Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

and his employees in a short time, but we rejoice to know it was all accomplished and the papers forwarded to Washington in due time. “ Isaiah Light her lias again sent in his resignation. to take effect when his successor is appointed. Charles Hill, who has been employed at the Agency as farmer for many years and is a member of our Society, has applied for the vacant position and we have used our endeavors to have him appointed. The Santee an Pooca Indians have made wonderful progress toward civilization under the indefatigable labor and Christian care of Agent Lightner, yet they are measurably in a state of transition, and to have an Agent inexperienced and indifferent to their interests placed over them at this time would le productive of deploralle results, hence we have felt it to be our duty to urge the appointment of Charles Hill, but as yet we have no intinuation that he will be appointed. “The Executi e Committee were requested to oxamilie the act of Congress providing for a sale of the lands of the Sacs and Fox and Iowa tribes of Indians it, Nebraska, and if need be, render such assistance as will secure these Indians their just rights. “They were a 'so instructed, when opportunity of. fers, to convey to President. Cleveland and the Secretary of the Interior and Indian Commissioner Atkins the high appreviation we entertain for the liberal policy inaugurated by the present Administration toward the Indians. “Some Friends continue to cherish an earnest interest in the establishment of a school by our Society for the education of Indian children. The subject being introduced by the reading of the m inutes of our last meeting in Baltimore, on consideration the desire was expressed that the concern might remain lively with Friends, and, if sufficient onc uragement was afforded, they might hold themselves in readiness to render assistance in that direction or in ally other way that may open for the action of Friends, thus sustaining our ancient reputation as true friends of the Indian race. ** Baltimore Friends informed the Convention that they have been furnishing Agent Lightner with funds each year to enable him to procure delicacies for the sick and infirm Indians and some comforts for the school children in addition to what the Government furnishes, and as several of the Yearly Meetings have not had any special charge of Agencies for some time past, it was suggested that the Convention appropriate fifty dollars ($50) for the above-named purposes, which was united with and our treasurer was directed to forward that amount to Isaiah Lightner. “'Then adjourned to meet at the call of the Secretary. LEVI R. BROWN, Secretary.”

[blocks in formation]

loss by resignation an i disownment gives, on an average of the last four years, a gain of 164 per annum. There are 315 meetings and 5 629 habi'ual attenders, non members. There is a constant loss, owing to the children of Friends marrying out of the Society.

—A report which was considered “very striking” was received in London Yearly Meeting from the Western Quarter of England. Herefordshire and Radnorshire Monthly Meeting had nearly trebled its membership in three years; 99 persons had been received by convincement in the last three years, all were abstainers. The revival began with a series of meetings in some of the old meeting-houses. That at Almeley, built by Roger Pritchard in 1660, was reopened last year, and 23 members, with double that number of attenders, now meet in it. Pales, a meeting long kept up by one solitary attender, an old man on crutches, now numbers 63 members, two of them acknowledged ministers. “The influx is the result of the persistent work of twenty-five years past, although this was long in showing much fruit. It is an agricultural district, and was fruitful in sufferers in the early days of the Society.” ”

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Situated in a beautifully undulating and wooded part of North-East Herefordshire, about midway between Worcester and Leominster, and on a little branch line of its own connecting it with the former town, is the little market town of Bromyard, containing some 1 500 souls. It is one of those too numerous places, that possesses a closed meetinghouse—closed save for an annual meeting which has been kept up by Friends from Leominster for some years past. The said meeting-house is a quaint but comfortable edifice, situated as ancient meeting houses are wont to be, down a long narrow passage off the main street of the town.

A few Friends having a desire to see what could be done to resuscitate the meeting, with the co-operation of the one resident Friend, arranged a series of meetings, for, as the bills announced –Gospel Service, Christian Fellowship, and Bible Study—which very correctly describes the character of the meetings.

