Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]

AND JOURNAL.

- PHILADELPHIA, 921 ARCH STREET, SECOND MONTH 12, 1898.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY Friends’ Intelligencer Association, (LIMITED.)

SINGLE SUBSCRIPTION, $2.oo PER ANNUM.

To subscribers residing west of the Mississippi River a discount of one-fourth from this rate, making the price $1.5o per annum. To those who get up and forward “Clubs’’ we will give one extra copy, free, for each ten subscribers. Single copies, 5 cents.

SUBscriptions MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIME.

WHEN It is desire D To Discontinue, Notice MUST BE GIVEN. We Do NOT “Stop” PAPERs Except UPon order of SUBSCRIBER.

OFFICES: 921 ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Advertisements of “Wanted,” “For Rent,” “For Sale,” etc., 5 cents a line, each insertion. Seven average words make a line. No advertise. ment inserted for less than 20 cents.

OR RENT.-CHOICE OF TWO FURNISHED cottages, in the heart of the Appalachians, thirty miles west of Asheville, N. C. A delightful all the year round climate, especially helpful in pulmonary and nervous disorders. J. REECE LEWIS, Waynesville, N.C.

A R G E , CHEERFUL ROOM, WELL-FURnished, in private family, for rent. Address No. 16, This Office.

ANTED.—A YOUNG WOMAN TO SOLICIT custom for a pure home-made article of food. Salary and commission. Address No. 17, this Office.

ANTED.—INTELLIGENT COUPLE TO RUN small poultry farm on shares, near New York city. Address I. X. L., This Office.

ANTED.—MARCH TWENTIETH, A SUITE of three unfurnished rooms and private bath, in West Philadelphia. Board in house. Friends’ family preferred. References exchanged. Address, stating terms, H. L. KIRK, 517 Chestnut Street.

ANTED.—A WOMAN FRIEND, AS COM

panion and to assist in the care of two small

children. Apply to ANNA. T. HOOPES, 341 East Biddle Street, W.s. Chester, Pa.

ANTED.—A MAN (FRIEND) WISHES THE

care of an invalid gentleman. Experience in

mental derangement. First-rate city references. Address 12, this Office.

ARTIES DESIRING TO VISIT WASHINGTON can be accommodated with rooms and bo in a Friends’ family. One block from street cars passing railroad stations, Capitol, and public buildings. Terms, $1.5o a day. Address FRIEND, 1626 Nineteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D. C.

JOHN FABER MILLER, 325 Swede STREET, NorrisTown, PENNA. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW. Practicing in Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.

JOSEPH T. FOULKE,

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, ... s 623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. OFFICES': {...}}. Montgomery Co., Pa.

YOUNG FRIENDS' ASSOCIATION

The regular meeting of the Young Friends'

Association will be held in the Lecture Room,

15th and Race streets, on Second-day evening,
Second month 14, at 8 o'clock.
PROGRAM
TI. An illustration of the Work of The Litera-
ture Committee.
By ALMIRA. P. HARLAN.
II. Corrupt Business Practices and Individual
Responsibility Therefore.
By THOMAS H. SPEAKMAN.
III. Obedience and Liberty.
By ALICE HALL PAxson.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

All are invited. -
ISABEL CHAMBERS, Secretary.

SWARTHMORE.

For rent or sale, Queen Anne Cottage, I2 The location is very delightful, directly overlooking the athletic grounds of the College, and very close to the meeting-house; one acre of ground, and plenty of fruit. Apply to DAVID SCANNELL, 814 Arch Street."

łublisher's Bepartment.

*** “I embrace every opening,” says a valued friend and correspondent in Ohio, “to commend the INTELLIGENCER to our members, especially to such as are deprived of the opportunity to attend our meetings. Its reading would surely tend to keep alive their interest in the Society, and minister, besides, to their enjoyment.”

*** We have copies in stock of each issue since New Year, and can send to new subscribers the back numbers to that date.

*** “I think the INTELLIGENCER indispensable to every one imbued with Friends’ principles, which is only another name for Christian principles,”—says a friend writing from Indiana.

*** In reference to advertisements of “Wanted,” where persons replying are requested to address a Number, at this Office, we may state, as we have frequently done heretofore, that we undertake nothing more than (1) the insertion of the advertisement, and (2) the delivery of replies—written—to the advertiser. We cannot undertake to give information as to the details of the advertiser's wishes, or the qualifications, etc., of those replying; in fact, to do anything more than what has just been stated.

*** We have copies of the Review of “Hugh Wynne,” and will send, as before, to those desiring them. A stamp may be sent, when convenient. One cent will Carry three copies.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

A FARM containing 27 acres, more or less, bounded by lands of Joel Conard and others. A very, desirable and productive farm, all under cultivation. About one acre of asparagus, young peach orchard (trees, 1, 2, and 3 years planted), . trees and small fruit, large apple orchard of excellent fruit, The improvements consist of a large brick house, roofed with slate and tin, well built and in good repair, containing 13 rooms and excellent cellar with vault; bath-room with modern conveniences and hot and cold water; porches, large lawn, with fine shade trees. This house is very prettily situated, hnd should be seen to be appreciated. #. with ample shedding, 2-story hog-house, chicken, carriage, and tool house, and corn crib, all in good repair. Ice house and pond, constant flow of spring water at barn. Any one desiring a nice, cheery location for a home will do well to examine this property before purchasing elsewhere, and will be shown over the same by Mary E. Hopkins, residing thereon, or, T. C. Moore, West Grove, Pa.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

| "City and State represents, no

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

“City and State is one of the three papers I read.
. . . I never take it up without experiencing a vital
thrill; and I never lay it down without feeling that some
reinforcement has come to my courage and my moral en-
thusiasm. You ought to have fifty thousand subscribers
in Philadelphia. And if you had, Philadelphia would be
a different city very speedily.”
o—
arty, faction, or
clique, and is the organ of no society, league, or commit-
tee, it always endeavors, however, to keep itself in
kindly touch and in the broadest sympathy with every
project and movement of honest men and women looking
to the well-being of society. It aims to give the exact
truth on all matters relating to the welfare of the city and
State, free from bias or improper influence of any kind.
Its motto is “Commonwealth above Party.” . .

City and State is issued weekly.
Herbert Welsh, Managing Editor.
Publication]Office, 1305 Arch St., Philade
One Dollar a year.
Five cents a copy.

WRITE FOR SAMPLE COPIES.

GEORGE B. COCK,
Stenographer,
14 S. Broad St., Philadelphia.

[ocr errors]

23 North 13th St. -
316 Walnut St. STATIONERS.

Residence, 216 W. Coulter Street

1-42-25-D,

WILLIAM B. PAxson. MAHLon B. PAxson,
Members of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange.

FREDERICK PAXSON & CO.,

Stock and Bond Brokers,
112 Custom House Place, Philad 'a.

Orders and inquiries by mail or wire receive prompt ... attention.

WATCHES.

As one of the oldest houses in the watch trade – established three generations ago—and up to date in every feature of the business, we are able to offer the best and most serviceable watches for the least money. Give us a call.

GEO. C. CHILD,
1020 Chestnut St.—2d Floor."
Established 18ro at 824 North Second Street.

[subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

Established 1844.

The Journal, 1873. HILADELPHIA, SECOND MONTH 12, 1898. Number 7.

Volume LV.

[blocks in formation]

rents of thought about art ; the idea of the one described in the phrase, “Art for art's sake"—of the other in, “Art the expression of life.” To the young men of the former school, (and I instinctively call them young men, for that is what the present exponents of the school suffer from being), subject is nothing, spirit, aim and meaning are an intrusion, nothing matters but beauty, mere color and line beauty—a wilting cabbage may afford as good a subject as Elizabeth Fry—it all depends on tone, tint, composition, atmosphere, light, and so forth. Art therefore has no connection with character, either with that of the artist who paints or the nation who buys. This theory, the very opposite of the theory of the Greeks, is also the very opposite of Ruskin's. The great artist nation of history, like our teacher of today, valued art as the harmonious and beautiful expression of mind and feeling, and as a reliable index of national temper. This very matter is the central trunk of Mr. Ruskin's teaching, the truth from which his later work has branched out. In “Modern Painters,” and ever since he has told us how Art must be noble if it be good Art ; he has made peace (if you will indulge me in an irrepressible tendency to metaphor) by bidding fair Art to take strong Virtue to be her lord, receiving all her sustenance from, and showing to him only all her perfectness, or (to come down into the language of

prose and talk simply) the best men are needed to .

paint the best pictures, and a good man properly to appreciate one. John Milton has a parallel doctrine about his art. “He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem, that is, a composition of the best and laudablest things.” This statement about Ruskin's teaching will be evident if we examine his definition of greatness in art. It is in the forefront of his teaching, on pp. 7, 8, and 9 of the first volume of “Modern Painters,” and is well worth quotation for its own sake :

“Painting, or art generally, as such, with all its technicalities, difficulties, and particular ends is nothing but a noble and expressive language, invaluable as the vehicle of thought, but by itself, nothing. He who has learnt what is commonly considered the whole art of painting, that is the art of representing any natural object faithfully, has as yet only learned the language by which his thoughts are to be expressed. He was done just as much towards being that which we ought to respect as a great painter, as a man who has learnt how to express himself grammatically and melodiously has towards being a great poet. The language is indeed more difficult of acquirement in the one case than in the other, and possesses more power of delighting the sense, while it speaks to the intellect, but it is, nevertheless, nothing more than language, and ail those excellences which are peculiar to the painter as such, are merely what rhythm, melody, precision, and force are in the words of the orator and the poet—necessary to their greatness, but not the tests of their greatness. It is not by the mode of representing and saying, but by what is represented and said, that the respective greatness either of the painter or the writer is to be finally, determined.

“Speaking with strict propriety, therefore, we should call a man a great painter only as he excelled in precision and force in the language of lines, and a great versifier, as he excelled in precision or force in the language of words. A great poet would then be a term strictly and in precisely the same sense

applicable to both, if warranted by the character of the images so

or thoughts which each in their respective languages conveyed.

‘‘Take, for instance, one of the most perfect poems or pic tures (I use the words as synonymous) which modern times have seen : ‘The Old Shepherd's Chief Mourner.' Here the exquisite execution of the glossy and crisp hair of the dog, the bright sharp touching of the green bough beside it, the clear

painting of the wood of the coffin, and the folds of the blanket,

are language, language clear and expressive in the highest degree. But the close pressure of the dog's breast against the wood, the convulsive clinging of the paws, which have dragged the blanket off the trestle, the total powerlessness of the head, laid close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed and tearful fall of the eye in its utter hopelessness, the rigidity of repose which marks that there has been no motion nor change in the trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the coffin lid, the quietness and gloom of the chamber, the spectacles marking the place where the Bible was last closed, indicating how lonely has been the life, how unwatched has been the departure of him who is now laid solitary in his sleep—these are all thoughts—thoughts by which the picture is separated at once from hundreds of equal merit so far as mere painting goes, by which it ranks as a work of high art, and stamps its author, not as the neat imitator of the texture of a skin, or the fold of a drapery, but as the man of mind. Most pictures of the Dutch School, for instance, excepting always those of Rubens, Vandyke, and Rembrandt, are ostentatious exhibitions of the artist's power of speech, the clear and vigorous elocution of useless and senseless words, while the early efforts of Cinabue and Giotto are the burning messages of prophecy, delivered by the stammering lips of infants. The picture which has the nobler and more numerous ideas, however awkwardly expressed, is a greater and a better picture than that which has the less noble and less numerous ideas, however beautlfully expressed.” I need not say that this standard for art criticism is not the one in favor now, even when not expressed in the above absolute, uncompromising way. Mr. Whistler's young lions in the “Speaker” and in the “Spectator’’ would never be able to write another word from sheer gorge-filling contempt, were they present to hear the above extract. For a quiet humble citizen like myself, it is better to keep one's own counsel, and go on admiring the pictures one likes. Perhaps the habit of employing as art critics painters with time on their hands—“painters who have failed ” is the unkind way of putting it—may have caused the present fashion of glorifying exclusively the technical qualities of a canwas and despising “subject.” But it being now clear that I am an old fogey on art criticism, we will pass on to note the important connection between Mr. Ruskin's ideas about pictures and his later work in the region of economics and ethics and education. For his view of art, as being chiefly the expression of ideas, led him into dealing with those ideas, and so his subject expanded from art till it embraced the whole of the life, duty, and character of the man, and from theman concerned itself with the state which moulds him. (We say his theory led him on this path, but it is more likely that his genius produced this theory, and he followed both.) Ruskin has never swerved from the theory thus laid down. In the fifth volume of “Modern Painters,” he says, “In these books of mine, their distinctive character as essays on art, is their bringing everything to a root in human passion or in human hope.” And he repeats in the Epilogue to “Modern Painters ” written for the I888 edition, the dictum of his Oxford Lectures, that, “all great art is praise.”

[ocr errors]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »