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COMPETEXT PERSON, A FRIEND), WISHES A SITUA

tion Hp Companion, or to wait onlaninirlid or the care of a house, Best retereuce.

Audress, R..

Burlington, Y. J.

WANTED
A suitable Friend as Matron of Friends' Boarding IIouse.
Application to be made tu 1. N. HEESTER,

20:31 1.ocust St., Pluilad'n.

WANTED,
A girl or woman to do the work for family of mon and wife.
Rusillence in rural districts, with Poncleri) convenieniors
Would sult a person desiring a quiet home. Allidress lyv letter,

H. E. W., Office Friends' Intelligencer and Journal.

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LEWIS'98 perct.LYE.

MARIA C. PARTENHEIMER, Plain Bonnet Maker,

No. 653 NORTH TENTH ST.,

Abone Tallace Street,

POWDERED AND PERFUMED.

(PATEXTED)) The STROYGEST in PUREST Lve made Will make 12 bx, or the BEST Parfumeel Hard Snap in 20 minutes. WITI101'1 1011.IXG. It is the best for Disinfecting sinks, closets, drains, etc. Pirotograpliers' and inachinists' uses. Founiloymeil, boltine! nut makers, For engineers as a briler cleaner anal anti-incruisiator. Follieirer's and bottlers, for washing bilreis, lotiles, etc. For painters to remove old paints. For washing trees, etc, etc. PENNA. SALT MANUFG CO.,

Gen. Arts., Phila , Pa.

Philadelphia.

HOWARD J. LUKENS,

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,

S. W, COR. FIFTH AND WALNUT STS., PHILADELPHIA,

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SPENCERIAN

PENS

Conntry Boarding
In a Friend's Fainily nt. “Evergreen liome," a delightful
sharly place. Best of spring water, in: 1. trasli vegetables and
fruit in season, Address,

S.D. LIVIILI
Cliatloni, Chester Co., Pr.
For correspondents,

For expert writers,
OUR HEALTHFUL HOME.

Nos, 2 and 3

Nos, 1 n101 24. Invalids can enter this pleasantly situate Sanatorium, at ARE THE BEST.

ARE THE BEST. any time, for treatment, 011r 11 Croinmortations are first-rlass. Weliave soit spring water, dry invigorating :ir, fine walks SOLD BY ALI, DIALERS IX STATIONERY. anrlariups, wiili ilienvalitsues of both city ani rolnily.

Nr. A. SMITHIR very successful in healing the sick, with his comprehensive systein of meiliaalirament. TV:nlidis cannot find a better liome. Terms reasonable and for our circulars. Address,

A. SMITH, M.D.,
OUR IEALTİFUL VON £, Rodin, Pa.

PUBLISiirt By
Country Board,
In a quiet home among the Catskills. rctress,
awong

MIRY DRAKE,
Potter's Hollow. Albany Co., N. Y.

NEW YORK.

SUPERIOR TEXT BOOKS

D. APPLETON & CO.,

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MEYNEN & CO. ARTISTS and PHOTOGRAPHERS,

ONLY FIRST-CLASS WORK,
S. IV. COR. FRANKLIN AND GREEN STS., PITILADELPHIA.

FRIENDS' WEDDING INVITATIONS—WRITE FOR SAMPLES—NO CHARGE,

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"STANDARD"
Ice-Cream Freezers

Photographic Art Studio, NO. 818 ARCH STREET

SWARUHMORE COLLEGE

Are durable, substantial, and have no compli

FIIITAZELPHIA.
lated machinery. The mechanism is such
that they will freeze Cream, Fruirs, Water
Ices, etc , in the shortest possible time. Fur
sale by dealers in house furnishing goods gen-
erally. Price list on application.

30 Minutes from Broad St. Station, Philad'a. CIAS, W.PACKER, Manafacturer, Philad'a, Pr:

Under the care of Friends, but all others admitted.