John Albright, Hannah Pumphrey, Frank Dymond,

Caroline W. Pumphrey, and John Henry Pumphrey, were all by turns in twos and threes present, F. D. and H. P. being present most of the week.

There were little gatherings in the morning, and two public meetings, one at 3 and one at 8 P. M. on each of the two First-days, and a public meeting at 7.30 each week-night. They commenced with an attendance of about forty and steadily increased to eighty which was as many as the room would comfortably hold. We believe they were felt by all present to be good and solemn meetings, and many expressed a desire that they should be continued on Sundays if not on week nights, in which desire the Friends who were present at the concluding meeting so heartily united, that they announced that the meetings on Sundays would be continued, trusting that some other Friends may be drawn to assist in the work. Many social visits were paid to the attenders, and Frank Dymond and Hannah Pumphrey, by invitation, paid separate visits to Buckenhill, the residence of a gentleman who at his own cost maintains and educates fifty boys from Dr. Barnardo's Homes preparatory to their going out to Canada. Some of the elder boys were present at several of the meetings. The workers trust that the effort that has been put forth will not have been in vain.— The Friend (Eng.

ITEMS.

PHYSICAL instruction is to be introduced into the New York public schools after the German method.

THE young volcano discovered about one vear ago ten miles south of Santa Maria, Cal., is still burning.

THE brooklyn bridge is proving a profitable financial venture. In two years it has eat ned nearly $1,C00,000, and is increasing its earnings steadily.

THE entire Chinese collection at the New Orleans Exposition has been presented to the University of Michigan at A inn Arbor.

THE Postmaster General has received a copy of the Postal Convention providing for the exchange of money orders between the United States and Japan. ratified by the Japanese postal authorities. The new treaty will go into effect on October first.

NOTICES.

A Meeting of Friends will be regularly held at the house of Thomas'T. Hilliard, Cape May Point, N. J., on First day mornings, at 10.30 o'clock. until Ninth month 27th. All interested Eriends are cordially illvited.

Friends' Meeting at Atlantic City, N. J.. at she house of Elizabeth Newport, on Pacific Avenue, at 10.30 A. M., on First-day mornings.

A Conference on Temperance, under the care of the Quorterly Meetings' (loimomittee, will be held at Fair. Hill Meeting-house, on First-slav, the 12th inst... at the close of the 111 ceting, about 4 I’. M. All are invited.

On Third-day, the 14th inst. thore will be an Excursion front Philadelphia to Ocean City and Sea Isle (“ity for the benefit of Friends' Home for ("hildren. Fare $1 for the round trip, for adults. Trains le ve foot of Market street at 7 and 8.15 A. M. Returning leave Ocean City at 5 and 7 P. M.

We have no agent in Philadeliblin. a titlı orizod to receipt for us, for advertisements but John Comly, or his c'erks.

The Friends' Intelligencor Association, T, imited.

HowARD M. J.ENKINS, Chairman.

[blocks in formation]

This work, from the press of O. Hutchinson, of New York, comes before us for notice, bearing upon its title page for one of its mottoes, the words of Jesus to his disciples: “Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.” The author tells us that his little book is intended for the perusal of those who dare to think for themSelves. The spirit of inquiry is at this time very preValent in the religious world, and he believes it a hopeful sign of the times, and looks for the best results o the earnest, candid search for truth now preVal 11ng. He seems to recommend a reverent study of the natural World as a means of becoming better acquainted with its Creator. The study of the Bible, which he denominates the word of God, he believes to be also a potent means of attaining to a knowledge of the highest wisdom. But he recognizes that many passages are not “profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, or for instruction in righteousness,” and Consequently cannot be held “to be inspired of God.” “God is love,” and all Scripture that does not breathe opirit of love or promote good works cannot be of O(|. The perfectness of the law of God, which is the law of love all may well understand even now ; perfect in design and execution, perfect in adaptation to all conditions of being, perfect in the certainty of its rewards and penalties, and it is perfect, converting the soul. This law of God he speaks of here seems to be the rules of life and conduct that may be formulated from the Scriptures, and the laws of the regulation of the natural world that are revealed by the study of nature. Of course we do not entirely agree with this “ Amateur theologian '' in regard to the real and highest law of God of which man “an have cognizance. The Quaker has ever held that there is a true light which lighteth every man who cometh into the world. This is a supernatural light and grace given to man for his guidance, and it may be well considered superior to any other means of salvation. This light, Øispelling darkness, products faith. It is the light of Christ, a saving and sufficient light. We hold also that when through sin and transgression this light in the soul grows dim—for only the "ure in heart can “learly discern this erfect guiding light, he may, as did the Psalmoist on like occasion. beseech the eternal goodness and mercy. “Open miné

