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Royal Reading Route to

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W.M. NEWBOLD ELY. Treas. and Sec'y.
EDW. SYDENHAM PAGE. Ass’t Sec'y. - A. A. JACKSON, Ass’t to Pres, and Vice-Pres,
CHARLES JAMES RHOADS, Ass’t Treas. WM. E. AUMONT, Manager Trust Dept.
GEORGE TUCKER BISPHAM, Solicitor. -
MANAGERS:

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Royal Blue Line to New York.
SWIFTEST AND SAFEST TRAINS
IN THE WORLD.

M. W. Gor, 9th and Master Sts.
(P. & R. R. R.)

DEALERS IN Best GRADES OF

Scenic Reading Route to Telephone Connection.
READING, HARRISBURG, GETTYS-
BURG, CHAMBERSBURG, SHAMO-
KIN, WILLIAMSPORT, AND POINTS

IN INTERIOR PENNSYLVANIA.

#TheConard&Jones Co.

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& We ask special attention to our splendid stock
8 of Roses on their own roots, new and
3. rare house plants, New Pedigree Cannas, :

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DIRECTORS.

Charles S. Hinchman,
Edward S. Sayres, -
J. Bolton Winpenny

Nicholas Brice,
Spencer M. Janney,
§ Lucas,

. Davis Page, Elwood Becker, Joseph R. Rhoads, Edwin S. Dixon, ohn F. Lewis, Hood Gilpin,

homas R. Gill, Warren G. Griffith,

Howard L. Haines.

the most gorgeous and handsome flowers for

CLEANLINESS bedding now known, and hundreds of other choice flowers, bulbs and seeds for home plantSAFETY AND ing. Best quality, lowest prices. C. & J.

Floral Guide, 84 pp. 2 col. plates, Free.

Surpassing Flower Seeds a specialty. ...; £2&@@989&Qooooooooooooooooo.

John C. Hancock & Co.,

LEHIGH AND C O A L FREE BURNING

oceseoeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees

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- ILADELPHIA, 921 ARCH STREET, FOURTH MONTH 9, 1898.

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g PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY Friends’ Intelligencer Association, (LIMITED.)

SINGLE SUBSCRIPTION, $2.oo PER ANNUM.

. . To subscribers residing west of the Mississippi River

a discòunt of one-fourth from this rate, making the price
$1.5opær annum.
To those who get up and forward “Clubs’ we will
give one extra copy, free, for each ten subscribers.
Single copies, 5 cents.

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Subscriptions MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIME.

WHEN IT. Is DesireD To Discontinue, NoTICE MUST BE Given. We Do Not “stop” PAPERs ExcEPT Upon order of subscriber.

OFFICES: 92; ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHEcks, DRAFTs, or Post-office Money ORDERs; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of the person so sending. Co-Draw checks and money orders to the order of FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER AssoCIATION, LIMITED.

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.
A Good WoRD EACH WEEK.—XV., . . 253
PoETRY : BE PATIENT, e . . . . 253
FRIENDs’ VIEws STATED BY MAURICE, . . 253
A FRIENDS' Journ EY IN WAR.TIME . . . 255

THE AMERICAN REVISION OF THE BIBLE, 257

FRIENDS' NEW TESTAMENT LESSONS.–
No. 16, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Scripture Study at Race Street, . . 259

Temperance Lessons (for Adult Classes), 259

A DEAF PERSON IN CHURCH, . . . . . . 260
WoRLDLINESS AND UNworldLIN ESs, . . 260
AN APRIL DAY, . . . . . . . . 26.I
EDITORIAL :
The Children's “Hour, ' . . . . . . . 262
DEATHS, . . . . . . . . . 262

NEWS OF FRIENDS :

A Visit to Jericho, L. I., . . . . . . . 263

Notes, te & ge e & e so o e e © e 263 A REMINDER, . . . . . . . . . . 263 FRIENDS AND SLAVES IN BARBADOES, . 263

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD REMINISCENCEs, 264

FRIENDS (O.) at CHICAGo, . . . . 265
CoNFERENCEs, Assogations, ETC., . . . 266
EDUCATIONAL jo * - - - - - . 267
LiterARY Notes, . . . . . . . . . . 267
COMMUNICATIONS:
Emerson, Not Tennyson, . . . . . 268
PERSONAL NoTES, . . . . . . . . 268

PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED . . . . . . . . 268
METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR THIRD

MONTH, 1898, . . . . . . . . . . 268 PoETRY : Truth; The Poet Laureate's Latest; Life's Stages; . . . . . . . 268

YELLOWSTONE PARK, . . . . . . . . . 268
“SNUBBING,” . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
AN INCIDENT IN FRANCES WILLARD's LIFE, 269
A GREAT MonoLITH IN WISCONSIN, . . . 269
. 270
CURRENT EVENTS, . . . . . . . . . . 27o
NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGs, . . . . . 271
Notices, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

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With this week the Spring Clothing Season can be said to be fully opened. Now are at their best all the goods and styles the plans and work of the past months. We ask your consideration of our merchandise and our methods. All these goods are made by us or for us and are especially adapted to the people for whom we cater, the best people in Philadelphia and New York. They are goods that will give satisfaction to the wearer in quality, style, and durability. We avoid selling any goods that will not give such satisfaction. Do not be astonished at the low prices. They are produced simply by our large operations months ago before the rise in woolens and by our reduced profits. We expect in two years by these methods to double our business. Profits shall come from the business increase. Suits, such as sell for $1o to $25–$7.50 to $20. Overcoats, such as sell for $10 to $30–$7.50 to $25.

Some last fall’s overcoats from our New York house, at $5 to $12.50; were $10 to $25.

E. O. Thompson’s Sons, 1338 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA.

Josiah G. WILLIAMS,
No. 13 N. Eleventh Street, near Market,

PHILADELPHIA. (Formerly of ro27 Market Street.)

IN the spring the housewife's thoughts turn to the renovating of things. This is where my long experience and training enable me to be of help. I will re-upholster your furniture, and can make it look as well, sometimes better, than when it was new. I make and hang curtains and draperies of all kinds, and awnings. And I charge only moderate prices. Brass and enameled bedsteads are coming to be greater favorites every year. They are very handsome and convenient—but that's only part of the reason. They’re clean—they’re safe : there’s no room for doubts and suspicions. It’s a wise housekeeper who knows what is in her own mattresses. I know, because it is all put in here in the building, under my own eye; I don’t sell factory-made mattresses. To make sure, rip open an unexpected corner, if you like, and peep in. Come and see the new styles, and get prices.

YOUNG FRIENDS' ASSOCIATION.

The regular meeting of the Young Friends'
Association will be held on Second-day evening,
Fourth month II, 1898, at eight o'clock, in the
Lecture Room, I5th and Race streets.
PROGRAM.
I. Review of “Dolly Madison,” by Maude
Wilder Goodman.
ELEANOR FOULKE.
2. Do Not Friends need a Broader Idea of
Mission Work?
JoHN C. CRAIG.
3. A Quakers' Meeting, by Charles Lamb.

ISABEL CHAMBERS, Secretary.

Please mention FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER, when answering Advertisements in it. This is of value to us and to the advertisers.

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Established 1844. The Journal, 1873. s

A GOOD WORD EACH WEEK. XV.

OUR Father surely deals with us as intelligent

beings, upon whom he will not impose any belief which

is beyond our power of serviceable comprehension, or which is opposed to the best exercise of the reason and

moral sense with which he has endozwed us.

From the volume, “A Reasonable Faith,” (by William Pollard, Francis Frith, and Wm. Edw. Turner), the chapter on “The Atonement.”

BE PATIENT.

O HEART of mine, be patient
Some glad day,
With all life's puzzling problems
Solved for aye,
With all its storms and doubtings
Cleared away,
With all its little disappointments past,
It shall be thine to understand at last.

Be patient | Some sweet day
The anxious care,
The fears and trials, and the
Hidden snare,
The grief that comes upon thee
Unaware,
Shall with the fleeting years be laid aside,
And thou shalt then be fully satisfied.

Be patient keep thy life-work
to Well in hand.
Be trustful where thou canst not
Understand ;
Thy lot, whate'er it be, is
* Wisely planned ;
Whate'er its mysteries, God holds the key ;
Thou well canst trust him, and bide patiently.
—Presbyterian Messenger.

FRIENDS' VIEWS STATED BY MAURICE.

One of the best known of the English “Broad Church'' clergymen, in the present century, was Frederick Denison Maurice, (b. 1805, d. 1872). His book, “The Kingdom of Christ,” one of his most important works, was based upon a study of the system of the Friends, and was originally, when first published in 1838, in the form of “Letters to a Member of the Society of Friends.” (A third edition was issued, 1883, by Macmillan & Co.) We give below his review of the fundamental principles of Friends.

I. THIS principle, [of immediate divine guidance, and not the doctrine respecting perceptible influences, [as suggested by Joseph John Gurney,) must then, one would think, have been the central one of Primitive Quakerism. Nay, a really earnest Quaker would have been willing that the truth and value of his spiritual impressions should be tried by their conformity to it or disagreement with it. What then was this principle P William Penn, in his preface to Fox's Journal, expresses it in the following words: “They were directed to the light of Jesus Christ within them as the seed and

PHILADELPHIA, FOURTH MONTH 9, 1898.

Volume LV. Number 15.

| leaven of the kingdom of God; near all, because in all,

and God’s talent to all. A faithful and true witness and just monitor in every bosom, the gift and grace of God to life and salvation, that appears to all, though few regard it.” (Page 9.) This, he says (page 19) was “ their fundamental principle, the corner-stone of their fabric, and, to speak eminently and properly, their characteristic or main distinguishing point or principle ”; this principle of “the light of Christ within, as God's gift for man's salvation, is the root of the goodly trees of doctrines, that grew and branched out of it.” That this doctrine was the ground of Fox's teaching every page of his diary proves. It might be a conviction that he was sensibly led by the Spirit which induced him to break forth in this or that steeple-house, or to attack this or that Independent, Baptist, Presbyterian, or “Common-Prayer Man.” But, when he did speak, the words he uttered were : “Brother, there is light within thee: resist it and thou art miserable; follow it and thou art happy.” And he again and again expresses his assurance that these were the words which produced a real moral effect upon his hearers; that whatever else he said was valuable only as it arose out of them, or tended to illustrate and enforce them. He believes that he spoke to something which was in those to whom he spoke, and that, being there, it answered his appeal. It was not from the teachers or popular books of the day that Fox learnt this doctrine. The language in which he described his early life is remarkably unlike that which we meet with in Puritan biographies. “At eleven years of age,” he says, “I knew pureness

and righteousness”; while he was a child he was

taught how to walk to be kept pure; when he grew up and “was put to a man that was a shoemaker by trade, and that dealt in wool, and used grazing, and sold cattle, and a great deal passed through his hands, he never wronged man or woman, for the Lord's power was over him to preserve him . . . . people had generally to love him for his honesty and innocency.” The conflicts of mind, which he describes afterwards, had no relation to any of the controversies, religious or political, by which England was then torn asunder. Of Prelacy or Covenant, King or Parliament, he knew nothing. The awful question, What am I?—what have I to do in this strange, confused world? occupied his soul. It is one which must be new to each man, though thousands may have been vexed with it before him. Those whom Fox consulted about it afforded him little help ; he withdrew from the society of his fellow-creatures and studied his Bible. Even that seemed not to tell him the secret which he wanted to know: one thing, however, he learnt; there was in him that which shrank from this inquiry, and would fain forget it altogether, and there was that in him which would have no rest till he found the answer to it. Now, was not this in itself a great discovery P Did it not show him (in part at least), what kind of being he was P. He had desires which drew him down to things which he saw, and tasted, and handled ; he had desires which aspired after something with which his senses and appetites had nothing to do. And was there not another discovery contained in this 2 They were actual earthly objects which attracted him toward themselves; his nature inclined him to them, yet, when he obeyed that nature, he seemed to lose what was most real in him. Must there not be a counter-attraction, a power as real as any of those things which he beheld, raising him out of them, urging him to seek something above himself, a real, substantial good P Must not that power be in truth greater, though the contrary might seem to be the case, than all which were resisting it 2 Could he not obey that higher influence, and, by obeying it, obtain life and peace P He felt that he could; that he was meant to do so. The light was stronger than the darkness. He was privileged to dwell in it. But was this light then, afforded only to George Fox, the shoemaker P. How could this be P Did it not witness to him, that whenever he was setting up himself he was resisting it, not following it; when he was obeying his selfish inclinations, he knew that he was flying from this great teacher; when he desired to be led by it he knew that he was a man P Surely, then, this must be a light vouchsafed to him, because he was a man; it must be “a light which lighteneth every man who cometh into the world.” A terrible majority might be striving against it, but their very strivings against it proclaimed the truth; the kind of misery which men experienced showed the happiness which was intended for them. When he arrived at this conviction the Bible seemed to him a new book altogether. From first to last it witnessed to him of that invisible good which men are to seek after, and against the visible idolatries which are drawing them away from it. The lives of the patriarchs, of Moses, of the prophets, were the lives of men who were following the light, the teacher of their hearts, the Lords of righteousness, and were resisting the evil inclinations and appetites which would make them the slaves and worshipers of outward things. On the other hand all the records of the sins of the Jewish nation, or of heathen nations, were records of revolts from this mysterious guide and teacher, by men who chose darkness rather than light, the outward and apparent good rather than the real and inward. As might be expected the darkness became continually more gross in each individual who gave himself up to it, and the light brighter and clearer to each one who steadily pursued it. And so it had been in each new period—greater blindness and sensuality, greater and more immediate illumination. Jews and Gentiles becoming more estranged from Him who was yet revealing Himself to them both; holy prophets holding more

wonderful converse than their fathers had done with the Word of God—rising more above outward emblems and institutions, obeying more implicitly his inward suggestions. Such, or nearly such, was the form in which the Old Testament history seems to have presented itself to Fox; and therefore the words at the beginning of the Gospel of St. John appeared to him to stand in the most natural connection with all the records to which they refer. And St. Paul's declarations, in the first and second of Romans, that the Gentiles knew God, but glorified him not as God, and liked not to retain Him in their knowledge; and that the Gentiles, as well as the Jews, if they sought for glory and honor and immortality, would obtain eternal life; while the Jews as well as the Gentiles, if they were contentious and obeyed not the truth but obeyed unrighteousness, would have tribulation and wrath—far from containing a puzzle, which it required critical ingenuity to surmount, appeared to him the simple announcement of a truth with which all the rest of the Scripture was in agreement. II. But how was the condition of men affected by the appearance of our Lord in human flesh P This was a question which probably did not at first present itself to Fox; but by degrees he and the other Quakers found an answer to it. Men having foregone their spiritual privileges and given themselves up to the flesh, were not indeed forsaken by their heavenly Teacher, but they could not be treated as spiritual. By outward emblems and images, the elements of the world, they were trained: to the Jews was given a direct intimation of the nature and purpose of their discipline; the Gentiles, through a thicker film of sense, and with fewer helps to penetrate it, might yet, if they would, discover their invisible guide. But these were preparations for a clearer day. Christ, the Living Word, the Universal Light, appeared to men, and showed in his own person what processes he was carrying on in the hearts of all; subduing the flesh, keeping Himself separate from the world, submitting to death. This manifestation was the signal for the commencement of a new dispensation; sensible emblems were no longer to intercept man's view of the Lord; national distinctions were to be abolished ; men might be treated as belonging to a higher state than that which they lost in Adam; they might attain a perfection which did not exist in Adam. The Scriptural testimonies to this doctrine seemed to them most numerous. Stripped of the fantastical covering in which they were sometimes enveloped, few readers will think that they received a forced or unnatural construction. The announcement by the Prophets of a dispensation which should have these two characteristics above all others—spirituality and universality; the evident annulling, in the Sermon on the Mount, of rules and maxims which had been previously current, and the substitution of a spiritual principle for them ; our Lord’s constant declaration that he came to establish a kingdom, and that that kingdom was to be within us; the announcement of the Evangelists that his parables were the discovery of mys

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