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GIRARD LIFE INSURANCE, ANNUITY AND TRUST CO. OF PHILADELPHIA.

NO. 2030 CHESTNUT STREET.

INSURES LITES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, GUARDIAN,

TRUSTEE, COMMITTEE OR RECEIVER, AND RECEIVES DEPOSITS ON INTEREST. INCORPORATED 1836. CHARTER PERPETUAL.

CAPITAL $150,000.

SURPLU'S, $827,338.
(By Report of State Insurance Department, 1880.)
President, JOHY B. GARRETT.
Treasurer, HENRY TATNALL.

Actuary, WM. P. HUSTON.

THE PROVIDENT LIFE AND TRUST COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA.
409 CHESTNUT STREET.

CAPITAL $1,000,000, FULLY PAID.
INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRA-

TOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC.

All Trust Funds and Investments are kept separate and apart from the Assets of the Company. President, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY, Vice-President, T. WISTAR BROWN, Vice-President and Actuary, ASA S. WING, Manager of In

surance Department, JOS. ASHBROOL ust Officer, J. ROBERTS FOULKE.

Reuben Wilson

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THE Fall and Winter Term of this Institution will commence on the 14th of Ninth Month, (September) next.

The school has a healthy and beautiful location, with extensive grounds, and has been uniformly successful since its establishment, twenty-five years ago.

The advantages of an Academical and Collegiate education are fully secured, and diplomas are granted.

Terms, $180.00 per school year.

For illustrated Circular, and Catalogue giving full particulars address the principal, RICHARD DARLINGTON, PH.D.,

West Chester, Penna.

ADVERTISING RATES.

.

For transient advertisements, 10 cents per line, one time, 772 ents per line ea

line each insertion, two times. For longer insertion reduced rates, which will be furnished on application.

REMITTANCES by mail should be in CHECKS, DRAFTS, or POST-OFFICE MONEY ORDERS; the last preferred. Money sent us by mail will be at the risk of the person so sending.

SWARTAMORE COLLEGE.

*** Communications should be addressed and payments made to JOHN COMLY, AGENT, at the Publication Office, No. 1020 Arch Street.

Thirty minutes from Broad Street Station, Philadelphia. Under the care of Friends, but all others admitted. Full college course for both sexes; Classical, Scientific and Literary. Also a Preparatory School. Healthful location, large grounds, new and extensive buildings and apparatus. For Catalogue and full particulars, address, EDWARD H. MAGILL, A. M., PRESIDENT,

Swarthmore, Pa.

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

417

417

418

DEPTFORD SCHOOL.- FOR BOTH SEXES.

419

419

WOODBURY, NEW JERSEY. The Fall Term of this School will open 9th month 7th, 1885. Fur Circulars and further particulars, address, HENRY R. RUSSELL, PRINCIPAL,

Woodbury, N. J.

420

421

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MY FAITH : POEM,
LIFE IN FRIENDS' MEETINGS,
RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION FOR CHILDREN,
THE SIXTH QUERY,
MEETINGS “IN THE POWER OF GOD),"
THEODORE PARKER TO YOUNG MIN,
THE FRENCII IN MADAGASCAP,
NEWS OF FRIENDS :

Abington Quarterly Meeting,
Friends at Bloomfield, Canada,
Monthly Meeting of Friends, of Philadelphia,
Standford Quarterly Meeting,
Visiting in Bucks Quarter,

Committee Visit at Stroudsburg,
EDITORIAL:

Sympathy,
DEATHS,
THE NATURAL BRIDGE OF VIRGINIA,
A MOUNTAIN VILLAGE,
COMMUNICATIONS :

Note from (ieorge H. Braithwaite,

Total Abstinence a ('entury old,
POETRY:

My ('ail,
The Wild Rose,

Belief,
NEGRO SELF-EDICATION IN ALABAMA.
THE USE OF TOBACCO,
THE INDIAN PROBLEM,
THE LIBRARY:

Sunderland P. Gardner's Sermons,

Obituary Memoir of Mary S. Michener,
CURRENT EVENTS,
NEWS AND OTHER GI EANINGS,
NOTICES,

424

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by 9th mo. 1st. Prefers going where there are small children. Capable of taking entire charge of such. Best reference exchanged. For particulars call or address, A. H. V., this office. ders taken and executed with promptness.

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LAD

ADIES' FINE SHOES, HAND-SEWED. OR

JOHN A. M. PASSMORE,

S. DUTCHER,

915 Spring Garden St., Phila.

POTTSVILLE, PENNA.

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ligious visit). Our Elders had expressed themselves MY FAITH.

as willing that concerned Friends should read, if I TRUST in God : whatever ills

there was anything of a religious character which Around my pathway fall,

rested with them, and which they felt a desire to Whatever clouds obscure my sun,

share with the meeting. This desire was felt by two God sends and guides them all.

individuals at different times. On each occasion the I am not wise to frame a creed,

impression was felt while reading at home, that the Or talk of things divine:

matter which had refreshed and enlightened the I know not where, 'twixt good and ill,

reader, would be perhaps profitable to the meeting, To draw a boundary line.

and following this impression, these books were

carried to the meeting, to await further indications of I cannot tell what saints shall fill

the divine finger. After a period of solemn silence, His glorious courts above: Ionly know this one blest truth

in which the preparation of the heart seemed to be That God is boundless love.

accomplished, it was felt right to present the matter

to the meeting, and I believe in each case there were And, knowing this, I cannot fix

after expressions of satisfaction. One article read The limit of his grace, ,

was a sermon of Elias Hicks, which proved truly ediOr tell what souls have strayed beyond

fying. To our young folks who have so many tempThe light of his dear face.

tations in the way of attractive reading, and who do So in my faith I rest content,

not feel inclined to read Friends' books, this was Where'er my lot may fall:

strong meat, satisfying both mind and heart, and they I cannot wander far from Him

listened to our good reader with attention and inWhose care is over all.

terest. -Selected.

I believe that in many of our small meetings,

especially where there is little outward ministry, For Friends' Intelligencer and Journal.

an occasional reading, always as one may feel LIFE IN FRIENDS' MEETING.

truly impressed, and subject to our good order, of a

few verses or a psalm, or a chapter from the Bible, or ing, as each individual, must do its own work, possibly the reading of a hymn of Whittier's, or one of not looking too much at others, yet I believe the true the many heartfelt hymns from the good of all ages,) experiences of one may be valuable to another.

would have a tendency to centre many minds who In regard to the exercises in our meetings, I think find difficulty in collecting wandering thoughts, and we may lose by adhering too strictly to the customs of entering into silent worship. I believe there are few the recent past, and by fear that by doing some little individuals in our society to whom this feature, unusual thing we may help to start a precedent that (silent worship), is so dear as to myself. Without would be troublesome. In this fear, I think we some- that all other ministry seems to fall upon unprepared times lose what might prove to be fresh springs of ground; and I trust all our meetings may always life. If each meeting and each individual in it is

preserve this.

Where this meets the need of all, truly concerned to know the right for themselves, there is of course no need of any teacher or help, but and willing to accept the Christ in the way of his ap- as Elizabeth Fry truly says, it is a "high spiritual atpearing, not rejecting him because he does not come tainment,” not easily reached at once by all. in the expected way, we may safely trust each other Many of the valuable sermons and letters, and to follow his leadings. If we should do anything journals of our ancient worthies will remain a sealed which should be uncomfortable to the meeting, and book, if we wait for the young to take them down which did not bear evidence of being in the truth, we from our book-shelves, voluntarily or otherwise, and have the same remedy that we have for those who read them. The truths contained are generally of claim to preach by inspiration, but whose communi- universal application, and if we are careful and cations do not "savor of divine life.”

watchful in doing the right thing at the right time, To illustrate: During the past few months our many souls may be richly fed. When we are tempted little meeting has been most of the time without our to overdo, if we are on the watch we will feel a acknowledged minister, (he being absent on a re- check that will preserve us. We are

We are “set in a large

THOUGH I am feeling persuaded that each meet

place," and may “walk at liberty," if our faces are in the right direction and we are in cendescension to the right order of the meeting. Bear in mind, I say, "some” meetings, and “occasionally." I would not have this regularly, nor in any sense a form. If it is not spontaneous and under the same influence as other ministry, it will not tend to the life of the meeting. I believe, too, that our meetings should not sit too much in judgment upon each other, but should trust each other to that power which has promised to “teach His people Himself.”

The attempt to force individuals or societies into moulds has always resulted in death. Truth escapes all bounds, and must be free. It is contained in no formula, can not be confined in its movements, and bears with it always its own witness. Let each meeting feel the responsiblility for its own life, and when each becomes a living one, the society will take on a renewed existence. There is surely a need still of a cburch with “clean hands."

Let us purify ourselves from the evil practices of the present day. When the “ best people," so miscalled, indulge in games of chance for stakes in their own parlors; when they attend races and venture money upon the racing animals; when they can pass the wine cup to their neighbor, frequent places of amusement whose acknowledged tendency is demoralizing; then there is need of a people whose sentiments and whose lives are a standing protest. If we cannot make aggressive movements against such evils, we can at least endeavor to stand in opposition, and thereby prove perhaps an "object lesson" in our community. There is always need of a pure people whose lives bear witness to the truth.

H. A. P. Chicago, 7mo. 25th.

freighted with great responsibility. There is a class of sensitive moralists" that grieve over the fact that their children, by unavoidable intercourse with their companions, their classmates at school, and also from the books they read, receive ideas and impressions, which, when their child asks if they are true, the parent cannot conscientiously say he believes they are, and he often cannot decide what it is best to say. Sometimes it would be as far from right to say they are not true as that they are. Even the convictions of the parent it is not always best to express. Better say “when thou art a little older we will discuss these matters." When the young intellect becomes capable of understanding what is meant by symbolism and metaphor, many thin's may be made measurably clear, especially, by those who adopt the view and custom of Friends in explaining much as figurative.

George Eliot says, “Imagine the sorrowful amaze of a child, who had been dwelling with delight on the idea that the stars were the pavement of heaven's court, and that there above them, sat the kind but Holy God, looking like a venerable Father who would smile on his good little ones—when it was cruelly told, before its mind had substance enough to bear such tension, that the sky was not real, that the stars were worlds, that even the sun could not be God's dwelling, because there were many, many suns. This would introduce atheism into the child's mind, instead of assisting it to form a nobler conception of

The idea it previously had was perfectly adapted to its intellectual condition, and formed, to the child, as perfect an embodiment of the all-good, all-wise, and all-powerful, as the most enlightened philosopher ever formed for himself.”

This is an illustration of the fancies of the dear child, which, to its mind, are pictures most real. The skill of the instructor is here required in introducing science, to make the tender student feel rather than know, that the brightness and beauty and vastness of the sun and stars are typical of these qualities in the all-good, all-wise, and all-powerful, whose love is without limit, whose kindness is immeasurable, to which the good, in all periods of life, may turn with confidence, and receive the reward of well-doing, which is inward peace and joy. The greatest height attained by scientist, psychologist or philosopher does not enable him to give any clearer exposition of "that which is not ourselves," than the idea which forins itself in the mind of the thoughtful child. The consciousness that we are all humble learners in a great school, the most elementary lessons of which we scarcely know, should modify the annoyance of those who presume to say, with absolute decision, that many statements and theories in this field of thought, ure or are not the truth.

RACHEL A. LAMBORN.

God.

For Friends' Intelligencer and Journal.

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION FOR CHILDREN.

THAT

THAT there should be more mental activity and

acumen in childhood is one of the inevitable results of the advancement of civilization and culture; and as a consequence the best methods of training the young mind, and the kind of instruction it is right to give, especially upon re igious subjects, become problems more difficult of solution. The ideas of Friends in reference to religious instruction seem very simply and easy of practical application. It has been, and I think, still is, their theory to have no creed, consequently to teach none, to teach no dogma, no tradition. The plain principles of right and wrong are readily understood at a very early age, and parents with discretion and judgment, generally succeed in implanting good principles and forming correct habits in their children. This training and care of the moral element in human nature, the development of which, as well as of that of the intellectual, can be understood and aided in their definite capabilities, needs close attention and earnest effort. In the wonder-world when the little mind is slowly awakening to the perception of the inexplicable, and the imagination begins to build its infantile creation, the task of those who guide this being, itself inexplicable, becomes more difficult, more

True charity makes no noise in the world. A person who does good out of pure motives never spreads it abroad in the circle in which he moves, nor makes it public through a newspaper.--Géorge Eliot.

CONSCIENCE is the voice of God in the soul.-Beecher.

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