Full college course for both sexes; Classical, Scientific WHAT $5.00 WILL BUY. and Literary. Also a Preparatory School. Healthful 11 $5.00 is sent tv us, either by Regis:ered Letter, Postal Note, and apparatus.

location, large grounds, new and extensive buildings Bink ilicik, ur Post Office Order, we will send either one of the

For catalogue and full particulars, address, filluwiny orders :-Order No. 1: We will send 6 pounds of good Black, Green, Jipan or mixed 'Tea, and 18 pounds of good mild or

EDWARD H. MAGILL, A.M., PRESIDENT, strong roasied Cottee. Order No. 2: We will send 30 pounds of

swarthmore, Fa. goud mild ur strong Roasted Cittee. Order No. 3: We will send 5 pounds of real good Black, Green, Japan, or Mixed Tea, and 15

ROBERT KELSO, p.junds of sine mild or strong Roasted Coffee. Order No. 4: We wiil send 2; pounds of real goud, mild or strong Ruasted Coffee.

KEYSTONE WOVEN WIRE MATTRESS. Persons may club together, and get one of these Orders, and we will divide it to suit the Club, sending it all to one address.

To those THE BEST, niet lurable and conifortwho wish to purchase in larger quantities, we will sell at much less

tu suil auy bedsteud. reduction. The Tea and Cittee will be securely packed, and sent by Express or Freight, whichever is ordered Samples of any of the abuse orders will be sent Free by Mail to examine. In ordering, pludse siy wh:cher Order N. 1, 2, 3, or 4, is desired. Call on or address WM. INGRAM & SON, Tea Dealers, 31 North Second Sire:t, Philadelphia, Pa.

DI AVI'FACTURER UP THE

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able SPRIXG MATTRESS iu use, Alade

CLEMENT A. WOODNUIT, UNDERTAKER,

Ilair Mattre-se, Cotton and llunk Mattresses, t'eather Beus, l'illuns, Eic.

IRON AND BRASS BEDSTEADS For Hospital, Asylum uud Pii

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REMOVED TO

WAREROOMS, 225 S. SECOND ST., Philad'a,

No. 1215 North Fifteenth Street,

IIIIIADEPIIIA..

Darlington Seminary for Young Ladies,

THE REVISED VERSION

OH TU

HOLY BIBLE

ENGLISHI EDITION.

NOW READY AND IN STOCK.
Prices range from 75 cento sp.
Specim... Catalogue sent fire pou application.

WEST & HESTÅR, PA. The Fall and l'inter Term on this institution will commence on the 14th of Imo. (sept.) next.

The school has a healty and beautiful location, with exten. sive grounds, and has been uniformly successful since its establishment, twenty-five years ago.

The ad vintages of in Academical and Collegiate education are fully secured, and Diplomas are grunted.

Terms. $18!) per school year.

For Illustrated Circular, und Catalogue giving full particulars, address the Principal,

RICII.IRD DARLINGTON, PH.D.,

ORDERS BY JAIL FOR BOOKS OR STATIONERY PROMPTLY ATTEXDED TO.

FEI NDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION 1020 ARCH STRLET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

West Chester, Penn'a.

ENTIRE WHOLESALE STOCK

THE FAMILY REMEDY FOR

AT RETAIL.

FAVORED BY THE CLERGY.
Constipation,

CHOICE
SELTZER

Headache,

Dyspepsia,
PIENTS

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CAREFULLY SELECTED

TO SUIT CITY SALES.

SUMMER

WEARABLES

A GREAT AND VARIED

ASD DISEASES ARISING FROM A DIS.

ORDERED OR WEAK STOJACH.

ASSORTMENT AND

ASTONISHING PRICES.

A prominent Diviue of Charleston, S.C., writes under date of Dec. 3, 1887: -") very willingly bear testiwuny to the value of TARRANTS SELTZER APERIENT. Il bias been in use in my family for many years. I never travel without it, and live found it of special value is a preventative or corrective of Ben-sick pers. I lave been enablid liy it to relieve many who were suffering frum this most distressing Dalady, and who found other remedies ipetfective."

COOPER & CONARD,

Ninth and Market Sts., Philadelphia.

SUPERIOR

Spectacles & Eye Glasses, SPRINGETT COTTAGE,

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SIXTH AVE. WEST OF WEBB STREET,

PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS,

MICROSCOPES,

ASBURY PARK, N. J.

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RE-OPENS JUNE 1ST.

MARY A. PAFF.

TELESCOPES, FIELD-GLASSES,
MAGIC LANTERNS, BAROMETERS,

THERMOMETERS, DRAWING INSTRUMENTS, PHILO-WEARY WORKERS & NERVOUS SUFFERERS

Will find DR. SHATTUCK'S

SOPHICAL AND CHEMICAL APPARATUS. List and Descriptions of our Ten Catalogues sent FREE

on application.

REST CURE, At Bloomsburgh, Pa., an enjoyable home at which to rest or get well. The patronage of Friends, of whom we had a goodly number last 80280n is especially desired. Bugage rooms early. Send stamp for Circular.

PHILADELPHIA.

No. 924 Chestnut Street,

ENGRAVING,

Plate Printing, Visiting Cards, FOR SALE,

Wedding Invitations, One of the finest five acre building sites in the vicinity of Media. Situate on the Providence Great Road, FRIENDS' MARRIAGE CERTIFICATES, half way between Wallingford and Media. No im

College and Class Invitations, provements. Apply to ISAAC L. MILLER,

Fine Stationery. 706 Walnut Street, Philada.

FRIENDS' BOOK ASSOCIATION, E. & M. E. COPE,

1020 ARCE STREET,

PHILADELPHIA.

PLAIN AND FASHIONABLE MILLINERY,

WM. H. JONES,

THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND. 446 FRANKLIN ST.,

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE, (Formerly 212 Arch Stroet,

DEVOTED TO THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE YOUNG. Moderate Prices.

Philadelphia

Terms, $1.50 a year, in advance. EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS :-) still regard THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND as one of the purest and freshest contributions tu juvenile literature."

"I hope your important and valuable enterprise of providing men tal fiod for the young, may meet with the best success." Address,

M. Y. HOUGH,
THE DEALER IN

1020 Arch Street, Phila., Pa Agricultural Implements, Seeds aud Fertilizers.

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The Cheapest and Largest Variety. At The INTELLIGENCER AND JOURNAL and CHILDREN'S FRIEND one year
2043 and 2041 Market Street, Philadel. for $3.40.
plia. PA.

Reapers, Binders and Mowers of the lead.
ing kinds Horse Rakes, Hay Tedders, Grain

WANTED.
Drüls, Threshing Machines, Agricultural Port-

A Teacher of French and German; must speak them fluently
able Engines, Wind Engines of various kinds, and in addition, be able to teach the common English branches.
Force and Suction Pumps, Grain Feed Mills of Testimonials required. Friend preferred. Address,
all sizes and kinds, Hay Forks and Eleva-

THOS. W.SIDWELL, PRINCIPAL, tors, Wagons and Carts, Chilled Steel and

Friends' Select School, Washiogton, D. C. Cast Plows of all varieties and sizes, Belle City, Baldwin and Telegraph Feed Catters of all sizes, also various other kinds, Harrows of every device conceivable. Kemp's Manure and Philpot's Fertilizer

Wanted Spreaders the Unior Grain rill, and other kinds, Meat Cutters from the smallest to Jun: bu size; Farm Boilers and Hog Scalders, Cora Shellers, from "Pot" size A Kindergartner at Friends' Select School, S. E. Cor. Fourth to tlie capacity of 50100 bushels per day. I am in comnunication with all and Green Streets. Address. ANNE M. GRISCOM, 622 Marthe Agricultural Implement builders iu thu Vuited States.

shall Street, or SAMUEL H. GARTLEY, 606 N. Seventh Street, He Send for ciroulars of any kind of goods wanted.

Committee.

2...

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UNITED WITH

The Friends' Journal.

BY JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER.

For The Intelligencer and Journal.

. Vorilia - NC 22.} PHILADELPHIA, SEVENTH MONTH 11, 1885. {Vol

Vol. xiii.-No. 650.

may prevail in the school-room, and the pupils may THE WORTH OF PAIN.

yield to a semi-physical force, without having their judgment convinced that the command is just or that

any principle is involved in the matter. The clouds which rise with thunder, slake

In the opinion of the writer, theory is as essential Our thirsty souls with rain ;

in pedagogy as it is in the medical or the legal The blow most dreaded falls, to break

professions; and the attempt to govern a school From off our limbs a chain; And wrongs of man to man but make

without it is mere empiricism. It is presumable The love of God more plain.

that this view is very generally entertained by those

having the management of Friends' schools, and As through the shadowy lens of even

hence it is needless to dwell upon the necessity of The eye looks farthest into heaven, On gleams of star and depths of blue

having some theory as the basis of our moral code. The glaring sunshine never knew.

This theory should be reduced to language-terse, simple and easily retained by the memory. It should be stated to the pupils so clearly that all

could comprehend it, and then they should be inETHICS APPLIED TO SCHOOL GOVERNMENT. formed that the rules and regulations of the school

have been framed with reference to the greatest good This is a subject which is now claiming much at of the greatest number as well as justice to each intention from teachers and committees having charge dividual; and that when carefully examined they of schools.

will be found to rest upon the foundation of abstract The importance of having a proper ethical code, right, as laid down in our theory. and of making a judicious application of it to indi- In framing a system of rules for the moral gove vidual cases, in all institutions intended for the train- ernment of a school, two points should be kept ing of the young, is now very generally conceded. steadily in view. Is the rule in entire accord with

Those who have had least experience in the man- our theory ? and, Can it be practically applied to the agement of schools, will perhaps find least difficulty | daily routine of school affairs? If it meet both of in preparing the code ; as the simple principle of these requirements, well; but if it fail in either, right must underlie all intention, and strict propriety rule it out. The practical part may have to be tried must be the uniform rule of action. This seems to before its feasibility can be determined; but in the embrace all that is needed : a conscientious aralysis theoretical there can be no wavering, for it is based of the motive, and the application of the “Golden upon an immutable principle. Unless the teacher Rule" to the performance of the deed. But it will be be possessed of sound views and be guided by endiscovered by observation, and confirmed by experi- lightened judgment and by some experience (either ence, that in the school-room, as in the great world, his own or that of another), he will be likely to there is a practical as well as a theoretical view to make many mistakes in the preparation of his ideal be taken of the situation. There is a real condition ethical code ; and often with mature judgment and of affairs, as well as a sentimental aspect. To har- large experience, it is found difficult to make rules monizemnot to unify—these two elements should be to meet all cases, that will at once conform strictly to the prevailing consideration in the preparation of our theory and be feasible in their practical appliany system of school ethics.

cation. It is to be regretted that there are to be found in For the fundamental tenets of a code, I would the ranks of teachers some who are disposed to ig- recommend a faithful observance of the laws of nore all theory with regard to an ethical standard truthfulness, kindness and justice ; believing that a for the government of their schools. They insist on character reared upon these three will be likely to a strict compliance with the law as given forth from exhibit in the superstructure of conduct the qualities the platform, but they are unable or unwilling to which are essential to the welfare and harmony of a give any satisfactory reason why such a law should community - candor, courtesy and consideration. exist, and the only reason assigned for its enforce. A pupil who conforms his conduct to a course of acment is the ipse dixit of him who both proclaims and tion having such a basis will not be likely to go far executes it. Such teachers often have the credit of astray from the path of rectitude; and if it should being successful; they may have the ability to com- happen that he violate some technical rule, it might mand, and the will to enforce obedience; and owing be well to consider which is more at fault, the pupil to these inherent qualities in the teacher, good order or the rule.

.

6 'Tis not to make reply,
'Tis not to reason why,
'Tis but to do,"

If the teacher, in his intercourse with the pupils, | thing out of place, while the former is that which is exhibit these three qualities, he may observe the wrong at all times and in all places. force of the old proverb that “example is more pow- It must be constantly borne in mind that the forerful than precept." A teacher who practises decep mation of character is a matter of far greater motion, or resorts to artifices for any purpose whatever, ment than the orderly appearance of a school-room. is likely to forfeit the confidence of his pupils, and The more responsibility is placed upon a pupil, the ultimately to lose their respect. A person who is more frequent are the opportunities to discover latent destitute of refinement or a stranger to the ordinary traits of character, and to develop the good that is usages of good breeding, had better select some in him; while the more he is compelled to yield to other vocation than that of instructing the young; the force of mere authority, the less likely will he be and he who fails in consideration for the comfort of to respect himself or the governing power. his pupils or who cannot enter into sympathy with The logical relation of penalty to offense is a matthem, may expect to find them violating the proprie- ter that has received much attention in our normal ties and manifesting a general disregard for the schools, and it is gratifying to note that it is probafitness of things.

bly as nearly reduced to a science as is anything in In order to insure candor there must not be too the entire range of school government. much fear. A proper respect for authority is a men

The right of appeal, which is allowed a criminal tal condition very different from that of abject fear; in a court of justice, should certainly not be denied the former being entirely compatible with self-respect a pupil in a well-ordered school. But I would enand candor, while the latter is one of the most fruit- courage an appeal to the teacher rather than from ful sources of deception. Tyranny in the family, the him. When a direct command has been given in school-room or the nation is almost certain to beget the class-room, either servility or rebellion, according to the temper of the subjects over whom it is exercised; while the wholesome restraint which is necessary to preserve and if the pupil have the knowledge and assurance trust voluntarily placed by the governed in the that before the close of the day he can have an ophands of the governing power. Such at least is the portunity to approach his teacher and make such exrepublican idea of a government and a ruler.

planation as he feels quite sure will be satisfactory, Courtesy must be manifested by acts rather than he will cheerfully obey the command or even accept explained by words; and where it is properly understanding, and that in the course of a few hours

a reprimand-knowing that it is the result of a misattended to at home, the teacher has little difficulty he will be vindicated. These private interviews bein cultivating it in the school, provided he be him he will be vindicated. These private interviews beself an exemplar of refinement and good-breeding.

tween teacher and pupil have a tendency to bring Consideration is not so easily maintained ; in fact, a proper spirit, they afford an excellent opportunity

the two very near together; and, when conducted in it seems almost antagonistic to the free impulse of for a word of advice or caution on some subject other youth to stop long enough to consider consequences than that for which the interview was called. or proprieties before proceeding to act. The pupil The spirit and the letter of Friends' Discipline who would scorn to be found derelict in candor, and would afford an excellent study for the young teacher to whom courtesy has become as a second nature, who desires to deal with offenders in the right spirit, often fails to regard the time, the place, the circum- "in order for their help.” stances, and even the property by which he is sur- The whole subject is one of great breadth, and to rounded. He does "not mean to be naughty," but treat it exhaustively would be to write a book. In just at the critical moment his “ love of fun," or fact many books have been written on the kindred some other sudden impulse, overcomes his considera- topic of school government, which to be wise and tion, and hence the misdemeanor is committed. In judicious must be based on school ethics. In sumdealing with offenses of this kind, the teacher should ming up these desultory suggestions, I would say: be able to discriminate between the motive and the First, bave a theory on which is based the moral result; for while the latter may cause great annoy-code of the school. Second, let the observance of ance and even serious inconvenience, the former may candor, courtesy and consideration be the general be free from any taint of malice or evil intention. law of conduct. Third, endeavor to practise what In cases of this kind, it is very desirable to have you preach. Fourth, make a broad distinction besome time elapse between the commission of the of-tween disorder and misconduct; treating the former fense and the administration of the discipline. This as a venial transgression and the latter as a grave affords an opportunity for the youthful impulse to offense. Fifth, have the pupils govern themselves, subside, and for the teacher to muster all his forces by placing responsibility upon them. Sixth, obfor self-control. Then the matter may be approached serve carefully the logical relation between penalty rather in a business-like way, and the offender be and offense. Seventb, let your pupils find you easy asked how he purposes making good the damage ? of access, after school; so that no one need go home Whether property or feelings have been marred by feeling that he has been unjustly treated, and has his thoughtlessness, he must endeavor to place mat- had no opportunity to state his grievance. Eighth, ters on the same footing as they occupied before the after the settlement of a difficulty by a private inoffense occurred.

terview, try to turn the opportunity to good account The distinction between misconduct and disorder for the inculcation of some moral lesson. This being should be well defined; the latter being merely some-done, drop some word or perform some act of kind

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