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mortgage of the United States on the Kansas Pacific Railroad was released for payment of the principal, $6,603, ooo, the interest, about $6,600, Ooo, being given up. This is a loss to the public treasury of the latter sum, as the interest has been advanced by the United States treasury, and now is not recovered. The United States Senate, by a vote of 34 to 29, passed a resolution disapproving the compromise. It appears that the “Government ownership of railroads” had its influence on the transaction, and Harper's Weekly says: “Only a few weeks ago there was some reason to fear the Government might bid in the property the country ought to congratulate itself on the important ‘step that has been taken towards freeing it from the imminent danger of further communism.” HIGHLAND PARK HOTEL, at Aiken, S. C., the chief hotel of the place, largely patronized by Northern people, was destroyed by fire on the 6th ult., in the morning. The Schofield School Bulletin says word was sent for help. “We telephoned to the Farm for wagons, and twenty young men were soon on the grounds, where our boys, under the direction of our Business Manager, (Robert Benson), worked well in removing furniture and loading our wagons which had come in hastily from the Farm under control of our Farm Manager, Philip Richardson.” There were one hundred and fifty guests in the house, most of whom “remained in Aiken, engaging all the unrented cottages, and filling up the private houses.” WE do not, as our readers are aware, usually report crimes. But one or two of recent occurrence seem to demand notice. On the 22d ult., at Lake City, South Carolina, a mob surrounded the house of the Postmaster, Fraser Baker, a negro, set fire to the building and riddled it with bullets. Baker and an infant child were killed, and his wife and two daughters were badly injured. The bodies of the man and child were burned with the building. The act of the mob was without motive except resentment at a colorcd man holding the place of postmaster. In the Indian Territory, a few weeks ago, two Indians were set upon by a mob, at a place called Mound, and were burned to death, upon accusation of some crime. A dispatch now received (confirmatory of others), from Guthrie, Oklahoma, says evidence has been found that both the Indians were innocent. THE steamship La Champagne of the French line, New York and Havre, was towed into Halifax, N. S., on the 27th ult., by another steamer, the Roman. She was due at New York on the 20th, and her non-arrival caused great anxiety. On the 17th, while near the Banks of Newfoundland, she broke her shaft, and was completely disabled. A boat with thirteen men, was sent out to seek help, and this, after six days exposure, was picked up on the 24th by a steamer from Holland, the Rotterdam, and brought to New York, the men being badly frost-bitten and at the point of perishing. La Champagne had on board 497 persons. Her safety caused general rejoicing. WILLIAM M. SINGERLY, president of the Philadelphia Record newspaper company, and chief owner of that journal, died suddenly on the 27th ult., at his home of heart disease,_ an aneurism of the aorta. He was president of the Chestnut Street National Bank, and Chestnut Street Trust Company, whose recent failure was noted in this column. A post-mortem examination disclosed the cause of his death, as here stated. His physician, Dr. E. P. Bernardy, said : “Mr. Singerly was an inveterate smoker, and for years had suffered from what is called a ‘tobacco heart.' I forewarned his family that some day he would die suddenly in just the way he has. He knew that his heart was weak, but always laughed at the thought of danger.” He was in his 66th year. PROCEEDINGS in Congress have been comparatively unimpressive. The Hawaiian Treaty is still not disposed of, in the Senate, and is likely to be again taken up, soon, in executive session. A very vigorous speech was made in the House against the policy represented by it, (the Treaty being itself

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only the Senate's business), by Representative Johnson, of the Richmond district of Indiana. Several measures to increase the army and navy efficiency have been introduced, both in the Senate and House. The routine business, including the appropriation bills, is well advanced in the House, and it is said to be the policy of Speaker Reed, who is in practical control of that body, 'to hasten the business, and bring about an early adjournment.

THE United States War Department announced on the 1st inst. that the relief expedition to the Klondike region had been abandoned, it being considered unnecessary. The reindeer bought in Norway by agents of the Government, for the expedition, left New York, by the Pennsylvania Railroad, on the 1st instant. They are 529 in number, and were said to be in good condition. They would go over the Great Northern road to Seattle. The Government will sell them, or add them to the reindeer herds which it already owns in Alaska.

JOSEPH LEITER, the Chicago grain speculator, who became the owner of so great a quantity of wheat about three months ago, represents himself as sure the price for “May delivery,” —i.e., the latest month before wheat of this year's harvest will begin to appear, will reach $1.25, or even $1.5o a bushel. He is holding on, he says, to his purchases. The price of May wheat, in Chicago, on the Ist inst., ranged from $1.04% to $1.05%, and was firm. In New York, the same day, May wheat was a fraction above $1. The exports continue large, and supplies abroad tend to diminish. Very large exports of corn have been made, and the price has been stiffened. The price in Philadelphia, on the 1st, for yellow, was 35% cents. Food has seriously risen in price abroad, and “bread riots '' are reported continually in different countries, especially Spain and Italy.

NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.

THE movement to have a Reunion of the Foulke Family, descendants of Edward and Eleanor, who came from Wales to

Pennsylvania in 1698, has made some progress. An Executive Committee, to have charge of the affair, has been ap+ pointed. The time has been fixed for Fifth month 30, next,

the place, Gwynedd. Frank Foulke (present address, The Gladstone, I Ith and Pine streets, Philadelphia), has been ap

pointed Secretary of the Association, and Joseph T. Foulke,

Ambler, Pa., assistant secretary. Correspondence on the sub.

ject should be addressed to either of them.

—A plan is afoot in New York to build one or more hotels for the exclusive use of self-supporting women. The proposition is to organize a corporation to be known as the Woman's Hotel Company, with a capital of one million dollars, the corporation to be formed when $500, Ooo is subscribed. Then land is to be bought, and a hotel built to hold about a thousand boarders. Plans for such a hotel have been drawn, subject to change, and subscription papers circulated. The minimum cost for board and lodging would be six dollars per week.

—A dispatch from Pittsburg, 28th ult., says: The remains of George W. G. Ferris, known throughout the world for his daring invention and construction of the great “Ferris Wheel,” at the Chicago World's Fair, are still held at the crematory of Undertaker Samson, in this city, for the unpaid funeral expenses, contracted over a year ago. Mr. Ferris was practically penniless at his death, but carried insurance to the amount of $25, ooo. This, it is said, was eaten up by the numerous claims left.

—The Fire-warden of Minnesota reports, that in 21 counties, last year, forest fires swept over 14,912 acres of light forest and meadow. He hints that settlers, burning of timber and prairie, are responsible for most of these fires. He thinks that people in America have little idea of what they mean Only those who have seen the forests of Europe under forestry administration, he says, can have a true idea of what forestry means.

—“Personally,” says the Outlook, “Miss Willard was absolutely free from any asperity, intolerance, or phariseeism. Her manner was cordial and winning, her sense of humor considerable, and her temper sweet and womanly.”

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—Spain appears to be suffering internally very acutely. The Madrid correspondent of the London Times telegraphs that “there is an appalling scarcity of food in many provinces of Spain. The price of wheat is unprecedentedly high. Bread riots are of daily occurrence at Salamanca, and it is feared that martial law will be proclaimed.”

THE London Daily News has been circulating, among persons over eighty years of age, a printed circular of questions as to the habits of life by which they have secured their longevity. A good many persons have responded. It is curious how wide a divergency of habits is disclosed, even in such important matters as diet and bathing. But there is one significant resemblance among the replies. Out of all the many answerers there are only three who have been smokers; and, of these three, one was “very moderate ’’ and the other ‘‘ only occasional.”

RELATIONSHIP with nature is a resource of inexhaustible delight and enrichment; to establish it ought to be as much a part of every education as the teaching of the rudiments of formal knowledge; and it ought to be as great a reproach to a man not to be able to read the open pages of the world about him as not to be able to read the open page of the book before him.—Asamilton W. Mabze. .

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NOTICES.

*** A Philanthropic Conference will be held in the Friends' meeting-house, Woodstown, N. J., Fourth-day evening, Third month 9, (the evening before Quarterly Meeting). Two papers will be prepared and read, one on “The Economic Phase of the Temperance Question,” and the other on “Our County Jails.” Also recita. tations and a quiz on the above papers prepared by Jessie L. Colson.

*** Salem Quarterly Meeting at Woodstown, N. J., will be held First month Io. Train leaving Philadelphia, (Market Street ferry), at 8.20 a. m., reaching Woodstown in time for meeting.

*** A religious meeting will be held at Friends' Home for Children, 4011 Aspen street, West Philadelphia, First day, Third month 6, at 3 p. m.

Ministering Friends and all persons interested in the welfare of destitute children are cordially invited to attend.

S. T. R. EAVENSON, M. D.

*...* Friends' Charity Fuel Association will meet this (Seventh-day evening, Third month 5, at 8 o’clock, in Friends' Parlor, Race above 15th street, Philadelphia. BENJAMIN WAlton, Clerk.

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*** First-day evening meetings, Philadelphia, this month, at N. W. corner 17th St. and Girard Ave., 7.30 o'clock, commencing to-morrow, Third month 6. It is very desirable Friends should show an interest by attending.

*** The Visiting Committee of Baltimore

| Yearly Meeting has arranged for the following

meetings for Third month, viz:
6. Little Falls.
13. Park Avenue, Baltimore.
20. Hopewell, Va.
27. Washington, and Aisquith St., Balt.
John J. CORNELL, Chairman.

*** A regular meeting of Young Temperance Workers will be held in the meeting-house, at Girard avenue and 17th street, t Philadelphia), on Seventh-day evening, Third month 5, at 8 . Isl. p The evening will be devoted to Hawthorne. Jos. C. EMLEY, President.

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Edward H. MAGILL, (Conclusion), . 180 MEMORIES OF OLD FRIENDS : ANNA MARIA Fox. BY THoMAS Hodgkin, I82 FRIENDS'' NEW TESTAMENT LESSONS.– No. 12, . . . . . . . . . . . . . I84 Scripture Study at Race Street, . . . . 185 Temperance Lessons (for Children), . I85 |EDITORIAL : Practical Activity, . . . . . . . . . . . I86 BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, . 186, 187 THE RELIGIOUS CoNGRESS PROGRAM, . . I87 MILITARISM Discussed, . . . . . . . . 187 Notes FROM ISAAC WILson.—V., . . . . 188 WoRK of the Schofield ScHool, . . . 188 WHITEwATER QUARTERLY MEETING, . . 189 CONFERENCEs, ASSOCIATIONS, Etc., . . I90 EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, . . . . . . 191 LITERARY NOTES, . . . I92 PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED, . I 92 QRTHODox FRIENDS, . . . . . . I92 PERSONAL NoTEs, . . . . . . . . . . 19° CoMMUNICATIONS : S An Armenian, . . . . . . . . . . . 493 Addresses Wanted, . . . . . . . . . 193 An Old Marriage Certificate, . . . . . 193

NotES FROM MT. PLEASANT School, S.C., 193

METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR SECOND

Month, 1898, . . . . . . . . . . 193 PoETRY: Courage; Having Company, . . 194 THE ARMENIAN SUFFERERs, . . . . . . I94 CURRENT Events, * & s . 195 NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS, 196 NOTICES, . 196, iii

MONEY - SAVING methods of advertising. Booklets written. S. Edward Pasch ALL,

West Chester, Pa. In Philadelphia daily.

WASHINGTON AND MT. VER6.75 NON.—FOUR DAYS. Will leave 24th and Chestnut Sts., Fourth-day, March 30, at Io.26 a.m. Pullman service. Headquarters, Ebbitt House. For further information, address REBECCA B. NICHOLSON, Camden, N. J.

Young Friends' Association.

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M. L. PHILIBERT, FRENCH

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MCCLEES GALLERIES J. E. McCLEEs & Co., Ltd.

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OLD ".” PRINTS STUDENTs of art, literature, or history find an inexhaustible store of illustrations in the great collection of the SouLE PHotoGRAPH Co., of Boston, for which we are agents. Scenes of travel in all countries; castles, cathedrals, and cities of Europe; portraits of royalty and celebrities of all times, past and present; reproductions of famous art works, old and new ; these are a part only. With such a collection to draw upon, illustrating becomes an absorbing pleasure.

SOME RECENT PICTURES.

“London to York,” a scene in the old coaching days, by W. Dendy Sadler. The parlor of the inn; “Time's up !” calls the guard.

“The Offer of Marriage,” an etching from the painting by W. Dendy Sadler.

“Vespertina Quies,” a fine engraving from the painting by Burne-Jones.

A COLLECTION of paintings in oil and watercolors by W. Livingston HENDERSoN, mainly historical landscapes of England, Scotland, and Germany, is now on exhibition in our galleries No charge for admission.

The Aquarille

OCEAN END OF TENNESSEE Ave., ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.

The house has been thoroughly renovated. It is well heated and home-like. OPEN ALL THE YEAR.

M. E. & M. H. Humpton. The Pennhurst,

Michigan Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J.

The house has every convenience, including steam heat and an electric elevator running to level of pavement. Open all the year. Send for illustrated booklet.

JAMES HOOD.

SWARTH MORE.

For rent or sale, Queen Anne Cottage, 12 rooms, steam heat, and open fire grates. The location is very delightful, directly overlooking the athletic grounds of the College, and very close to the meeting-house; one acre of ground, and plenty of fruit. Apply to . DAVID SCANNELL, 814 Arch Street.

You send Two Dollars—We do the rest.

1O POUNDS OF INGRAM'S BLENDED COFFEE

210 S. Eighth St., Philadelphia. Branch Office, 727 S. Second Street.

Cleaning of Blankets and Lace Curtains a specialty

(Whole or Ground)

will be sent free within fifty miles of Philadelphia to railroad station where package stamp can be used.

William S. Ingram,
31 North Second Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY MILK.
CONSHOHOCKEN Special attention given to serv-
DAIRIES. ing families. Office 603 North
Eighth Street, Philadelphia, Penna.
JOSEPH L. JONES.

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