oves that I may behold the wonderful things of thy

law.”

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Richakos's shoultos, Wism immi Pio Baton, CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS, so

[ocr errors][merged small]

The Largest, Best and Most Productive Early Blackberry, 3% inches around, from Seed of Selected Wilson's Early.

KIEFFER HYERID

PEAR TREES,

PHILADELPHIA. JO BIBING ATTENDED TO, S. R. RICHARDS, THOMPSON SHOURDs, 1OO ,OOO P each Tr ees, No. 1541 N. 12th St. No. 2212 Wallace St.

Strawberries, Blackberries, Grapes, Etc.

AMOS HILLBORN & C0., CATALOGUE WITH COLORED PLATES, FREE.

- VVII air al-A-IMI IFAIRIERY, FURNITURE, PARRY P. O., N. J.

BEDDING,
CUIRTAINS, &e. SPCsIEEE, IEEE In- orcDNTIEis,

Montgomery County Milk,

Parlor, Dining Room, Library and Chamber
Cernish-oh-oclzero. The iries,

Furniture, Curtains and Furniture OFFICE, 603 N. EIGHTH ST., PHILA.
Coverings, Mattresses, Beds, Special attention given to serving families.

[ocr errors]

&C., &C CHINA MATTINGS.—The Handsomest Assortment we have ever shown. • 9 o A Complete Assortment of *ś *Brussels, Tapestry Brussels and Ingrains. BOD - .00 to $1.25. TAPESTRY Nos. 21 & 23 N. Tenth Street and |o: p Opposite THO's. C. LIPPIN coor'T, WANAMAKER’S. I307 Market Street.

ires- ei2 & ei2. Race street. Froiladelphia.

This Company furnishes ALL DESIRABLE FORMS of LIFE and ENDOWMENT INSURANCE at actual NET COST. It is PURELY MUTUAL ; has ASSETS of nearly TEN MILLIONS and a SURPLUS of about TWO MILLIONS. gay-Its policies are NON-FORFEITABLE and INCONTESTABLE." so

SAMUEL C. HUEY, President. HENRY C. BROWN, Secretary.

THE UNION TRUST COMPANY.,

611 & 613 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA.

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL - - - - - - - - - - $1,000,000. PAID UP CAPITAL - - - - - - - - - - - - - $500,000

Acts as Executor, Administrator, Assignee, etc., alone or in connection with an individual appointee. Executes trusts of every description known to the law, All trust assets kept separate from those of the Company. Burglar-Proof Safes to rent at $5 to $60 per annum. Wills kept in Vaults without charge. Bonds, Stocks and other valuables taken under guarantee. Paintings, Sta'uary, Bronzes, etc., kept in Fire-Proof Vaults. Money received on

deposite at interest.

Offi JAMES LONG, President; JOHN G. READING, Vice President; MAHLON H. STOKES, Treasurer and Secretary; D. R. PATTERSON Trust
CôI’.
DIRECTORS:—James Long, Alfred S. Gillett, Dr. Charles P. Turner, William S. Price, John T. Monroe, W. J. Nead, Thomas R. Patton, John G.

Reading, James S. Martin, D. Hayes Agnew, M D., Jos. I. Keefe, Robert Patterson, Theodore C. Engel, Jacob Naylor, Thomas G. Hood, Edward L.

Perkins, PHILADELPHIA; Samuel Riddle, GiEN RIDDLE, Pa.; Dr. George W. Reiley, HARRISBURG, Pa.; J. Simpson Africa, HUNTINGDoN ; Henry S.

Eckert, READING; Edmund S. Doty, MIFFLINTown; W. W. H. Davis, Doy LEstown; R. E. Monaghan, WEST CHESTER; Charles W. Cooper, ALLENTown.

GIRARD LIFE INSURANCE, ANNUITY AND TRUST CO.
OF PHILADELPHIA,
2O3C CIE C. Eiso to NITU's - gE;" "I RIEEEE" Co-

INSURES LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE COMMITTEE OR RECEIVER, AND RECEIVES DEPOSITES ON INTEREST.

IN CORPORATED 1836. CEIARTER PERPETUAL. CAPITAL, $450,000. SURPLUs, $827,338.
(By Report of State Insurance Department, 1880.)
President, John B. Garrett. . Treasurer, Henry Tatnall. Actuary, William P. Huston.

THE PROVIDENT LIFE AND TRUST COMPANY,

OF PHILADELPHIA,

4-O9 CHESTNUT STREET.

Capital, $1,000,ooo, fully paid. INSUREs LIVES, GRANTS ANNUITIES, RECEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRA• , TOR, GUARDIAN, TRUSTEE, ASSIGNEE, COMMITTEE, RECEIVER, AGENT, ETC. - ALL TRUST FUNDs and INvestmiRNTs are kept separate and apart from the AsseTs of the CoMPANY. PRESIDENT, SAMUEL R. SHIPLEY. VICE PREsident, T. WISTAR BROWN. VICE PRESIDENT AND ACTUARY, ASA S. WING MANAGER or INSURANCE DEPT., JOS. ASHRRoao TRUST OFFICER, J. RobFRTs Foljfixià. Reuben Wilson #

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

|UNITED WITH

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY
THE FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER ASSOCIATION, LIMITED.

TERMS :—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE:

One copy, one year........................................................... $2.50.
8 copies, “ “ ... ....................................................... $2.25 each.
30 “ “ “ ...........................................................#2.00 “

***Subscriptions may begin at any time.

SINGLE NUMBERS, FIVE CENTS.

AIDVERTISING RATES :
For transient advertisements, 10 cents per line, one time; 7%
Cents per line, each insertion, two times. For longer insertion
reduced rates, which will be furnished on application.
REMITTANCES by Mail should be in CHECKs, DRAFTs, or
P. O. MONEY-ORDERS; the last preferred. Money sent by Mail
Will be at the risk of the person so sending.

COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED AND PAYMENTS MADE TO
JOHN COMLY, AGENT,
AT PUBLIGATION OFFICE, No. 1020 AROH STREET.

Entered at the Post-Office at Philadelphia, Penna., as second-
Class matter.

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE.

POETRY :

God Knows & t g e go o e o † & 353

Idleness te e 363

After a Little While ë * * 363

EXTRACTS FROM NEW YOIr K YEARLY MEETING’s MINUTES 353

EXTRACT FROM JAMES BELLANGEE's Journ AL. 35 |

SAMUEL J. LEV ICK 355

MID-WEEK MEETINGS . 35.5

THE QUESTION OF THE DAY 356

THE INDWELLING GOD 356

OUR EXTRACTS-1885 * y te e g so 357

A PPARENT TRUTII OR ABSOLUTE TRUTH : WHICII? 357

PROGRESS . to & o 358

THE SECRET OF THE HILLS 358
EDITORIAI, :

