend. 002 Spring Garden St. Philadelphia, Penna.

Special Offerings in Shawls On behalf of Committee,

suitable for Friends' wear. SUSANNA RICH, Clerk, Woodbourne, Pa

We closed out an importer's stock of

Plain Chudda Fine Wool Shawls, full *.* held in Friends' meeting-house at Hockessin,

and light shades of tan, also black. We Delaware, on Seventh day, Fourth month 23,

23 North 13th Street (above Market) at 10 a. m.

613 Walnut Street.

offer at $1,50 Shawls worth $3.00; at $2, All interested are cordially invited to attend. Law and Conveyancing

worth $3.50; at $2.50, worth $4; at $3.50, HORACE L DILWORTH, ) Clerks.

BLANKS.

PHILADELPHIA.

worth $5. ELLEN P. WAY,

Also a full assortment of Zephyr and The following compose the Committee to assist

Knit Shawls-
in securing homes for strangers in attendance at
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting :
Nature's

in White, at 75 cents, $1.00, $1.50, Charles E. Thomas, 868 N. 26th street.

$2.00, and $2.50. Tamar Hartley, 1511 Swain street. Remedy

in Gray, at $1.50 and $2.00. Martha D. Hough, 1340 Spruce street.

in Black, at $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, and Matilda K. Lobb, 1702 N. 18th street.

For the cure of all chronic and acute

$2.50. Sarah L. Haines, 1513 Marshall street.

diseases, a life-giving principle free Joseph M. Truman, Jr., 1500 Race street.

WATERPROOF CLOAKS, in ; Cravenette, Rebecca B. Comly, 1529 Centennial avenue.

from all drugs. Asthma, bronchitis, light weight, one cape, full made in every catarrh, consumption, headache, neu

way, suitable for traveling or rainy weather, *** Meetings to be visited by members of ralgia, rheumatism, nervous prostra

at $9.00. Special value. New York Yearly Meeting's Visiting Commit.

tion, and general debility cured by tee : FOURTH MONTH.

inhaling

Write for our Linen Catalogue. 24. Flushing. JOSEPH T. McDowell, Clerk.

Mail Orders receive prompt and accurate The Wilmington Monthly Meeting Min

attentton. ute" Book, (Womens Branch), commencing 1827, and ending Sixth month, 1846, having

Address orders to Department “ C.''

Our home treatment, which contains been lost, anyone having said Book in their

two months' supply of Compound possession or any knowledge of the same, would confer a favor to the meeting by communicating

Oxygen, inhaling apparatus ; full di- Strawbridge & Clothier, with William P. Bancroft, Clerk thereof, Wil.

rections sent to any part of the coun

PHILADELPHIA. mington, Delaware.

try.

This includes medical advice First-day evening meetings (Philadel

during treatment. Pamphlet with ad. phia!, this month are held at Race above 15th

vice to the sick, home treatment, and street, at 7.30 o'clock. It will be a great satis

testimonials free.

The Right Shoe for faction to have general attendance of our

You is the members.

DRS. STARKEY & PALEN,

YOU CAN GET. 1529 Arch Street, * The Visiting Committee of Baltimore

Philadelphia, Pa.

We have the Best $3, $4, and $5 Yearly Meeting have arranged for the following

oc Meetings in Fourth month.

Spring and Summer Shoes. 17. Pipe Creek and Drumore.

Samuel Dutcher, 45 N. 13th St. 24. Washington and Huntington.

GEORGE B. COCK,
JOHN J. CORNELL, Chairman.

Stenographer,

Please inention FRIENDS' INTEL*** First-day School Unions in Fourth month

DISTANCE 14 S. Broad St., Philadelphia. LIGENCER, when answering Advertiseoccur as follows:

TELEFHONE

ments in it. This is of value to us 23. Bucks.

Residence, 216 W. Coulter Street and to the advertisers.
Wester,

1-4!-25-D.

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THE GUARDIAN SECURITY, TRUST AND DEPOSIT CO.,

No. 7 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md.
This Company does a General Trust and Banking Business. Interest allowed on Deposits. Acts
as Executor, Administrator, Trustee,-executing Trusts of every kind, -Receiver, Guardian, etc.
Interests or Dividends Collected, Real Estate managed for residents or non-residents, etc. etc.
President,

Vice-Presidents,

Secretary and Treasurer,
Edward Stabler, Jr. Daniel Miller and Jonathan K. Taylor. William M. Byrn.
Executive Committee :

Wm. H Bosley, Chairman, Henry C. Matthews, Daniel Miller, John L.
Blake, Francis A. White, Matt C. Fenton, Lewis A. Gusdorff.

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The Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia
409 Chestnut St.

Capital, $1,000,000, Fully Paid.
INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMIN-

ISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.
All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the assets of the Company.
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY; Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN; Vice-President and Actuary,
ASA S. WING; Manager of Insurance Department, JOSEPH ASHBROOKE; Trust Officer,
J. ROBERTS FOULKE: Assistant Trust Officer, J. BARTON TOWNSEND;

Assistant Actuary, DAVID G. ALSOP.

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PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OF PHILADELPHIA.
This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS OF LIFE AND ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at
actual NET Cost. It is PURELY MUTUAL; has ASSETS OF THIRTY MILLIONS, and a SUR-
PLUS of over 342 MILLIONS. ITS POLICIES ARE NON-FORFEITABLE AND INCONTESTABLE.
President,

Vice-President,

Secretary and Treasurer, HARRY F. WEST, GEORGE K. JOHNSON. HENRY C. BROWN.

J. T. JACKSON & CO., Real Estate Brokers,

No. 711 WALNUT ST., PHILA.

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Rents, Sales, Mortgages, etc., etc.

LIFE INSURANCE,

ANNUITY, AND

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PETER WRIGHT & SONS

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305-307 WALNUT ST., PHILAD'A. LETTERS OF CREDIT for Travelers.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE bought and sold. The purchase and sale of Prime Investment Securities a Specialty.

Loans negotiated on Real Estate. Interest allowed on deposits.

Eastern Nebraska Investments.

OFFICERS:
EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS, President.

HENRY TATNALL, Vice-President.
WM. NEWBOLD ELY, Treas, and Sec’y.

N. B. CRENSHAW, Real Estate Officer.
EDW. SYDENHAM PAGE, Ass't Sec’y.

A. A. JACKSON, Ass't to Pres. and Vice-Pres. CHARLES JAMES RHOADS, Ass’t Treas.

WM. E. AUMONT, Manager Trust Dept.
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM, Solicitor.

MANAGERS:
EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS,
WILLIAM H. JENKS,

GEO. H. MCFADDEN,
John A. Brown, Jr.,
George TUCKER BISPHAM,

HENRY TATNALL,
BENJAMIN W. RICHARDS,
WILLIAM H. Gaw,

ISAAC H. CLOTHIER,
John B. GARRETT,
FRANCIS I. Gowen,

JOHN C. SIMS,
PEMBERTON S. HUTCHINSON,

JOSIAH M. BACON.
BROAD AND CHESTNUT STREETS

Long or Short Time.

Netting 6 per cent. to 8 per cent.,

With perfect security.
Collection of interest and principal attended to without
cost to investor. Correspondence invited.
BANK OF MONROE, Monroe, Platte Co., Neb.
JOSEPH WEBSTER,

WM. WEBSTER,
President.

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Cashier

. Carpetings, Linoleum, PHILADELPHIA & READING RAILWAY. Window Shades, etc.

Benjamin Green,

ANTHRACITE COAL.

NO SMOKE.

NO CINDERS. DOUBLE TRACKED.

33 N. Second St., Philad'a.

H.C.BODEN & CO.

WALNUT & 13"STS. MANUFACTURING OPTICIANS

PHILADELPHIA

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WALL PAPER of

Attractive Styles
Popular Prices
Samples Free to any Address

A. L. Diament & Co.,
1624 Chestnut St.

Philadelphia, Pa.

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John C. Hancock & Co.,

N. W. Cor. 9th and Master Sts.

(P. & R. R. R.)

KIN, WILLIAMSPORT, AND POINTS

IN INTERIOR PENNSYLVANIA.

DEALERS IN BEST GRADES OF

LEHIGH AND COAL FREE BURNING

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J. LINVILL, uwoice Lehigh Coal, Removed to 1827 N. 10th St., Philad'a.

SPEED.

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