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THE GUARDIAN SECURITY, TRUST AND DEPOSIT CO.,

No. 7 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Md.
This Company does a General Trust and Banking Business. Interest allowed on Deposits. Acts
as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, -executing Trusts of every kind,-Receiver, Guardian, etc.
Interests or Dividends Collected, Real Estate managed for residents or non-residents, etc. etc.
President,

Vice-Presidents,

Secretary and Treasurer,
Edward Stabler, Jr. Daniel Miller and Jonathan K. Taylor.

William M. Byrn.
Wm. H. Bosley, Chairman, Henry C. Matthews, Daniel Miller, John L.
Executive Committee :

Blake, Francis A. White, Matt C. Fenton, Lewis A. Gusdorff.

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The Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia
409 Chestnut St.

Capital, $1,000,000, Fully Paid.
INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMIN-

ISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.
All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the assets of the Company.
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY; Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN; Vice-President and Actuary,
ASA S. WING; Manager of Insurance Department, JOSEPH ASHBROOKE; Trust Officer,
J. ROBERTS FOULKE: Assistant Trust Officer, J. BARTON TOWNSEND;

Assistant Actuary, DAVID G. ALSOP.

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PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OF PHILADELPHIA.

This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS OF LIFE AND ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at ac-
tual Net Cost. It is PURELY MUTUAL; has ASSETS OF THIRTY MILLIONS and a SURPLUS of
over 372 MILLIONS. ITS POLICIES ARE NON-FORFEITABLE AND INCONTESTABLE.
President,
Vice-President,

Secretary and Treasurer,
HARRY F. WEST. GEORGE K. JOHNSON. HENRY C. BROWN.

J. T. JACKSON & CO., Real Estate Brokers,

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No. 711 WALNUT ST., PHILA.

GIRARD

TRUST CO.

LIFE INSURANCE

ANNUITY AND

Rents, Sales, Mortgages, etc., etc.

PETER WRIGHT&SONS

Xxecutes Trusts,

Allows Interests on Deposits,

Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent,

Cares for Real Estate.

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Historical Collections Relating to Gwynedd.
First Edition, 1885.--Second Edition, 1897. Octavo, 464 pages.

With 8. Illustrations, including 3 original Etchings, by
Blanche Dillaye. By Howard M. Jenkins. Office, 921
Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. Price, $4.00 net. (Postage,
23 cents.)

Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography.
“We have received a copy of the second edition of this valuable contribution
to our local history and genealogy. Within a few years after the issue of the first
edition, in 1884, it became exhausted, and the author has now responded to the call
for a second edition, which has long been wanted. .. The ramifications of the
families who settled at Gwynedd and vicinity are so extensive that in all probability
this edition will be exhausted as rapidly as the first.”

The Literary Era, Philadelphia.

(Genealogical Department, Edited by Thomas Allen Glenn.) “We believe that local histories seldom atttain the honor of a second edition, except when especially valuable as a strong sidelight upon the times they represent, or when they contain original genealogical material not obtaina ble elsewhere. Jenkins's book is rich in both elements, and shows evidence of laborious and scholarly research. The hool, trents of

Harriet WV Elohet interesting and picturesque evem, the settlement of the We.

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Mr.

Scenic Reading Route to

READING, HARRISBURG, GETTYS-
BURG, CHAMBERSBURG, SHAMO-

KIN, WILLIAMSPORT, AND POINTS

IN INTERIOR PENNSYLVANIA.

Penn" in The Evening Bulletin, Philadelphia. “On this work, when first published ten years ago, he had expended much research, and the result is a volume filled with all that is most interesting and worth knowing in the annals of the substantial Welsh race and their descendants who peopled this part of Montgomery county.”

W. W. H. Davis, Historian, in Doylestown Democrat. "We do not hesitate to say that Historical Collections Relating to Gwynedd ' is the most interesting township history we have met with."

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AND JOURNAL.

PHILADELPHIA, 921 ARCH STREET, SECOND MONTH 12, 1898.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY

we will

LARGE

PAPERS EXCEPT UPON

STOP ORDER OF SUBSCRIBER.

PoEM, ,

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Advertisements of “Wanted,” “For Rent,"

Publisher's Department. Friends Intelligencer Association, “For Sale," etc., 5 cents a line, each insertion. (LIMITED.) Seven average words make a line. No advertise.

** " I embrace every opening," says a valued friend ment inserted for less than 20 cents.

and correspondent in Ohio, " to commend the INTELLISINGLE SUBSCRIPTION, $2.00 PER ANNUM.

GENCER to our members, especially to such as are deTo subscribers residing west of the Mississippi River a discount of one-fourth from this rate, making the price FOR RENT: CHOICE OF TWO FURNISHED prived of the opportunity to attend our meetings. Its

cottages, in the heart of the Appalachians, thirty reading would surely tend to keep alive their interest in $1.50 per annum.

miles west of Asheville, N. C. A delightful all the year To those who get up and forward “ Clubs round climate, especially helpful in pulmonary and ner

the Society, and minister, besides, to their enjoyment.” give one extra copy, free, for each ten subscribers.

vous disorders. J. REÉCE LEWIS, Waynesville, N.C. Single copies, 5 cents,

CHEERFUL ROOM, WELL-FUR

We have copies in stock of each issue since New SUBSCRIPTIONS MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIMB.

nished, in private family, for rent. Address No.

Year, and can send to new subscribers the back num16, This Office. WHEN IT IS DESIRED TO DISCONTINUE, NOTICE MUST BE

bers to that date. GIVEN. WE DO NOT

WANTED: A YOUNG WOMAN TO SOLICIT
custom for a pure home-made article of food.

* I think the INTELLIGENCER indispensable to Salary and commission. Address No. 17, this Office.

every one imbued with Friends' principles,—which is OFFICES: 921 ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

WANTED.-INTELLIGENT COUPLE TO RUN only another name for Christian principles,”-says a small poultry farm on shares, near New York

friend writing from Indiana. ADVERTISING RATES.For transient advertise- city. Address I. X. L., This Office. ments, 10 cents per line, one time; 772 cents per line each insertion, two times; For longer insertion reduced rates, WANTED.-MARCH TWENTIETH, A SUITE *** In reference to advertisements of Wanted,” which will be furnished upon application.

West Philadelphia. Board in house. Friends' family where persons replying are requested to address a Num

preferred. References exchanged. Address, stating ber, at this Office, we may state, as we have frequently REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHECKS, terms, H. L. KIRK, 517 Chestnut Street.

done heretofore, that we undertake nothing more than (1) DRAFTS, or Post-OFFICE MONEY ORDERS; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of WANTED. A WOMAN FRIEND, AS .COM,

the insertion of the advertisement, and (2) the delivery of the person so sending. Draw checks and money

replies—written—to the advertiser. We cannot underorders to the order of FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER Asso- children. Apply to ANNA T. HOOPES, 341 East

take to give information as to the details of the adverCIATION, LIMITED. Biddle Street, West Chester, Pa.

tiser's wishes, or the qualifications, etc., of those replyWANTED: -A MAN, FRIEND) WISHES THE ing; in fact, to do anything more than what has just

been stated.
CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

mental derangement. First-rate city references. Address
12, this Office
,

*** We have copies of the Review of “ Hugh Wynne," A GOOD WORD EACH WEEK. VII., . 105 PARTIES DESIRING TO VISIT WASHINGTON can be accommodated with rooms and board in a

A

and will send, as before, to those desiring them. THE ETERNAL GOODNESS: WHITTIER'S

Friends' family. One block from street cars passing | stamp may be sent, when convenient. One cent will 105 railroad stations, Capitol, and public buildings. Terms,

carry three copies. $1.50 a day. JOHN RUSKIN. -—III. : BY JOHN WILLIAM

Address FRIEND, 1626 Nineteenth Street, N. W., GRAHAM,

106

Washington, D. C.

Announcement is made that Walter J. Buzby, for

some time with Mitchell, Fletcher & Co,, Philadelphia, THE CHARACTER OF JOSEPH : BY ELIZA

JOHN FABER MILLER,

and Edward C. Leeds, who has been in the real estate BETH H. COALE, . 108

and insurance business in Camden and Woodberry,

325 SWEDE STREET, NORRISTOWN, PENNA. RECOLLECTIONS OF ALEXANDER YOUNG, 109

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.

have purchased “ The Chalfonte," Atlantic City, N. J., FRIENDS' New TESTAMENT LESSONS.Practicing in Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.

from David and Joseph Roberts, and will reopen it on No. 8,

the 17th. The Chalfonte has been well known to readers Temperance Lessons, (Adult Classes), 110

JOSEPH T. FOULKE,

of the INTELLIGENCER, while under the charge of its ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,

late owners. FRIENDS AND SOCIAL QUESTIONS,

$ 623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia.

Offices: EDITORIAL:

Ambler, Montgomery Co., Pa. The Richmond Outlook,

II2 Notes,

YOUNG FRIENDS' ASSOCIATION BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS,

Will be sold on the premises of the late Abel J. Hop112, 113

The regular meeting of the Young Friends' kins, in New London Township, Chester County, Pa., COURSE OF FREE LECTURES, 113 Association will be held in the Lecture Room,

situated about three miles from West Grove, and two

miles from Kelton, on the P. & B. C. R. R., on THE RICHMOND CONFERENCES: NOTICE, 114 15th and Race streets, on Second-day evening, Second month 14, at 8 o'clock.

Fourth-day, Second Month 16, 1898. NEWS OF FRIENDS :

PROGRAM Purchase Quarterly Meeting, 114

(WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16th.) Notes,

I. An Illustration of the Work of the Litera-
114
ture Committee.

A FARM containing 27 acres, more or less, bounded NOTES FROM ISAAC WILSON.-I., 114

by lands of Joel Conard and others. A very desirable By ALMIRA P. HARLAN.

and productive farm, all under cultivation. About one FROM MARTHA SCHOFIELD : THE AIKEN

II. Corrupt Business Practices and Individual acre of asparagus, young peach orchard (trees, 1, 2, SCHOOL, .

115
Responsibility Therefore.

and 3 years planted), cherry trees and small fruit, large CONFERENCES, ASSOCIATIONS, ETC.,

By THOMAS H. SPEAKMAN. apple orchard of excellent fruit. The improvements con. 116

sist of a large brick house, roofed with slate and tin, well III. Obedience and Liberty. EDUCATIONAL,

built and in good repair, containing 13 rooms and excel117

By ALICE HALL PAXSON. lent cellar with vault; bath-room with modern conveniLITERARY NOTES, 117

ences and hot and cold water; porches, large lawn, with All are invited.

fine shade trees. This house is very prettily situated, COMMUNICATIONS :

ISABEL CHAMBERS, Secretary. hnd should be seen to be appreciated. Barn with ample Bible Selections, 117

shedding, 2-story hog-house, chicken, carriage, and tool

house, and corn crib, all in good repair. Ice house and POETRY: Arctic Lovers,

117

SWARTHMORE. pond, constant flow of spring water at barn. Any one METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY POR First

desiring a nice, cheery location for a home will do well to

For rent or sale, Queen Anne Cottage, 12 examine this property before purchasing elsewhere, and MONTH,

118
rooms, steam heat, and open fire grates. The

The will be shown over the same by Mary E. Hopkins, residTHE COLORING OF BIRDS' EGGS, 118 location is very delightful, directly overlooking ing thereon, or, T. C. Moore, West Grove, Pa.

Šale to commence at one o'clock, sharp, when condiCURRENT EVENTS,

the athletic grounds of the College, and very tions will be made known by 119

close to the meeting-house; one acre of ground, NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS,

TRUEMAN C. MOORE, I 20 and plenty of fruit. Apply to

Executor of Abel J. Hopkins, dec'd. NOTICES,

George B. Johnson, Attorney.
DAVID SCANNELL, 814 Arch Street:- John R. Strode, Auctioneer.

ΙΙο

III

PUBLIC SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE.

II2

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF LOUISA J. ROBERTS. WILLIAM B. Paxson.

WILLIAM B, PAXSON.

MAHLON B. PAXSON. Members of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange.

FREDERICK PAXSON & CO.,

Stock and Bond Brokers, 112 Custom House Place, Philada. Orders and inquiries by mail or wire receive prompt attention,

WATCHES.
As one of the oldest houses in the watch
trade - established three generations ago—and
up to date in every feature of the business, we
are able to offer the best and most serviceable
watches for the least money.

Give us a call.
GEO. C. CHILD,
1020 Chestnut St.-2d Floor.
Established 1810 at 824 North Second Street.

George School, NEWTOWN, BUCKS COUNTY, PENNA. Under the care of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends.

With Extracts from her Journal, and

Selections from her Writings. There are a few vacancies for children of Friends,

12mo., cloth, 286 pages, with two portraits. Price, (those with one parent a member are included).

$1.00, postage paid. GEORGE L. MARIS, Principal.

For Sale by

FRIENDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION,
Abington Friends' School,

S. W. Corner 15th and Race Streets, Philadelphia.
For BOARDING AND DAY PUPILS or Both SEXES.
Near Jenkintown, Penna., 10 miles from Philadelphia.

Under the care of Abington Monthly Meeting. Liberal JUST PUBLISHED.
course of study. Students prepared for college or busi-
ness. The home-like surroundings make it especially

NEW BOOKLETS.
attractive to boarding pupils. Students admitted when.
ever there are vacancies. Send for circulars to

Among the Rushes.
LOUIS B. AMBLER, Principal,

What is the World.
Or

Jenkiniown, Pa. CYNTHIA G. BOSLER, Sec'y, Ogontz, Pa.

Not Changed but Glorified.

Above are uniforın with
Swarthmore

Peter Noddy.
Grammar
Swarthmore, Pa.

Tommy's Friend.
School

The Seed and the Prayer.
Primary, Intermediate; High School,

What the Sparrow Chirps.
and College Preparatory Classes. Send
for catalogue containing particulars,

Light After Darkness.
references, and letters from parents.

My Times Are in Thy Hands. ARTHUR H. TOMLINSON, Principal.

Thou Art My God.

Making ten in the set. Price, 5 cents each;
Friends' Academy,

full set 45 cents. LOCUST VALLEY, LONG ISLAND.

FRIENDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION.
A Boarding and Day School for Boys and Girls, under
the care of Friends.

S. W. Cor. 15th and Race Sts., Philad'a.
Thorough instruction to fit for business or to enter
college. Board and tuition $150 per school
Building with modern conveniences.
For particulars, address
PRINCIPAL FRIENDS' ACADEMY,
Locust Valley, Long Island, N. Y.

WASHINGTON GLADDEN WRITES:

City and State is one of the three papers I read. Chappaqua Mountain Institute,

I never take it up without experiencing a vital

and I never lay it down without feeling that some A FRIENDS' BOARDING SCHOOL FOR

reinforcement has come to my courage and my moral enBOYS AND GIRLS.

thusiasm. You ought to have fifty thousand subscribers The building is modern, and the location is the hill

in Philadelphia. And if you had, Philadelphia would be country thirty-two miles north of New York City.

a different city very speedily.' For Circulars, address CHAPPAQUA MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE, City and State represents no party, faction, or

Chappaqua, New York. | clique, and is the organ of no society, league, or commit

tee. It always endeavors, however, to keep itself in
kindly touch and in the broadest sympathy with every

project and movement of honest men and women looking YOUNG FRIENDS' ASSOCIATION ROOMS, to the well-being of society. It aims to give the exact

truth on all matters relating to the welfare of the city and
140 N. FIFTEENTH STREET. State, free from bias or improper influence of any kind.
re-opened

Its motto is “Commonwealth above Party."
NINTH MONTH 27TH, 1897.
The rooms are open daily, except First-days, from
8.30 a. m. to 9.30 p. m., and Friends are cordially invited

City and State is issued weekly.
to avail themselves of the facilities afforded, those from Herbert Welsh, Managing Editor.
being particularly desired to do so.
The rooms are designed to be

One Dollar a year.
Five cents a copy.

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year. New

One of Three Papers .

thrill;

without the city and young Friends

, boarding in the city Publication office, 1305 Arch St., Philador

A CENTRE FOR INFORMATION ON ALL FRIENDLY

MATTERS..

WRITE FOR SAMPLE COPIES.

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Writing Papers,
Envelopes of every description
New City Hall Pencils, $1.75 a Gross.

YEO & LUKENS, 23 North 13th St.

STATIONERS. 316 Walnut St.

GEORGE B. COCK,

Stenographer,
14 S. Broad St., Philadelphia.

1.09.

DISTANCE.
TELEFHONE

Residence, 216 W. Coulter Street

1-42-25-D.

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rents of thought about art ; the idea of the one des- applicable to both, if warranted by the character of the images cribed in the phrase, “ Art for art's sake"-of the

or thoughts which each in their respective languages conveyed. other in, "Art the expression of life.” To the young

Take, for instance, one of the most perfect poems or pic

tures (I use the words as synonymous) which modern times men of the former school, (and I instinctively call themi have seen : ‘The Old Shepherd's Chief Mourner.' Here the young men, for that is what the present exponents of exquisite execution of the glossy and crisp hair of the dog, the the school suffer from being), subject is nothing, spirit,

bright sharp touching of the green bough beside it, the clear

painting of the wood of the coffin, and the folds of the blanket, aim and meaning are an intrusion, nothing matters but

are language, language clear and expressive in the highest beauty, mere color and line beauty—a wilting cabbage degree. But the close pressure of the dog's breast against the may afford as good a subject as Elizabeth Fry—it all wood, the convulsive clinging of the paws, which have dragged depends on tone, tint, composition, atmosphere, light,

the blanket off the trestle, the total powerlessness of the head,

laid close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed and tearful and so forth. Art therefore has no connection with

fall of the eye in its utter hopelessness, the rigidity of repose character, either with that of the artist who paints or which marks that there has been no motion nor change in the the nation who buys.

trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the coffin This theory, the very opposite of the theory of the

lid, the quietness and gloom of the chamber; the spectacles

marking the place where the Bible was last closed, indicating Greeks, is also the very opposite of Ruskin's. The

how lonely has been the life, how unwatched has been the degreat artist nation of history, like our teacher of to- parture of him who is now laid solitary in his sleep-these are day, valued art as the harmonious and beautiful ex- all thoughts—thoughts by which the picture is separated at pression of mind and feeling, and as a reliable index of

once from hundreds of equal merit so far as mere painting national temper.

goes, by which it ranks as a work of high art, and stamps its

author, not as the neat imitator of the texture of a skin, or the This very matter is the central trunk of Mr. Rus

fold of a drapery, but as the man of mind. Most pictures of kin's teaching, the truth from which his later work has the Dutch School, for instance, excepting always those of branched out. In "Modern Painters," and ever since

Rubens, Vandyke, and Rembrandt, are ostentatious exhibi

tions of the artist's power of speech, the clear and vigorous he has told us how Art must be noble if it be good

elocution of useless and senseless words, while the early efforts Art ; he has made peace (if you will indulge me in of Cinabue and Giotto are the burning messages of prophecy, an irrepressible tendency to metaphor) by bidding fair delivered by the stammering lips of infants.

The picture

which has the nobler and more numerous ideas, however awkArt to take strong Virtue to be her lord, receiving all

wardly expressed, is a greater and a better picture than that her sustenance from, and showing to him only all her which has the less noble and less numerous ideas, however perfectness, or (to come down into the language of beautlfully expressed.” prose and talk simply) the best men are needed to I need not say that this standard for art criticism is paint the best pictures, and a good man properly to not the one in favor now, even when not expressed in appreciate one. John Milton has a parallel doctrine the above absolute, uncompromising way. Mr. Whistabout his art. He who would not be frustrate of his ler's young lions in the “Speaker" and in the “Spechope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought tator” would never be able to write another word from himself to be a true poem, that is, a composition of the sheer gorge-filling contempt, were they present to hear best and laudablest things.” This statement about the above extract. For a quiet humble citizen like myRuskin's teaching will be evident if we examine his self, it is better to keep one's own counsel, and go on definition of greatness in art. It is in the forefront of admiring the pictures one likes. Perhaps the habit of his teaching, on pp. 7, 8, and 9 of the first volume of enploying as art critics painters with time on their " Modern Painters," and is well worth quotation for hands——" painters who have failed " is the unkind way its own sake :

of putting it-may have caused the present fashion of

glorifying exclusively the technical qualities of a canPainting, or art generally, as such, with all its technical

vas and despising "subject." ities, difficulties, and particular ends is nothing but a noble and expressive language, invaluable as the vehicle of thought,

But it being now clear that I am an old fogey, on but by itself, nothing. He who has learnt what is commonly art criticism, we will pass on to note the important considered the whole art of painting, that is the art of repre- connection between Mr. Ruskin's ideas about pictures senting any natural object faithfully, has as yet only learned

and his later work in the region of economics and the language by which his thoughts are to be expressed. He

ethics and education. For his view of art, as being has done just as much towards being that which we ought to respect as a great painter, as a man who has learnt how to ex- chiefly the expression of ideas, led him into dealing press himself grammatically and melodiously has towards being with those ideas, and so his subject expanded from art a great poet. The language is indeed more difficult of ac

till it embraced the whole of the life, duty, and characquirement in the one case: than in the other, and possesses

ter of the nian, and from the man concerned itself with more power of delighting the sense, while it speaks to the intellect, but it is, nevertheless, nothing more than language, and

the state which moulds him. (We say his theory led ail those excellences which are peculiar to the painter as such, him on this path, but it is more likely that his genius are merely what rhythm, melody, precision, and force are in

produced this theory, and he followed both.) the words of the orator and the poet-necessary to their greatness, but not the tests of their greatness. It is not by the

Ruskin has never swerved from the theory thús mode of representing and saying, but by whát is represented

laid down. In the fifth volume of "Modern Painters," and said, that the respective greatness either of the painter or he says, “In these books of mine, their distinctive the writer is to be finally determined.

character as essays on art, is their bringing everything Speaking with strict propriety, therefore, we should call a

to a root in human passion or in human hope." And man a great painter only as he excelled in precision and force in the language of lines, and a great versifier, as he excelled in he repeats in the Epilogue to "Modern Painters” precision or force in the language of words. A great poet written for the 1888 edition, the dictum of his Oxford would then be a term strictly and in precisely the same sense Lectures, that, “all great art is praise."

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