Diversity of Gifts. . te g e e * i. e & 360

Conviction . * go e & e * e * io g 36I

MARRIAGE . © e io * o * e * * * { } 491

DEATHS . e * e * to to & & © © 361

BENJAMIN VILLE MONTHLY MEETING 362

| THE FIRST TEETOTALER . . 363

THE FIRST-DAY SCHOOLS o § 364

COMMUNICATIONS . 365

NEWS OF FRIENDS :

Orthodox Friends 366

English Friends te o io * > * y so so 367

ANTI-SLAVERY WORK AMONG FRIENDS IN THE SOUTH . 367

IS ACTIVITY RIGIIT * s * g t te * 368

SPARE THE BIRDS . e e G * wo o o g 368

INDIAN LIFE AND GROWTII AT HAMPTON . so is so V

NOTICES . o so we e * g { } to * go to vi

CURRENT EVENTS . * * g so * so Vii

ITEMS . vii

STRAWBRIDGE & CLOTHIER,

Exhibit at all times a most extensive
and comprehensive assortment of every

description of
DRY GOODS.

The stock includes Silks, Dress Goods,
Trimmings, Hosiery and Underwear,
Gloves, Housefurnishing Goods, Ready-
made Dresses and Wraps, and everything
that may be needed either for dress or
housefurnishing purposes. It is believed
that unusual inducements are offered, as
the stock is among the largest to be found
in the American market, and the prices are
guaranteed to be uniformly as low as

elsewhere on similar qualities of Goods.

| W. [I fifth and Miłł Śs,

(ESTABLISHED 30 YEARS.)

INTo. 5a 7 FIFR.A.INIEICHILINT so I’.,
2 Doors below Green St., PHILADELPHIA.

A NICE ASSOIRTMENT

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD AND LEASED LINES,
ON AND AFTER APRIL 18, 1885.
TRAINS LEAVE BROAD STREET STATION.
* Daily. 2 Daily. except Sunday.

| “New York and Chicago Limited ” of Pullman Pal#12.20 n”

[ocr errors]

a Ce CBI'S.- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . e s s see e s - & e s ess e s w to e o so e a se e s so e s s a e e s e s a o e s e s e * t Fast Line, Pittsburg and the West.......... .................... *11.50 a.m. Chicago and Cincinnati Express..........................“ *8.50 p.m. Western Express.................................--------------------------- *10.05 p.m. Pacific Express, West.................. .......................... e is to so e o e e *11.20 p.m. Harrisburg Express............................................... -------- *4:30 a.m.

Niagara Express.......................................“ ----------------- 37.40 a.m. Watkins Express.....................................: * * * g e o go to * * * * * * * * * * * * * 3.11.50 a.m. Erie Mail and Buffalo Express, except Saturday........ 11.20 p.m.

Kane Express............................................... ...::::::::------. § 8. Tol. Lock Haven Express....................................... .*4.30 and 311.60 a.m.

[blocks in formation]

Express on week days, 3.20, 4.35, 5.00, 5.45, 6.50, 7.30, 8.20, 8.30, 11.00 and 11.15 a.m. (Limited Express l.30 and 4.50 p.m.), 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6.30, 7.10, 7.40 and o; and 12.01 night. On Sundays, 3.20, 4.35, 5, 5.45, 8.30 a.m., 4 (Limited Express, 4.50), 6.30, 7.10 and 7.40 p.m. and 12.01 go; o For Brooklyn, N. Y., all through trains connect at Jersey City with boats of “Brooklyn Annex,” affording direct transfer to Fulton Street, avoiding double ferriage and journey across New York City. Express for Boston without change 6.30 p.m., daiiy. For Sea Girt, Spring Iake, Ocean Beach, Ocean Grove, Asbury Park and Long Branch, 6.50 and 11.15 a.m. and 8.00 p.m. On week days. For Freehold, 5.00 p.m. Daily except Sunday: Express for Easton, Delaware Water Gap, Scranton and Binghampton, 8.20 a.m., 12.0l noon and 6.30 p.m. For Scranton and Water Gap, 4.00 p.m.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »