Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

the soul of a tourageous tnán, 'at least atrests bis thoughts in their passage to his lips. The suspicions of a good citizen, freeze those men, whom the calumný of the wicked could not stop in their progress.

You complain of their silence! You forget, then, that you have often established an insulting equality between them and men covered with crimes, and made up of ignominy.

You forget, then, that you have twenty times left them covered with opprobrium by your galleries.

You forgot, then, that you have not thought yourselves sufficiently powerful to impose silence upon these galleries.

What ought a wise man to do in the midst of these circumstances? He is silent. He waits the moment when the passions give way: he waits till reason shall preside, and till the multitude shall listen to her voice.

What has been the tacțick displayed during all these unions? Cambon, incapable of political calculation, boasting his ignorance in the diplomatick, flattering the ignorant multitude, lend ing his name and popularity to the anarchists, seconded by their vociferations, denounced incessantly as counter-revolutionists, those intelligent persons who were desirous, at least, of having things discussed. To oppose the acts of

union,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

union, appeared to Cambon an overt act of treason. The wish so much as to reflect and to deliberate, was in his eyes a great crime. He calumniated our intentions. The voice of every deputy, especially my voice, would infallibly have been stifled. There were spies on the very monosyllables that escaped our lips.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

LETTER, &c.

Beaconsfield, May 26, 1795.

MY DEAR SIR,

I

the entertainment of the house of lords, has been lately played by his Grace the **** of ******* a great deal at my expence, and a little at his own. I confess I should have liked the composition rather better, if it had been quite new. But every man has his taste, and his Grace is an admirer of antient musick.

There may be sometimes too much even of a good thing. A toast is good, and a bumper is not bad : but the best toast may be so often repeated as to disgust the palate, and ceaseless rounds of bumpers may nauseate and overload the stomach. The ears of the most steady-voting politicians inay at last be stunned with three times three. I am sure I have been very grateful for the flattering remembrance made of me in the toasts of the revolution society, and of other clubs formed on the same laudable plan. After giving the brimming honours to citizen Thomas Paine, and to

citizen

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »