Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors]

JAMES VICKS SONS, Rochester, N. Y. -
-- - - - Just Received from England

1 -
to:o Wick's so MăgăZillo, A fine lot of handsomely decorated Tea Can-
- - nisters in commemoration of the Queen's
The Famous Gardening Authority, Jubilee, which are filled with

Is a veritable mine of information about Flowers, Veg- INGRAM'S FINE BLENDED TEA
etables and Fruits, and how to grow and care for them - -
successfully. The price of Woo. Illustrated o, PRICE, SEVENTY-FIVE CENTS EACH.
Magazine is Fifty Cents per year, but if you will re. If four of them are ordered to the same address
too.o.o. oo: we will pay the expressage.

gaZ 1 1 O you regularly for gix ot
months for trial. Write at §§§ g y ||||||| § |N|| 31 Soro,

VICK PUB. CO., ROCHESTER, N. Y. - y -
BARLOW'S INDIGO BLUE. Hanscom Bros., 1311 Market St.,
Its merits as a WASH BLUE have been fully tested n

and indorsed by thousands of housekeepers. Your Sell a Mocha and Java at 36 cts. that

grocer ought to have it on sale. Ask him for it.
D. S. Wiltberger, Prop. 233 N. 2d St., Phila., Pa.

is superior to any coffee obtainable.

[ocr errors]

-

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

AND JOURNAL.

PHILADELPHIA, 921 Arch STREET, SECOND MONTH 19, 1898.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The house has every convenience, including steam heat and an electric elevator running to level of pavement. Open all the year. for illustrated booklet. - * . e. - JAMES HOOD.

member of

Salary and commission.

rooms, steam heat, and open fire grates.

Send r

Advertisements of “Wanted,” “For Rent,” “For Sale,” etc., 5 cents a line, each insertion. Seven average words make a line. No advertisement inserted for less than 20 cents.

A YOUNG WOMAN, FRIEND, WISHES POSItion as companion. Willing to travel. Address No. 18, this Office. .

OARDING. — A WIDOW WITH ONE CHILD can board a married couple, or two gentlemen. 2240 Camac Street, Philadelphia.

R RENT.-CHOICE OF TWO FURNISHED cottages, in the heart of the Appalachians, thirty miles west of Asheville, N. C. A delightful all the year round climate, especially helpful in pulmonary and nervous disorders. J. REECE §Włs. Waynesville, N.C.

ANTED.—A MATRON FOR THE PENINGton (a Friends’ Home in New York o: A. ew York Yearly Meeting desired. Apply THE PENINGTON, 215 East

by note immediately. 15th Street.

ANTED.—A YOUNG WOMAN TO SOLICIT custom for a pure home-made article of food. Address No. 17, this Office.

[blocks in formation]

For rent or sale, Queen Anne Cottage, 12 The location is very delightful, directly overlooking the athletic grounds of the College, and very close to the meeting-house; one acre of ground, and plenty of fruit. Apply to DAVID SCANNELL, 814 Arch Street.

[blocks in formation]

#1thligher’g Bepartment.

*** The advertisements of the National Lead Company are again inserted in the INTELLIGENCER, this season. The agents in charge of the business, George Batten & Co., New York, write us that they have inserted these advertisements in a list of religious newspapers since 1892, making now seven years consecutively. That the result is satisfactory is evidenced by this continuation of the order.

*** Peter Henderson & Co., 35 and 37 Cortlandt St., New York city, send us their manual, “Everything for the Garden,” for 1898. They aim to supply all wants of the cultivator, both for the grèenhouse and garden, and in this catalogue will be found offered, not only “everything for the garden,” but things needful for the farm as well. The catalogue may be had, free, by addressing the firm as above, sending, however, ten cents (in stamps) to cover postage and mailing .This firm no longer sup

ply their seeds to local dealers, and to obtain them you

must order direct.

*** We will still supply the Combination Offer, of the INTelligencer, the Century Magazine, and the “Cemtury Gallery of One Hundred Portraits,” but it is proposed by the Century Company to close the arrangement with the coming month. We therefore give notice to that

effect—that we will not receive orders for the Combina

tion later than Third month 31. We think it worth while to suggest that any who have paid for the INTelligencer, and who now think they would like to have the Century, and the Portraits, can send us $5.5o, and receive the latter two, in addition to the paper which they are receiving. *** A friend who kindly gets up a club for the INT1:1.LIGENCER writes us, enclosing a subscription, and adds : “When I sent my club she asked to have her paper discontinued. Now she says she cannot do without it.”

One of Three Papers.

WASHINGTON GlaptoeN writes: “City and State is one of the three papers I read. . . . I never take it up without experiencing a vital thrill; and I never lay it down without feeling that some reinforcement has come to my courage and my moral en

thusiasm. You ought to have fifty thousand subscribers

in Philadelphia. And if you had, Philadelphia would be a different city very speedily.” City and State represents no party, faction, or clique, and is the organ of no society, league, or committee. It always endeavors, however, to keep itself in kindly touch and in the broadest sympathy with every project and movement of honest men and women looking to the well-being of society. It aims to give the exact truth on all matters relating to the welfare of the city and State, free from bias or improper influence of any kind. Its motto is “Commonwealth above Party.”

City and State is issued weekly. Herbert Welsh, Managing Editor. Publication Office, 1305 Arch St., Philad a

One Dollar a year. Five cents a copy.

write FOR SAMPLE copies.

• I)urable. Work HENRY.C. ELLIS, #. women

House and Sign Painting. ... Residence, 404 N. 32d St. 112 N. TENTH ST.

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic]

v

[graphic]

Established 1844. The Journal, 1873.

PHILADELPHIA, SECOND MONTH 19, 1898.

Volume LV. Number 8.

A GOOD WORD EACH WEEK. VIII. DocTRINE, at best, is an institution of man, and therefore limited in its application and tends to fetter the soul. Not so with righteousness; it is a divine revelation open to the inner life of the true Christian traveler. SUNDERLAND P. GARDNER.

From a sermon delivered at Yarmouth, Ontario, in 1887.

THE PRESENCE

THE mountain statelier lifts his blue-veiled head,
While, drawing near, we must meet him face to face,
Here, as on holy ground, we softly tread ;
Yet with a tender and paternal grace,
He gives the wild flowers in his lap a place :
They climb his sides, as fondled infants might,
And wind around him, in a light embrace,
Their summer drapery, pink and clinging white.

Great hearts have largest room to bless the small, Strong natures give the weaker, home and rest : So Christ took little children to his breast, And, with reverence more profound, we fall In the majestic presence that can give Truth's simplest message: “'Tis by love we live.” —Ltécy Larcom.

For Friends' Intelligencer.

JOHN RUSKIN.

BY JOHN WILLIAM GRAHAM. IV. —THE SOCIAL REFORMER.

OUR last article concluded with an extract on Religion

which closed by referring us to Lazarus on the doorstep, so that we are landed, before we know it, over the gulf between religious and social questions; if indeed it be more than the gulf between thought and act. Is there no justification for a prophetic attack on our life now in England and in America P I do not speak of the eddies in the great stream of our social life, for I believe there is nothing too ghastly in physical misery, nothing too degraded in desperate wickedness, for it to occur in our diseased places ; but let us consider society in its normal state, and, by way of concentration, let us fix our eyes on a single point, a phenomenon familiar to all of us, viz., the lives of our own sisters. the factory women of our manufacturing districts. “Our own sisters!” Yes, our sisters I mean in that human family which we are so fond of talking about. Well, now, these girls in our factories are not ill-paid, nor under-fed. But look at this our favorable specimen. She slips about in her bare feet

on the oily factory floor, in a temperature unhealthily

high lest the threads snap, in an atmosphere fluffy with

particles of cotton, with the sound of machinery

drowning any gracious tones and causing the loud, harsh voices we know so well. She is learning to piece threads, but nowise to become a household flower, not at all growing fit to become a man's helpmate, and the mother of children. After marriage the state of things is worse, and amounts to a truly portentous evil. The mother here in Lancashire leaves the child to be “minded '' with the other babies in the street for a penny a day by an old woman, who is past anything better; and goes off herself to, we presume more skilled, because better remunerated labor at her four looms. What a moral state that reveals l More reward, so it appears, is given for helping a machine to weave the calico girdle of a Hindoo ryot than to train the body and mind of an English child. Truly we must agree with Emerson : •

“This is the day of the chattel,
Web to weave and corn to grind,
Things are in the saddle,
And ride mankind.”

Now this factory girl is the child of machinery. But for machinery she would never have been born; her living is taken away if the machine becomes useless. Is she a product which it does one good to contemplate P Machinery has created millions of pounds worth of wealth; it has become as necessary to England as her atmosphere, or the remains of it. What has been its effect on human beings P For if it be true that the whole creation waiteth for the revealing of the sons of God; if, that is, the healthy and perfect development of human beings, ever more and more like unto sons of God, is the purpose of creation; we must ask of machinery whether its tendency is to produce better, healthier, and wiser people, or people with stunted faculties, pale faces, unkind hearts. I have never yet been able to answer this question to myself. The upper classes have probably been benefited. This is matter for long pondering. All I would now point

out is that it is because Ruskin has to himself answered

this question absolutely, that his verdict of “Guilty" has gone forth against machinery. We may not agree with the verdict, we may interpret the evidence differently, but with his testing principle we must agree. No more than he does, can we wish wealth to accumulate and men decay.

Ruskin's conviction of the wickedness of the economists’ theory of wisdom and duty was abundantly confirmed by the evil product of much that was done under Orthodox economic sanction. He fought against the extension of railways and against steam machinery. His attitude about railways may be gleaned from the following:

“You have despised Nature : that is to say, all the deep and sacred sensations of natural scenery. The French Revolutionists made stables of the Cathedrals of France, you have made racecourses of the cathedrals of the earth. Your one conception of pleasure is to drive in railroad carriages round their aisles and eat off their altars. You have put a railroad bridge over the Falls of Schaffhausen. You have tunnelled the cliffs of Lucerne by Tell's Chapel. You have destroyed • the Clarens shore of the Lake of Geneva ; there is not a quiet valley in England that you have not filled with bellowing fire ; there is no particle left of English land which you have not trampled coal ashes into, nor any foreign city in which the spread of your presence is not marked by a consuming white leprosy of new hotels and perfumers' shops, the Alps themselves, which your own poets used to love so reverently, you look upon as soaped poles in a bear garden, which you set yourselves to climb and slide down again with ‘shrieks of delight.' articulate voice to say you are glad with, you fill the quietude of their valleys with gunpowder blasts, and rush home, red with cutaneous eruption of conceit, and voluble with convulsive hiccough of self-satisfaction.’’

We may not take so strong a view as Ruskin about railways, but we over here may be glad that his school of thought exists, and that it has been strong enough so far to save our Lake district from further damage.

I will take one more passage on this subject, which also may stand as a type of the power of style. The thought in it is of the simplest, viz., that there must always be agricultural land; but hear this piece of glorious speech:

“All England may if it so chooses, become one manufacturing town ; and Englishmen, sacrificing themselves to the good of general humanity, may live diminished lives in the midst of noise, of darkness, and of deadly exhalation. But the world cannot become a factory, nor a mine. No amount of ingenuity will ever make iron digestible by the million, nor substitute hydrogen for wine. Neither the avarice nor the rage of men will ever feed them ; and however the apple of Sodom and the grape of Gomorrah may

spread their table for a time with dainties of ashes and nectar

of asps, so long as men live by bread, the far away valleys

must laugh as they are covered with the gold of God, and the

shouts of His happy multitudes ring round the winepress and ‘the well.''

Ruskin is often accused of being inconsistent with his own gospel of simplicity of life on account of the cost of his books, which is to those who cannot afford the expensive ones, undoubtedly regrettable. Ruskin has in the first place a rich man’s fastidiousness as to good paper, which is, after all, cheap enough, a wise man's fastidiousness as to large print, a literary man’s fastidiousness as to wide annotatable margins. And he allows all these tastes to have full play, because he puts a high value on a good book, and does not think that books are properly valued when they are so cheap. Herein he is no doubt right; perhaps, even in a city favored by great “ department stores,” a good book is the cheapest commodity extant. Compare the benefit for life you may obtain from the sum of two dollars and fifty cents invested in “In Memoriam,” “Sartor Resartus,” “Paradise Lost,” and the “Origin of Species,” all good editions, with the same sum in a silk hat (not a very good edition), or two picnics, or “Tid Bits '' for three years, or a joint of beef, or two pounds of tobacco, or half a pair of trousers, or one boot, or being shaved for six months, or a certain quantity (I had better not try to be precise) of really good lace trimming. Ruskin wants to know how much the contents of the bookshelves of the United Kingdom, public and private, would fetch, as compared with the con

price of a large turbot for it !

When you are past shrieking, with no human

of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life.

| tents of its wine cellars. “What position would the

expediture on literature take, as compared with the expenditure on luxurious eating P. We talk of food for the mind, as of food for the body; now a good book contains food inexhaustibly; it is a provision for life and for the best part of us; yet how long most people would look at the best book before they would give the If public libraries were half as costly as public dinners, or books cost the tenth part of what bracelets do, foolish men and women might suspect there was good in reading, as well as in munching and sparkling.” g Much of this criticism is now out of date. of Ruskin's smaller works now only cost five shillings, and a few cost less. The “Seven Lamps,” for seven and sixpence, is one of the cheapest books I know of, by a living author. “Modern Painters ” costs £7, and the “Stones of Venice” four guineas, and neither of them is dear at the price. $ These are English prices for the English editions. I regret to say that between Ruskin and the American reading public there have arisen causes of misunderstanding. The absence of copyright caused cheap, pirated editions, poorly got up, to be brought out in America at the time when the daintiest of books were coming out under the author's sedulous care in England. The wrong did not stop at print and paper; it came to the more tender and delicate subject of plates. If your pirate a plate, your punishment is on your own head. I could not bear to look at the plates I saw in American editions of Ruskin, remembering the charming works they were supposed to be copies of. In reading American Ruskins (so far as I have seen any), turn over the page quickly and look the other way when you suspect a plate is there. Partly from soreness on this subject and partly from other reasons which my readers may hunt for in his books, Ruskin would not for a long time have any authorized edition

issued in America; but now that brought out by Prof.

Charles Eliot Norton is authorized, and I don’t know whether its plates are good or not. Perhaps some one who is up in American books can add an exact note as to present American editions which I cannot. I hardly feel that I have yet shown you how the main stream of the gospel according to Ruskin flows towards order, towards useful and appropriate beauty, and towards a natural and sweet purity of feeling on all things. I must, therefore, quote one more passage —central—from the author's heart:

“You will find that in all my late books I have summed the needful virtues of men under the terms of gentleness and justice : gentleness being the virtue which distinguishes gentlemen from churls, and justice that which distinguishes honest men from rogues. Now gentleness may be defined as the habit or state of love, and ungentleness or clownishness

the opposite habit or state of lust.

“Now there are three great loves that rule the souls of men ; the love of what is lovely in creatures, and of what is lovely in things, and of what is lovely in report. And these three loves have each their relative corruption, a lust—the lust And, as I have just said, a gentleman is distinguished from a churl by the purity of sentiment he can reach in all these three passions; by his imaginative love, as opposed to lust, his

Most

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »