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FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER ASSOCIATION

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*** On and after 10th mo. 1st, the office of THE INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL, heretofore at 1020 Arch St., will be at 921 Arch Street, (2nd floor.) All correspondence, whether for the editors or on business, is requested to be addressed there; and in general persons having business with the paper will procure its transaction there.

For the convenience of those who may prefer to pay their subscriptions at the book-store of Friends' Book Association, arrangements have been made by which it will act as our agent for that purpose. The store is now at 1020 Arch, but will be removed, at a future date, to 15th and Race Streets.

SUBSCRIPTIONS MAY BEGIN AT ANY TIME.

ADVERTISING RATES.

For transient advertisements, 10 cents per line, one time, 772 cents per line each insertion, two times. For longer insertion reduced rates, which will be furnished on application.

REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHECKS, DRAFTS, or POST-OFFICE MONEY ORDERS; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of the person so sending.

*** Attention of our subscribers is called to the fact that we can supply other publications, in connection with the INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL, at a discounted rate. We will take orders for a limited list of reputable periodicals, (weeklies and monthlies), and will furnish the rate of charge to any who wish to know with the view of ordering. Persons making up their lists of read. ing for 1886 should take this opportunity of reducing the cost.

*** Communications should be addressed and payments made to JOHN COMLY, AGENT, at the Publication Office, No. 1020 Arch Street.

Entered at the Post-Office at Philadelphia, Penna., as second

class-matter,

** The paper is now mailed early enough, (about 24 hours sooner than it was), to reach all subscribers except those very remote, before First-day. As we presume that this is most satisfactory to them, we shall be glad to know of any points the paper does not reach so early.

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

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*** In answering advertisements in this paper, either personally or by letter, please name this paper. This will be to the advantage of all parties concerned

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AMOS HILLBORN & Co.,

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POETRY: THE UNANSWERED PRAYER,
THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS: ITS SPIRIT AND FORM,
THE PATHWAY OF PROGRESS,
A CHAPTER FROM A HOSPITAL DIARY,
OATHS AND THE TEMPERANCE PLEDGE,
EDUCATION: PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS,
EDITORIALS:

The Work of Rebuilding,

The Southern Colored People,
DEATHS,
SWARTHMORE COLLEGE, .
NEWS OF FRIENDS:

Minute of the Representative Committee,
Haddonfield Quarterly Meeting,
Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia,
Visiting in Western Quarter, .

Notes, .
HELEN HUNT JACKSON,
POETRY :

We Mean to do It,

My Legacy,
THE FIRST-DAY SCHOOL:

The New Lesson-Leaves,

Thorough Work,
ORTHODOX FRIENDS,
WOMEN PHYSICIANS IN INDIA,
THE ORIOLE'S SONG,
NEWS AND OTHER GLEANINGS,
CURRENT EVENTS,
NOTICES,

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THE UNION TRUST COMPANY,

611 and 613 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, $1,000,000 PAID-UP CAPITAL,

$500,000 Acts as Executor, Administrator, Assignee, etc., alone or in connection with an individual appointee. Executes trusts of every description known to the law. All trust assets kept separate from those of the Company. Burglar-Proof Safes to rent at $5 to $60 per annum. Wills kept in Vaults without charge. Bonds, Stocks and other valuables taken under guarantee. Paintings, Statuary, Bronzes, etc., kept in Fire-Proof Vaults. Money received on deposit at interest.

JAMES LONG, President; JOHN G. READING, Vice-President; MAHLON H. STOKES, Treasurer and Secretary ; D. R. PATTERSON, Trust Officer.

DIRECTORS. --Jas. Long, Alfred S. Gillett, Joseph Wright, Dr. Charles P. Turner, Wm. S. Price, John T. Monroe, W.J. Nead, Thos. R. Patton, John G. Reading, Wm. H. Lucas, D. Hayes Agnew, M.: D., Jos. I. Keefe, Robert Patterson, Theodore C. Engel, Jacob Naylor, Thomas G. Hood, Edward L. Perkins, Philadelphia; Samuel Riddle, Glen Riddle, Pa.; Dr. George W. Reiley, Harrisburg, Pa., J. Simpson Africa, Huntingdon; Henry S. Eckert, Reading i Edmund S. Doty, Mifflintown; W. W. H. Davis, Doylestown ; R. E. Monaghan, West Chester : Charles W. Cooper, Allentown.

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BLATCHLEY

zers.

PUMP!

BEST

This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS of LIFE and ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at actual NET
COST. It is PURELY MUTUAL; has ASSETS of nearly TEN MILLIONS and a SURPLUS of about Two MILL-
IONS. HITS POLICIES ARE NON-FORFÈITABLE AND INCONTESTABLE.
SAMUEL C. HUEY, President.

HENRY C. BROWN, Secretary.

WM. H. JONES, The Dealer in Agricultural Implements, Seeds and Fertili

Removed to 2043 and

2045 Market St., Phtladelphia, THE

Pa. Cheapest and largest variety. Every conceivable implement of farm use, harness, seeds and fertilizers. It is a curiosity, and of great interest to every utilitarian

to see the establishment. If you LATCHLEY'S

cannot get here, write for wants

I am in communication with all TRIPLE ENAMEL

the Agricultural implement buil

ders in the U. S.

ALWAYS A SPECIAL BARGAIN ROOM,
OR SEAMLESS TUBE
COPPER-
LINED
Do not be argued into buying inferior

IN WM. HEACOCK,
goods when you can get THE BEST
for the same.money.

C. G. BLATCHLEY,
308 MARKET ST., Philadelphia.
For sale by the best houses in the trade.

No. 1508 Brown Street,

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PORCELAIN-LINED

, UNDERTAKER,

MANUFACTURER,

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Best Quality, Carefully Prepared. Delivered in Chute Wagons. AQUILA J. LINVILL, (late of Truman and Linvill), 1244 North Ninth Street.

TRADE MARK

FOR SALE:-ONE OF THE FINEST FIVE

Acre Building Sites in the vicinity of Media. Situate on the Providence Great Road, half-way between Wallingford and Me. dia. No improvements. Apply to

ISAAC L. MILLER,

705 Walnut Street, Philadelphia.

Contains the Life and Essence of Animal Bones. We are now selling Baugh's Strictly Pure Raw Bone Meal, also Baugh's Ready Dissolved Pure Animal Bones, at very low prices. It would surprise farmers to know how very low they can procure these brands from us.

Send your name and address, and we will mail you

our PHOSPHATE GUIDE. BAUGH & SONS, 20 S. Del. Ave. Philada., Pa.

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BY MARIA UPHAM DRAKE,

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constant disobedience of all its promptings, the conTHE UNANSWERED PRAYER.

stant yielding to evil passions.

Such a doctrine was far in advance of the age in
IWAS long ago,

which it was propounded and was regarded as little
When I was young. Alas! I did not know

less than seditious. The world could not believe that A better way. I said, “It must be so,

a people who, in vulgar parlance, “declared themOr God cannot be good.”

selves as good as anybody else," would obey any laws. Alas! alas ! my poor, weak, human pride!

Especially the authorities could not believe they How differently would I have quickly cried

would make good citizens when they refused to pay If I had understood !

tithes and war taxes, to take the oath of allegiance, And now I bear

or to doff the hat, or bow the knee to the king. It A thankful heart for that unanswered prayer;

took long years to prove that Friends were the most And so I think it will be when, up there

law-abiding of men; that the principles of peace which Where all is known,

forbade their contributing to defray the expenses of We look upon the things we longed for so,

war also forbade their quarreling among themselves; And see how little were they worth, and know

kept them from drunken brawls and duels. Their How soon they were outgrown,

refusal to pay tithes was because of their belief in an - Christian Union. individual, not a state religion, and was a step in the

direction of religious toleration. This was going beTHE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS: ITS SPIRIT AND yond the Puritans, who, when they later obtained reITS FORM.1

ligious freedom for themselves in the American colT was about the middle of the seventeenth centu

ony, denied it to others.

The refusal of the Friends to remove their hats ry, that a poor apprentice in Derbyshire felt called upon by the spirit of God to go and preach was a slight thing, yet it brought upon them trouble against the tyranny and corruption of the times. and persecution. To them it was the symbol that all Through trials and temptations, through imprison- men were equal; to the world, it was a despising of ments and persecutions, he steadily obeyed the voice authority. In the same way their use of the plain within, and slowly gathered around him a band of language gave offense. The Friends said, “ It is not like-minded men and women, who called themselves

the truth to address one person as if he were a conFriends. This is the origin of the Society of Friends pany; to use you instead of thou; to call a man, masor Quakers.

ter, or a woman mistress, when you do not so regard Quakerism was a reäction against the wickedness them.” This scrupulousness they doubtless carried of the court, the scandalous worldliness of the Estab- too far, but who was harmed thereby? lished Church, and the narrowness of the non-con

Besides their language, their dress distinguished formists. It was a cry for purity, fraternity, and

them. By the plainness and neatness of their garb, equality ; a plea for religious reform with toleration; they set an example to all of cleanliness and sobriety. a demand for the rights of man as man in the church

And it must have been a striking example if such a as well as in the commonwealth. It taught that the man as Voltaire would remark upon it. Their dress only authority over a man was the spirit of God which also served as a safe-guard against temptation, for the was in him, “the Light that lighteth every man that wearer was often arrested by the thought of the incometh into the world.” In accordance with this consistency between it and his behavior. The Friends idea of personal liberty and responsibility the Friends

carried their love of simplicity to their meeting adopted no written creed; their Discipline is merely houses, and the conduct of the meetings

. The land a guide for the conduct of meetings, and the regula

on which the house stood was not consecrated, for tion of outward behavior.

the whole earth was good in the sight of the Lord. They believed that the spirit of God was in all

The inside of the house was whitewashed; the floor men, independent of race, sex or condition; and that was filled with benches; there was no pulpit, but the the only means by which it could be removed was the

elders sat in raised seats facing the rest.

At their worship there was no presiding clergy1 An essay read at Vassar College, Sixth Month, 1885, by Lucy Davis, of the graduating class.

man, no religious ceremonial. The Friends met in a

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