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CURRENT EVENTS.

THE deaths in this city last week numbered 337, which was 24 less than during the previous week and 7 morc than during the corresponding period last year. The main causes included 41 by consumption, 15 by croup, 9 by diphtheria, and 17 by typhoid fever.

IT is reported that Dr. Gregory, of the U. S. Civil Service Commission, intends to resign at an early date. This would leave Judge Thoman alone in the board.

DR. BRAKELEY, President of the New Jersey Cranberry Association, reports the crop of cranberries in New Jersey to be “unprecedented.” One bog of six acres, alone, in Burlington county, has yielded 1904 bushels. The berries have escaped injury by frost.

THE autumnal exhibition of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will open at Horticultural Hall, (Broad street), Philadelphia, on Third-day of next week, the 6th instant, and continue until Sixth-day inclusive. The hall will be open from 10 A. M. to 10 P.M., and a great number of fruits and vegetables will doubtless be shown. The society's chrysanthemum show will take place at the hall on the 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th of next month.

BRYN MAWR College, for women, the institution founded by the great bequest of Dr. Joseph W. Taylor, of Burlington, N. J., was formally opened on the 23d ult. A large company connected with the institution, or invited to attend, were present. The exercises included addresses by President Gilman, of Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore, and President Chase, of Haverford, and James Russell Lowell also spoke somewhat briefly. Francis T. King, of Baltimore, the President of the Board of Trustees, was too unwell to attend ; his place was filled by Philip C. Garrett. The grounds and buildings were thrown open to inspection, after the exercises. There are about 40 students to begin with, some of them pursuing advanced courses of study.

FORTY-EIGHT deaths from small-pox were reported in Montreal on last First-day, and eight in the suburbs. A member of the Citizens' Committee of Montreal said that there were at least 4000 cases of small-pox in the city. The opening of the Theatre Royal has been indefinitely postponed on account of the epidemic. The health officials are encountering the most determined opposition, and serious riots have occurred. *

THE Secretary of the Treasury has appointed five physicians as sanitary inspectors on railroad trains entering the United States from Canada. He has also directed the officers of the Customs on the Canadian frontier to aid the Sanitary inspectors of the Marine Hospital service and similar inspectors acting under State authority as far as practicable without interfering with their regular duties.

A LEADING Mormon, “Bishop’’ John Sharp, has pleaded guilty of polygamy, in the courts at Salt Lake City. He was fined $300, and then, upon payment, was discharged. He said the “plural marriage” in question “was entered into before there was any statute against it in good faith, according to his religion, but he recognized the supremacy of his adopted country’s laws and would live within them henceforth.”

AGENT Gossman informs the Commissioner of Indian Affairs that he has notified all the settlers on the Crow Creek Indian reservation to quit in accordance with the President's proclamation, and he thinks they will obey. The Commissioner says the settlers must leave the reservation “even if it requires the whole force of the military to accomplish their removal.”

A NUMBER of Indian agents have been appointed, including Charles Hill, of Nebraska, at the Santee Sioux agency in Nebraska, vice Wm. H. Spaulding, declined; and Moses Neal, of Kansas, at Sac and Fox agency, in the Indian Territory, vice Isaac A. Taylor, resigned.

—Canon Frederick W. Farrar, who preached the sermon on General Grant's funeral day, in Westminster Abbey, and who is well known as the author of several important Teligious works, is now in this country, having reached Quebec on the 13th of last month. He is to lecture in sev eral cities during the present month, his appointment in Philadelphia being for Second-day next, the 5th inst., at the Academy of Music, in the “Star Course.”

SIR WILLIAM Fox, ex-Premier of New Zealand, has arrived in Toronto, “for the purpose of inquiring into the means adopted by Canadians to combat intermperance and the liquor traffic, as they intend in New Zealand to inaugurate an anti-liquor crusade.”

AT Madras, (British India), the municipal authorities have extended the right of suffrage to women.

IRISHMEN in this country in sympathy with the Nation al League movement in Ireland, headed by Chas. Stewart Parnell, have undertaken to raise funds to pay members of Parliament, who may be elected in the interest of the League, and who otherwise could not afford to serve. “Boycotting” has much increased in Ireland, and many tenants demand large reductions of rent—usually 25 or 30 per cent. —refusing to pay anything where the reduction is not granted.

DISASTROUS floods, covering an area of 3500 square miles, have occurred in the presidency of Bengal, the largest and most populous of the twelve main divisions of British India. A great amount of property has been destroyed and numbers of lives lost.

FALSE POINT, in the Bay of Bengal, which was thought to have the best harbor between Calcutta and Bombay, safe, and roomy and accessible to all ships, was struck by a storm wave on the 22d. inst., and swept so completely that most of the inhabitants perished. The victims number 300. Many vessels were wrecked.

A LETTER has been received in Quebec from Father Fourmand, director of the St. Laurent Mission, on the Saskatchewan river, giving a terrible account of the hunger and destitution among the Indians in consequence of the burning of their houses and plundering of their property during the Riel rebellion, and the killing, flight or imprisonment of the male population. The women and children are without food or clothing, and are told by the Government agents to expect no more provisions.

MT. PLEASANT SCHOOL : A CKNOWLEDGMENT.

The following receipts since last report, for Mt. Pleasant, S. C., School, are acknowledged:

Robt. Biddle $25.00 E. M. and M. Davis g 5.00 Isaac and L. M. Stephens 20.00 John Williams e o - e 20.00 Isaac and Mary P. Kinsey Milton 20.00 Conyers Button e - e 25.00 Mrs. C. Button 10.00 A Friend 50.00 Enoch Lewis * o 50.00 E. B. Hilles, Wilmington 20.00 Mary H. Wood o o - o e - - 25.00 Friends of Westbury, L. I., per Stephen R. Hicks 54.50

Total o & * $364.50 o'clock. Girard avenue is at the same hour. It is to be Previously acknowledged 291.00 hoped that Friends will be stimulated to manifest their in

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terest in our Society, by the attendance of these as well as the morning sessions.

The First-day schools will also be resumed at Race street after meeting, and at the others at 9 A.M., excepting Spruce street where there is no such school.

The participation of all in this important work is solicited, not only our young people but the fathers, mothers and other adults should seek to draw closer together and aid in strengthening and rebuilding the walls of our heritage.

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ME, YN E N & O'O Mp A. NY, Artists - and Photographers.

S. W. COR. FRANKLIN & GREEN STS., PHILADA.

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AMOS HILLBORN do CO., Furniture, Bedding, Curtains.

PARLOR, DINING ROOM, LIBRARY
AND CHAMBER FURNITURE, CUR-
TAINS AND FURNITURE CoverINGs
MATTRESSES, BEDs, FEATHERs,
SPRINGS, SPRING COTs, ETC., ETC.

Nos. 21 and 23 N. Tenth Street, and 912 and 914 Race Street, Phila.

J O S E PH L. J O N E S,
M O N T G O M E R Y CO UN TY MIL K.

CONSHOHOCKEN DAIRIES.
OFFICE: 603 N. EIGHTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

Special Attention given to Serving Families.

WHAT $5.00 WILL BUY.

IF $5.00 is sent us, either by Registered Letter, Postal Note, Bank Check, or Post-Office Order, we will send any one of the following orders:—Order No. 1; We will send 6 pounds of good Black, Green, Japan or Mixed Tea, and 18 pounds of good mild or strong roasted Coffee. Order No. 2; We will send 30 pounds of good mild, or so Coffee. Order No. 3; We will send 5 pounds of real good Black, Green, Japan or Mixed Tea, and 15 pounds of fine mild or strong roasted Coffee. Order No. 4;. We will send 25 pounds of real good mild or strong roasted Coffee. Persons may club together and get one of these orders, and we will divide it to suit the club, sending it all to one address. To those who wish to purchase in larger quantities, we will sell at a still further reducacked and Sent by ex

tion. The Tea and Coffee will be securely
press or freight, whichever is ordered. Samples of any of the
above orders will be sent free by mail to examine. In ordering,
please state whether Order No. 1, 2, 3 or 4 is desired. Call on or

address,
WM. INGRAM & SON, TEA DEALERS,
31 N. Second Street, Philadelphia.

FRIENDS' WEDDING INVITATIONS. Send for Samples. No Charge.

No. 90s ARCH street, DIX ON PHILADELPHIA, PENNA

FRIENDS' MARRIAGE CERTIFICATES, Correctly and Handsomely Engrossed.

GIRARD LIFE INSURANCE, ANNUITY AND TRUST CO. OF PHILADELPHIA. NO. 2030 CIIESTNUT STREET. INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, COMMITTEE OR RECEIVER, AND RECEIVES DEPOSITS ON INTEREST.

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INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.

All"Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the Assets of the Company.

President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY, Vice-
Reuben

11SOIl

~ 5

sident op wrot AR BROWN, Vice-President and Actuary, ASA S. WING, Manager of In{ROOK, Trust Officer, J. ROBERTS FOULKE.

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UNITED WITH

The Friends' journal.

PHILADELPHIA, TENTH MONTH 10, 1885.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE

FRIENDS INTELLIGENCER ASSOCIATION

(LIMITED.)

TERMS.–PAYABLE IN ADVANCE : One copy, one year, ... $2.50 || 8 copies, one year, $2.25 each. Single numbers, . 5 cents 30 copies, one year, $2.00 each. SUBSCRIPTIONS MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIME.

OFFICES: 921 ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

ADVERTISING RATES. For transient advertisements, 10 cents per line, one time, 7% cents per line each insertion, two times. For longer insertion reduced rates, which will be furnished on application.

REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHECKs, DRAFTS, or POST-OFFICE MONEY ORDERs ; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of the person so sending. Æol)raw checks and money orders to the order of Helen G. Longstreth, Treasurer.

Entered at the Post-Office at Philadelphia, Penna., as SecondClass-matter.

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

POETRY: LIFE MOSAIC, . - o - s - e - . 545
THE NARRATIVE OF LOT'S WIFE, . - o o o - . 545
INDIANA YEARLY MEETING, . to - o * e o . 546
PHILADELPHIA YEARLY MEETING TEMPERANCE WORK, . . 548
WHAT IS TRUE CIVILIZATION ? g o e o * - . 549
THE TEMPERANCE PLEDGE, . e - o - o - . 550
THOUGHTS, e o e • e - o - o - . 551
EDITORIALS:
Women in The Church, . e - * - o o . 552
Our Standard of Trade or Business, . - . - . 552
MARRIAGES AND DEATHS, . - o - to c & e . 553
THE SCHOFIELD SCHOOL, - te o e e - - . 553
REFLECTIONS UPON THE TEMPERANCE CENTENNIAL CONFER-
ENCE, . o to o e e g: - o * . 553
DR. BENJAMIN RUSH AND ANTHONY BENEZET, . o - . 554
ATTENDANCE OF MEETINGS, . so - e - . . . . 556
THE USE OF TEXT BOOKS, o e - e & . 556
POETRY : The Lily; The Conditions; Little Feet, . - . 557
THE LIBRARY, . y * - s o o - * o . 557
SWARTHMORE, . • o - o o e e o to . 558
ORTHODOX FRIENDS, e - e - e - o - . 558
THE WOODS IN EARLY AUTUMN, . * o e t- - . 559
COMBINE THE FORCES, . • e e e - o o . 560
SWEETNESS AND FEATHERS, . e - • - e - o U}
NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS, . o e * e o • ?)
CURRENT EVENTS, . & - o - o t • . vi.

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PUBLISHERS' NOTICES.

*** The Office of THE INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL, heretofore at 1020 Arch St., is now at 921 Arch Street, (2nd floor.) All correspondence, whether for the editors or on business, is requested to be addressed here; and in general persons having business with the paper will procure its transaction here.

For the accommodation of any who may find it more convenient to pay their subscriptions at the book-store of Friends' Book Association, arrangements have been made by which it will act as Our agent to receive them. The store is now at 1020 Arch, but will be removed, at a future date, to 15th and Race Streets.

*** Attention of our subscribers is called to the fact that we can Supply other publications, in connection with the INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL, at a discounted rate. We will take orders for a limited list of reputable periodicals, (weeklies and monthlies), and will furnish the rate of charge to any who wish to know with the view of ordering. Persons making up their lists of reading for 1886 should take this opportunity of reducing the cost.

*** A watchful supervision is exercised over the advertisements in this paper, and none which are not entitled to credit will be knowingly admitted. Advertisements of a low or doubtful character are, of course, rigidly excluded. The value of our advertising space is by this oversight materially enhanced, as the appearance of an announcement in the paper is, to a certain extent, evidence of its trustworthiness.

***NOTICE.-Henry Tagg, now or formerly at 708 Locust St., Philadelphia, is not an agent of the INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL, and is not authorized to act for us in any capacity.

Friends' Home for Children, 4011 ASPEN STREET, W. PHILA.

Arrangements have been made for their Third Annual Trip to Mauch Chunk and Switch Back, Third-Day (Tuesday,) 10th Mo. (October) 13th, 1885. Trains for the Hudson and Switch Back leave Ninth and Green Sts., 7.30 A.M., stopping at Columbia. Avenue, 16th Street, Tioga, Wayne Junction and Jenkintown. Tickets good from Manayunk, Germantown and intermediate Stations, and for either Trip.

ADULTS, $2.50. CHILDREN, $1.25.

A MOS HILLBORN do CO., Furniture, Bedding, Curtains.

PARLOR, DINING ROOM, LIBRARY AND CHAMBER FURNITURE, CURTAINS AND FURNITURE COVERINGS MATTRESSES, BEDs, FEATHERS, SPRINGS, SPRING COTs, ETC., ETC.

Nos. 21 and 23 N. Tenth Street, and 912 and 914 Race Street, Phila.

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Express on week-days, 3.20, 4.35, 5.00, 5.45, 6.50, 7.30, 8.20, 8.30, 11 and 11.15 a.m. (Limited Express 1.14 and 4.50 p.m.), 12.44, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6.30, 7.10, 7.40 and 9.16 p.m. and 12.01 night. On Sundays, 3.20, 4.35, 5, 5.45, 8.30 a.m.; , 12.44, 4 (Limited Express, 4.50), 6.30, 7.10 and 7.40 p.m. and 12.01 night. For Brooklyn, N. Y., all through trains connect at Jersey City with boats of “Brooklyn Annex,” affording direct transfer to Fulton Street, avoiding double ferriage and journey across New York City. Express for Boston, without change, 6.30 p.m. daily. For Sea Girt, Spring Lake, Ocean Beach, Ocean Grove, Asbury Park and Long Branch, 8.00 and 11.30 a.m., 2.44, 3.30 and 4 .m. on week-days. Saturdays Only, 5 p.m. Sundays, 8 a.m. does not stop at Ocean Grove and Asbury Park). For Freehold, 5 p.m., week-days. Daily except Sunday: Express for Easton, Delaware Water Gap, Scranton and Binghamton, 8.00 a.m., 12.01 noon and 6.00 p.m. For Scranton and Water Gap, 4.00 p.m. FROM KENSINGTON STATION, FRONT AND NORRIS STS. For New York, 6.50, 7.40, 8.30, 10.10 and 11.15 a.m., 12.05, 2.10, 3.15, 4.55, 5.35, 6.10 and 11 p.m. on week-days. On Sundays, 8.25 a.m. Daily except Sunday: , Express for Easton, Delaware Water Gap, Scranton and Binghamton, 7.40 a.m., 12.05 noon and 5.35 p.m. For Scranton and Water Gap, 3.15 p.m. FROM MARKET STREET WHARF. Express for New York, via Camden and Trenton, 9.00 a.m. on week-days. to * * Express for Long Braneh and intermediate stations, 8.30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Sundays, 7.30 a.m. Trains for Trenton, connecting for New York, 6.20, 7.30, 10.30 a.m., 12 noon, 2.30, 3.30, 4.30, 5.30 and 7.00 p.m. On Sundays, 6.45 p.m.

PHILADELPHIA, WILMINGTON AND BALTIMORE PAILROAD.

TRAINS LEAVE NEW BROAD ST. STATION. For Baltimore and Washington, 12.20, 3.45, 7.20 9.10, 10.16 a.m., 12.05 noon, 12.30 (Limited Express), 4.02 and 6,03 p.m. For Baltimore only, 5.05 and 11 p.m. On Sunday, 12.20, 3.45, 7.20, and 9.10 a.m., and 6.03 p.m. Baltimore only, 11 p.m. to go For Richmond, 12.20, 7.20 and 12.05 noon (Limited Express, 12.30 p.m.) On Sunday, 12.20 and 7.20 a.m. Sleeping-car tickets can be had at Broad and Chestnut Streets, 838 Chestnut Street and Broad Street Station. The Union Transfer Company will call for the check baggage from hotels and residences. Time-cards and full information can be obtained at the station and at the following No. 838 Chestnut Street. S. E. Corner Broad and Chestnut Streets. No. 4 Chelten Avenue, Germantown. No. 324 Federal Street, Camden. J. R. WOO

General Passenger Agen

For

TICKET OFFICES :

CHARLES E. PUGH, General Manager.

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