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CONTAGION IN THRO AT TROUBLES.

THE medical editor of Babyhood writes: A recent case within our knowledge, in which fatal diph

theria developed upon what had been believed to be a simple quinsy, suggests a few words regarding the duty of isolatingany case of sore throat where there are other children in the house. Without entering upon any disputed points regarding diphtheria, it is generally agreed that the distinctive visible sign of it is its peculiar membranous deposit. A case may present clearly the conditions of a “common sore throat,” and subsequently diphtheria be unmistakably present. For our purpose it is unnecessary to discuss whether such cases are diphtheritic from the first or become so. The point for parents to know is that the sequence of dangerous symptoms upon those apparently slight is not uncommon, and that it is better for them to isolate a child fifty times unnecessarily than to be neglectful once.

We would urge, then, that, if at all possible, every child suffering from sore throat be isolated until it is distinctly convalescent. Physicians are often embarrassed, in urging the isolation of patients, by the timidity or suspiciousness of parents. If in such a Case as has been described the physician recommends the precaution of isolation, the family, if of the timid type, is at once thrown into a panic, assuming that the physician really considers that the case is diphtheria or that he expects it will prove to be, and that he is concealing the facts, while really he is only taking proper sanitary precautions.

Other persons, on the other hand, immediately interpret the physician's frank statement of his reaSons for isolating a supposed simple case as an evidence of want of knowledge on his part. They apparently think that to the properly educated physician diseases are as distinct and as easily discriminated as coins of different denominations. With such people the only course is to strongly advise isolation, and to give the reason for it, and to let them take the responsibility of neglecting the suggestion if they choose to do so. Intelligent people usually are grateful for the warning, even if it prove to have been unnecesSary, and although they sometimes chaff the physician as “fussy.”

ALCOHOL IN THE KITCHEN.—Of 622 moderate and immoderate drinkers with whom I have conversed, 337 tell me that they acquired the desire for wine and other alcoholic poisons by their use in articles of diet and in the family and social circle, dealt out to them by their wives and sisters and female friends. Of this number 161 cases were from the use of liquors in articles of diet. Of the whole number referred to, 328 fill a drunkard's, grave seventeen died of mania a potu and five by suicide.” These are the words of a physician who has made the subject a matter of careful study.—National Bulletin.

There are people who would do great acts but, because they wait for great opportunities, life passes, and the acts of love are not done at all.—F. W. Rol)ert307.

NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS.

—The German Bible for the blind costs $25, and consists of no fewer than sixty-four volumes. This is owing to the fact that the letters have to be very large, that they are in haut-relief, and can therefore be printed on one side only, and that the paper must be very thick. Some of the blind can read five or six hours without feeling fatigued. They use both hands in reading, the right forefinger being used chiefly to separate the words and syllables, while the left forefinger recognizes the word by itself.

—A safe that is pronounced a marvel of mechanism has just been finished for the National Bank of Scotland by a London firm. This immense money box, which is wholly of hard steel and weighs close upon 100 tons, consumed seven months' time in building, and has no less than fortyeight locks. Each door weighs a ton and the bolts thereon two hundred pounds apiece. The safe is said to be capable of holding five hundred and fifty million dollars in gold bullion.

—A train on the railway which ascends the Rigi Mountain, Switzerland, fell into a ravine last week. One person was killed and twenty-five were dreadfully injured.

—A foot of snow is reported from nearly all parts of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, blockading the railroads. There has been a light fall at Galena and Monmouth, Ill.

—A highly interesting lacustrine settlement, dating back to the stone period, has just been discovered at Acbon, on the Lake of Constance. Large quantities of stone, wood, and bone, together with the remains of bisons, cows, deers, etc., were found.

—It is practically settled that Georgia will have a School of Technology. The bill has passed both houses of the Legislature.

—Near California Mountain, in New Mexico, Major Powell of the Geological Survey has discovered what he pronounces to be the oldest human habitation upon the American continent.

—A recent telegram from Memphis says that “millions of squirrels are emigrating from the Mississippi side over to the Arkansas shore at a point commencing about five miles below Memphis and extending down for twenty miles. They are swimming the Mississippi river and evidently making for more elevated grounds in Arkansas. Thousand are being killed by farmers, who, by reason of their great numbers, use sticks instead of guns. A similar emigration of squirrels occured in 1872.”

—The flavor of pure perfumes is marvelous. A single drop of the oil of thyme will communicate its ordor to 25 gallons of water. One grain of ambergris will perfume papers for 40 years, and it has been ascertained that the 2,‘262,554,000th of a grain is sensible to the smell.

—A club of 4800 members in Berlin recently advo rtised for six medical officers to attend them at a salary of $375 per annum. This would make the contribution from each member of the club about 75 cents a year for medical attendance. More than 400 doctors applied for the place.

—Says the Christian Advocate : “Nothing is more foolish, nothing not absolutely vicious brings more misery in its trains, than spending all as we go. Indeed, where it is not the fruit of vice, it is often the parent of crime. “To lay up something for a rainy day,” “to put by 'for a time of need, are maxims of common prudence among all people, and of religion, too. ‘Take no thought for the morrow ’ does not mean, Do not save any money to provide for your wants in old age, to help good causes, to educate your children, to provide for your support if sick, to protect you against unforeseen accidents or losses or destruction of property. That Christ and His apostles never meant to be understood as inculcating from ‘hand to mouth,’ as some interpret their living words, is clear from their precepts and practice. The apostles, while Christ was with them, had a treasurer, who kept the hag.’”

—A manufacturer of Breslau, Germany, is said to have built a chimney over fifty feet in height entirely of paper. The blocks used in its construction, instead of being of brick or stone, were made -of compressed paper, jointed with silicious cement. The chimney is said to be very elastic, and also fire-proof. Picture frames are now made of paper on the Continent. Paper pulp, glue, linseed oil, and carbonate of lime or whiting, are mixed together and heated into a thick cream, which, on being allowed to cool, is run into moulds and hardened. The frames are then gilt or bronzed in the usual way.

—In the agricultural department of a library in Warsenstein, near Cassel, Germany, may be seen a most novel collection of books. At first glance they appear like rough blocks of wood ; but on closer examination it is found that each is a complete history of the particular tree which it represents. At the back of the book the bark has been removed from a space large enough to admit the scientific and the common name of the tree as a title. One side is formed from the split wood of the tree, showing its grain and natural fracture ; the other shows the wood when worked smooth and varnished. One end shows the grain as left by the saw, and the other the finely polished wood. On opening the book one finds the fruit, seeds, leaves, and other products of the tree, the moss which usually grows upon its trunk, and the insects which feed upon the various parts of the tree. To all this is added a well printed description of the habits, usual location, and manner of growth of the tree—all forming a complete history of each kind of timber represented, and in a form readily understood.—N. Y. Post.

CURRENT EVENTS.

SIxTY Chinese cigar makers in the factory of Koenigsberger, Falk & Meyer, at San Francisco, struck on the 23d inst., because the firm refused to discharge its white workmen. It is said the Chinese Union organized the strike.

THE Rolling Mill Company, of Passaic, New Jersey, has just completed a draw span 432 feet long for the Minnesota and North-western Railroad, at St. Paul. The draw span, which is said to be the longest in the world, will be operated by steam.

A MAN in Fort Worth, Texas, has contracted with an English syndicate to deliver on the wharf at Galveston fortnightly, for the next five years, 3000 frozen carcasses of beef cattle. The price is 6 cents per pound for the beef and 9 cents for the hides, and the shipments are to begin.

AN unofficial footing made in Cincinnati of the official returns from all the counties in Ohio shows that Foraker has a plurality of 18,158 for Governor. Leonard, the Prohibition candidate, polled 28,064 votes, and Northrop, the Greenback candidate, 2963.

THE authorities in Montreal still meet with much opposition in the work of isolating small-pox patients. On Firstday a carter named Trepanier called a number of his neighbors to his assistance, and together with the mob drove offa posse of sanitary police which had come to remove one of the carter's children to the hospital. At another house to which the officers went for a similar purpose a man drew a knife “and kept them at bay until he was reasoned out of his folly.” Forty-one deaths were reported on the 23d inst.

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Express on week-days, 3.20, 4.35, 5.00, 5.45, G.50, 7.30, 820, 8.30, 11 and 11.15 a.m. (Limited Express 1.14 and 4.50 p.m.), 12.44, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6.30, 7.10, 7.40 and 9.16 p.m., and 12.01 night. On Sundays, 3.20, 4.35, 5, 5.45, 8.30 a.m., 12.44, 4 (Limited Express, 4.50), 6.30, 7.10 and 7.40 p.m. and 12.01 night. For Brooklyn, N. Y., all through trains connect at Jersey City with boats of “Brooklyn Annex,” affording direct transfer to Fulton Street, avoiding double ferriage and journey across New York City. Express for Boston, without change, 6.30 p.m. daily. For Sea Girt, Spring Lake, Ocean Beach, Ocean Grove, Asbury Park and Long Branch, 8.00 and 11.30 a.m., 2.44, 3.30 and 4 p.m. on week-days. Saturdays Only, 5 p.m. Sundays, 8 a.m. (does not stop at Ocean Grove and Asbury Park). For Freehold, 5 p.m., week-days. Daily except Sunday: Express for Easton, Delaware Water Gap, Söranton and Binghamton, 8.00 a.m., 12.01 noon and 6.00 p.m. For Scranton and Water (lap, 4.00 p.m. FROM KENSINGTON STATION, FRONT AND NORRIS STS. For New York, 6.50, 7.40, 8.30, 10.10 and 11.15 a.m., 12.05, 2.10, 3.15, 4.55, 5.35, 6.10 and 11 p.m. on week-days. On Sundays, 8.25 a.m. Daily except Sunday : . Express for Easton, Delaware Water Gap, Scranton and Binghamton, 7.40 a.m., 12.05 noon and 5.35 p.m. For Scranton and Water Gap, 3.15 p.m. FROM MARKET STREET WHARF. Express for New York, via Camden and Trenton, 9.00 a.m. on week-days. Express for Long Braneh and intermediate stations, 8.30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday8, 7.30 a.m. Trains for Trenton, connecting for New York, 6.20, 7.30, 10.30 a.m.,

12 noon, 2.30, 3.30, 4.30, 5.30 and 7.00 p.m. On Sundays, 6.45 p.m. PHILADELPHIA, WILMINGTON AND BALTIMORE

RAILROAD.

TRAINS LEAVE NEW BROAD ST. STATION. For Baltimore and Washington, 12.20, 3.45, 7.20 9.10, 10.16 a.m., 12.05 noon, 12.30 (Limited Express), 4.02 and 6,03 p.m. For Baltimore only, 5.05 and 11 p.m. On Sunday, 12.20, 3.45, 7.20, and 9.10 a.m., and 6.03 p.m. For Baltimore only, 11 p.m. For Richmond, 12.20, 7.20 and 12.05 noon (Limited Express, 12.30 p.m.) On Sunday, 12.20 and 7.20 a.m. Sleeping-car tickets can be had at Broad and Chestnut Streets, 838 Chestnut Street and Broad Street Station. The Union Transfer Company will call for the check baggage from hotels and residences. Time-cards and full information can be obtained at the station and at the following No. 838 Chestnut Street. S. E. Corner Broad and Chestnut Streets. No. 4 Chelten Avenue, Germantown. NO. 324 Federal Street, Camden. J. R. WO

TICKET OFFICES :

CHARLES E. PUGH,

General Manager. General Passenger Agen

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LEWIS 98 per cent. LYE.

(Patented) PO IFTDERED AND PERFUMED.

The STRONGEST and PUREST Lye made. Will make 12 lbs. of the best perfumed hard soap in 20 minutes WITHOUT BOILING. It is the best for disinfecting sinks, closets, drains, etc. Photographers' and machino ists' uses. Foundrymen, bolt and nut ma- d | kers. and anti-incrustator. For brewers and bottlers, for washing barrels, bottles, etc. For painters, to remove old paints. For Washing trees, etc., etc.

PENNA. SALT MFG. CO.,

Gen. Agts., Phila., Pa.

THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND. AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE, DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE YOUNG.

TERMS, $1.50 A YEAR, IN ADVANCE. EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS:—“I still regard THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND as one of the purest and freshest contributions to juvenile literature.” “I hope your important and valuable enterprise of providing mental food for the young, may meet with the best success,” Address,

M. Y. HOUGH, 102() Arch Street, Phila., Pa.

Our Healthful Honne.

INVALIDS can enter this pleasantly situated Sanatorium at any time for treatment. Our accommodations are first-class. We have soft spring water, dry, invigorating, air, fine walks and drives, with the advantages of both city and Collntry. Dr. A. SMITH is very successful in o the sick, with his comprehensive system of medical treatment. Invalids cannot find a better home. Terms reasonable: send for circulars. Address,

A. SMITH, M. D.,
OUR HEALTH FUI, HOME, Reading, Pa.

No. 908

For Engineers, as a boiler-cleaner

FRIENDS' WEDDING INVITATIONS. Send for Samples.
ARCH STREET, DIX ON PHILADELPHIA, PEN.

Furniture, Bedding, Curtains.

PARLOR, DINING ROOM, LIBRARY AND CHAMBER FURNITURE, CURTAINS AND FURNITURE COVERINGS MATTREsses, BEDs, FEATHERs, SPRINGS, SPRING COTs, ETC., ETC.

Nos. 21 and 23 N. Tenth Street, and 912 and 914 Race Street, Phila.

CLOTHS AND CASSIMERES.

A Nice Assortment always on hand suitable for Plain and Fashionable Garments.

PLAIN COAT'S A SPECIALTY.

GUSTAVUS GOLZE, MERCHANT TAILoR, 109 N. Tenth Street, Philadelphia.

WHAT $5.00 WILL BUY.

IF $5.00 is sent us, either by Registered Letter, Postal Note, Bank Check, or Post-Office Order, we will send any one of the following orders:–Order No. 1; We will send 6 pounds of good Black, Green, Japan or Mixed Tea, and 18 pounds of good mild or strong roasted Coffee. Order No. 2; We will send 30 pounds of good mild, or strong roasted Coffee. Order No. 3.; We will send 5 pounds of real good Black, Green, Japan or Mixed Tea, and 15 pounds of fine mild or strong Toasted Coffee. Order No. 4; We will send 25 pounds of real good mild or strong roasted Coffee. Persons may club together and get one of these orders, and we will divide it to suit the club, sending it all to one address. To those who wish to purchase in larger quantities, we will sell at a still further reduciion. The Tea and Coffee will be securely packed and sent by express or freight, whichever is ordered. Samples of any of the above orders will be sent free by mail to examine. In ordering, please state whether Order No. 1, 2, 3 or 4 is desired. Call on or

address, WM. INGRAM & SON, TEA DEA LERS, 31 N. Second Street, Philadelphia.

No Charge.

VA.

FRIENDS MARRI AGE CERTIFICATES, Correctly and Handsomely Engrossed.
GIRARD LIFE INSURANCE, ANNUITY AND TRUST CO. OF PHILADELPHIA.

NO. 2030 CHESTNUT STREET. INSURES LIFES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, COMMITTEE OR RECEIVER, AND RECEIVES DEPOSITS ON INTEREST.

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INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRA-
TOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.
All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the Assets of the Company. r
President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY, Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN, Vice-President and Actuary, ASA S. WING, Manager of In-
surance Department, JOS. ASHBROOK, Trust Officer, J. ROBERTS FOULKE.

Reuben Wilson

* * *

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TONITED WITH

The Friends’ journal.

PHILADELPHIA, ELEVENTH MONTH 7, 1885.

PUBLISHED WIEEKLY BY THE

FRIENDS INTELLIGENCER ASSOCIATION

(LIMITED.)

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PUBLISHERS' NOTICES.

***Correspondence of every description for the INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL, should be addressed to it, (or to Howard M. Jenkins), at 921 Arch Street. John Comly’s address will hereafter be at 15th and Race Sts., and correspondence for him relating to Friends' Book-Store, or other of his business affairs, should be addressed there.

*** The office of THE INTELLIGENCER AND Journal, heretofore at 1020 Arch St., is now at 921 Arch Street, (2nd floor.) All correspondence, whether for the editors or on business, is requested to be addressed here; and in general persons having business with the paper will procure its transaction here.

For the accommodation of any who may find it more Convenient to pay their subscriptions at the book-store of Friends' Book Association, arrangements have been made by which it will act as Our agent to receive them. The store is now at 1020 Arch, but will be removed, at a future date, to 15th and Race Streets.

*** Matter intended for insertion in the INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL should reach us by Third-day evening, though notices or advertisements relating to affairs of immediate importance may be used as late as the forenoon of Fourth-day. In order to reach our distant subscribers, the paper is now mailed on Fifthday, and must be closed at noon of the day preceding.

*** No charge is made for publishing ordinary notices of marriages and deaths; on the contrary, we are very willing to receive and print them. Obituary notices we reserve the privilege to curtail or amend, and it is desired that brevity and suitability may always be carefully kept in view in their preparation.

*** A watchful supervision is exercised over the advertisements in this paper, and none which are not entitled to credit will be knowingly admitted. Advertisements of a low or doubtful character are, of course, rigidly excluded. The value of our advertising space is by this oversight materially enhanced, as the appearance of an announcement in the paper is, to a certain extent, evidence of its trustworthiness.

*** Attention of our subscribers is called to the fact that we can supply other publications, in connection with the INTELLIGENCER AND Journal, at a discounted rate. We will take Orders for a limited list of reputable periodicals, (weeklies and monthlies), and will furnish the rate of charge to any who wish to know with the view of ordering. Persons making up their lists of reading for 1886 should take this opportunity of reducing the cost.

BAR GAINS.

1020 ARCH STREET.

BOOKS, STATIONERY AND FANCY ARTICLES AT HALF PRICE.

FRIENDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION having removed their

store from No. 1020 Arch St. to S. W. Cor. 15th & Race Sts.,

is selling the remainder of stock at the old stand, at FIFTY per cent. discount from regular marked prices.

JOHN COMLY, SUPERINTENDENT.

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