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WHERE I WENT AND WHAT I SAW.

WHERE I WENT AND WHAT I SAW.

OUR TRIP TO FRANCE. We spent a peaceful and pleasant sabbath at Dover, and though the sun shone down upon the town in the valley between the high chalk hills, making it very hot, we all went twice to public worship.

Early on Monday morning my young friends made up their minds to have a peep at France. So breakfast over, we went to the station to go by train to Folkestone, and thence by steamer to Boulogne, which, we were told, was a large and handsome city, with many English people in it. But we were too late for the train, and so we walked to Dover pier, where we found a steamer almost ready to start for Calais.

I did not want to go at all. I confess that I thought I should like to say I had been in France, and yet I did not feel strong enough for the voyage. I would rather have gone to Boulogne that I might see the place from which it was said, when I was a boy, that Buonaparte was coming to invade and conquer England. But he never did.

However, I went with them, for I did not like to leave them. We had a very pleasant run across what they call the Channel, which is more than

WHERE I WENT AND WHAT I SAW.

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twenty miles wide. Every minute farther from England, we were nearer to France. At length we entered the river, and our vessel was brought to under the high pier, for the tide was low. On the pier were many police officers, soldiers, porters, and not a few boys and girls, full of fun, laughing at us, and jabbering French about us one to another.

We could not but admire how quickly all the luggage was removed from the steamer into large trucks on the pier, under the direction of a sharplooking old officer in a blue dress and a large cocked hat, who reminded me of the pictures we had in England sixty years ago of the old Buonaparte. Those of our party who were going further into France went off in carriages to the railway station, and their luggage was rolled away after them in the large trucks at a quick pace, pulled and pushed along by ten or twelve men.

We had no luggage, and so we walked slowly and quietly along the pier, where almost everything and everybody seemed new to us. Looking over the sands from the pier we saw what looked in the distance to be a dozen soldiers walking all abreast, and stepping along just as soldiers do. We waited until they came nearer, and who do you think they were ?

WHERE I WENT AND WHAT I SAW.

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Why, a troop of old yellow-faced French women with their dresses turned up higher than their knees, a long pole with a net at the end of it on their shoulders, and a bag wet and dripping behind their backs. Then we found that they had been down to the sea to catch shrimps.

Well: we walked on into the old city, through its great gateways in the walls, and over its bridges, and soon found our way into the spacious market place. Looking about for a coffee-shop we found one, the master of which could talk English. Here we were shown into an upper room looking into the market place, but without

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of the “ comforts” of an English parlour—no carpet on the floor but white seasand, no sofa to lie down on, rush bottom chairs, plain deal tables without any covers, on which they placed, without a tray or white cloth, our coffee, and rolls, and butter, and shrimps. But when we tasted the coffee it made amends for all. We never tasted such. We had heard before what good coffee the French made, and now we found it true. We all enjoyed it very much. It was just what we wanted after our voyage.

But I cannot tell you now where we went and what we saw during the rest of the day. You must wait a bit longer for that.

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AN OLD WELSH CHURCH. I TOLD you

that we saw a little church near Canterbury which some say is the oldest in England; it seemed to be like this in the picture.

But this is a picture of a small old church in Wales. It stands in a valley among the mountains, with very few houses near it, and is very likely more than a thousand years old, for the stone walls are very thick and strong.

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